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"Golf is Not a Game of Perfect" (and his other mental game books) by Bob Rotella

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I played on Friday with a friend who reminded me of -- literally, brought up in conversation -- this book. So I took it off my bookshelf and thumbed through it a bit; it's probably been a while. There's some advice in it that I know is wrong -- he advises that a majority of practice time should be devoted to the short game. No thanks, I know better, although in his defense, he does define it as being inside 120 yards, and there are plenty of 60-120 yard shots that use full swing mechanics, so maybe. And then there's some that I had gotten away from and need to be reminded of, like the focusing on a specific target before a shot. For those who have read it recently: does it still hold up? Is it largely good advice?

Interesting I know as I have read all the latest evidence to the contrary regarding the short game. Read a sample of Bob's from the unstoppable golfer. He said gir determines the highest score you could shoot. A pro may hit 15 greens and shoot 75 if his putting and wedge are off. If his short game is on then he will shoot in the low 60's. For an amateur who hits maybe 3-5 greens then 90 or so is the highest but a great short game can help you shoot low 80's. I know lots of you will disagree but one begets the other in my mind. It's like the chicken and the egg. Putting more importance into one than the other and I respect the numbers and percentage of practice time and so forth. My swing is much improved but I'm in my 40's and I won't reach a 250 plus drive on a regular basis. I won't stop refining it but know I can't rely on distance so my low scores will come from a lot of mid iron approaches and being realistic use of a higher caliber short game. Sorry if I sound like a heretic no offence to any who believe to the contrary.

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So I downloaded this book from iTunes for under $10. Seems like generally good advice but easier said than done. Easy to say don't let your last bad shot interfere with the next. Not so easy to forget in reality.

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Ended up buying the unstoppable golfer. I have 3 Dr Bob books now and they all have similarities but there's always little nuggets that are fresh in there.Patience and belief in what you are doing was a strong message. The visualisation techniques are really discussed in detail in this one. In all 3 books the short game had a section but this one was very detailed. I really enjoy books about psychology of the brain it's a fascinating subject. Lots of us here are more than willing to put the time into the physical skill. Really though what gives you the ability to perform the physical originates with the mental. I totally buy into the concept of brain as a muscle in itself. Train your mind and your game at the same. I've dropped 20 strokes in 2 years after stalling for 5 years without my scores showing improvement. I won't need to buy anymore of his books as I have other reading material along similar lines so it's a case of reviewing it and doing it.

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I always go back to Golf is not a Game of Perfect and review it every season, as I find a lot of the mental exercises very useful. Last year I lent it to a friend and he ended up lending it to someone else and he can't remember to whom. I mentioned to him recently that I like to review it every year, thinking that would get him to think about what to do next but I still have not received a new copy. Oh well, live and learn, off to the bookstore.

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I always go back to Golf is not a Game of Perfect and review it every season, as I find a lot of the mental exercises very useful. Last year I lent it to a friend and he ended up lending it to someone else and he can't remember to whom. I mentioned to him recently that I like to review it every year, thinking that would get him to think about what to do next but I still have not received a new copy. Oh well, live and learn, off to the bookstore.

That does not sound like a friend to me. ;)  I, too, love this book.  I need to break it out and re-read it as its been too long though. :beer:

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I read the book a couple months back and it helped me visualizing my shots before I approach the ball. I am still in the process of creating my own pre-shot routine.

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I am about halfway through Golf is Not a Game of Perfect. Maybe it's because I've heard all this stuff before in one form or another, maybe it's the incessant name dropping, but I find it underwhelming. To be fair, I suppose the reason why I have read this all before in one shape or another  is because of Bob Rotella, so credit due, but I just find it doesn't live up to the hype. I much preferred Fred Shoemaker's books. 

When I bought it on my Kobo, I was vacillating between this and Stockton's Unconscious Putting. I went with this because I'm pretty happy with my putting and don't want to **** with it. 

I'll finish the book as it is full of good stuff, just not as engaging as I had expected. 

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1 hour ago, Ernest Jones said:

I am about halfway through Golf is Not a Game of Perfect. Maybe it's because I've heard all this stuff before in one form or another, maybe it's the incessant name dropping, but I find it underwhelming. To be fair, I suppose the reason why I have read this all before in one shape or another  is because of Bob Rotella, so credit due, but I just find it doesn't live up to the hype. I much preferred Fred Shoemaker's books. 

When I bought it on my Kobo, I was vacillating between this and Stockton's Unconscious Putting. I went with this because I'm pretty happy with my putting and don't want to **** with it. 

I'll finish the book as it is full of good stuff, just not as engaging as I had expected. 

I've read both. The both are worth the read and I know you like to read! 

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Read his putting book last night. Its funny to read older books (I think its older) and still see people print that putting is as equally important as performance off the tee. Besides for that, what really clicked for me was the focus on the target as well as the difference in thinking between a good and bad putter.

Im not even sure he meant for this one paragraph to trigger a lot of thought, but he wrote how small kids are good putters. This is because rolling a ball is very simple and kids dont know enough to make it confusing. Thats the kind of thinking I need.

Decided to read the book after having 21 putts in a 9 hole round on Sunday, with 2 4-putts.

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Perhaps Rotella is good for an intro to the mental game.  I found his books lack any deep exploration of modern performance psychology.  Weak tea.  I love Pia Nilson/Lynn Marriott books on the game.  Also love Joe Parent's Zen Golf and Zen Putting.  Glad to see people who were helped by Rotella, and I would implore you all to check out the above titles if you haven't yet.  Also check out Fearless Golf, by Gio Valiente.  That may be my favorite.  Hack on!

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I found this book very easy to read and with some useful information.. helped me block out negative thoughts for a couple of rounds and play well. After that i went back to over thinking, but that says mkre about me than this book. 

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Read it, liked it, read it again, still liked it.  Some of the actual advice has been proven wrong by newer statistical studies in terms of what to practice and what's really important overall for your golf game, but the mental side of the game and how to approach practice and your rounds is still top notch.

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3 hours ago, Clinton Carmack said:

Hello! I was wondering, how reading a book about golf would improve your game skills. It's all about practice, like in every field. I mean you should read books, but will you play better after reading all of these.

Welcome to The Sand Trap!

They do help. I get something out of each one I read. Plus, I like to read about golf.

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1 hour ago, boogielicious said:

Welcome to The Sand Trap!

They do help. I get something out of each one I read. Plus, I like to read about golf.

Absolutely! We have our libraries. Some of mine are pretty old, but all are solid. Best to you, -Marv

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