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"Five Lessons: The Modern Fundamentals of Golf" by Ben Hogan


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After following the forum, I bought it yesterday. Flipping through it things look well described with good pictures. On the advice of others in the thread, I'm going at it one lesson at a time, work on it and move on.
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I picked up the book a few weeks ago. I read the first two chapters on Grip and Stance/Posture with a club beside me in about a day's time. I would read a little, practice, read a little, practice and so on. The next day I went out and posted my best round ever (80). After this success, I excitedly read the rest of the book in about an hour. The next day I went out and put up a 93.
My point is, take a "building-block" approach to the book. Do not move on to lesson two until you are totally comfortable with lesson one. Personally, (after the 93) I am starting over with the book and really taking my time. I read lesson one probably 15+ times before moving on to lesson two, which is were I am currently working. I think this is the way he intended readers to approach the book.

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I picked up the book a few weeks ago. I read the first two chapters on Grip and Stance/Posture with a club beside me in about a day's time. I would read a little, practice, read a little, practice and so on. The next day I went out and posted my best round ever (80). After this success, I excitedly read the rest of the book in about an hour. The next day I went out and put up a 93.

Well said! I couldn't agree with you more. I must have read Hogan's Five Lessons a dozen times and I learn something each time...

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Totally agree. The lessons are sequenced the way they are because this is how Hogan thought the final swing should be developed. It is like building a house... first the foundation and plumbing, then the walls, etc. You don't move in until its finished.
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  • 2 weeks later...
I read lesson one probably 15+ times before moving on to lesson two, which is were I am currently working. I think this is the way he intended readers to approach the book.

It was done as a series of magazine articles before it was a book. You had plenty of time to read one before the next one came out. I read the whole book in a day, and probably didn't absorb near as much as I could have.

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Just re-reading a recent 50th Anniversary Edition I bought off Amazon. Read it years (~20+) ago when I started and thought it made a lot of practical sense. Re-reading it again after all these years makes me realise what a brilliant book it is.

Buy it, read it, trust it. Great book.
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Just started reading htis book, and already, my grip needs a major overhaul...but seeing as he battled a hook, how would i change my grip to battle a slice? or would i just do it as in the book?
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Do the grip as Hogan explains it... the whole idea of a good grip is to promote a proper and unconscious squaring, and automatic release, through impact (that is if you also apply his other fundamentals, too.) It may be an old book, but I still think there is none better for the fundamentals of the golf swing.

Once the Hogan grip is natural, you can do some slight tweaking to match your own swing path. Some use a little stronger grip, some use a little weaker, and some put their right hand thumb more on the top of the grip, etc. But you cannot go wrong with Hogan's fundamentals. I think I remember hearing Hogan adjusted his explanation of the grip to fit the average player, so it would fit a norm. He may actually have used a slightly weaker right hand grip to avoid draw spin on many shots. But no matter your final choices, make sure your left hand grip is essentially as Hogan explains it, under the heel pad, and more in the fingers (great diagrams in the book.)
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Read it a month ago... I can't even put into words how much it has helped. I've read it cover to cover 3 times, I think it's time for number 4. I wish I read it 5 years ago. Damn, better late then never. Still have yet to break 80.
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Just started reading htis book, and already, my grip needs a major overhaul...but seeing as he battled a hook, how would i change my grip to battle a slice? or would i just do it as in the book?

Hi Phillip,

If you have a slice you don't wanna use the Hogan grip as his was weak - this grip will only make your slice worse. Make the "V's" created by the left and right hand's thumb/forefinger point more towards your right shoulder rather than your right ear (if you're right handed). Everything else Hogan says about the grip still applies, especially the pressure points. Play well. --John
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Very much considering a purchase and that's a great point lynchjo. Will keep this in mind as I read the book. Not currently battling, but my tendency is in that direction.
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Love this Book!!! I have played three rounds of golf, and everytime i hit the ball, i skip it, or top it etc... I bought this book YESTERDAY!!! read over the grip and posture section and practiced exactly as he writes, for an hour or two, went out to the range, and i was amazed, i was hitting the ball in the air with my irons, distance isn't quite there yet, but i could hit the ball w/ LOFT!!! I have a bit of a slice, and will adjust my grip accordingly, but will recap the grip and posture section and then move onto the next sections, but this book has gained my complete confidence! Looking foward to reaping the benefits of the Five Lessons.
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