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one plane vs. two plane golf swing?

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I was wondering if anyone (or any people) can help explain the main difference between the one and two plane swings. Recently, someone I know mentioned that he switched from a two to a one plane swing. Ever since, I've been doing some reading on the subject (mostly articles on the Internet), trying to figure out a) which type of swing I utilize, and b) which is "right" for me. Unfortunately, I haven't really been able to find an answer to either of the questions and seem even more confused.

There's a website that's devoted to the one-plane golf swing ( www.oneplanegolfswing.com ) where you can get some additional information. You can also read a Golf Digest article on the topic with some good pictures and explanations. Just keep following the "continue article" link towards the bottom of the page until you get to the end. I'm having some difficulty understanding the differences between the two swings. From the photos and breakdown of the swings, the only difference that I can see seems to be in the backswing and transition - the arms (and thus club) in the one plane swing seems to be "lower" than the two plane swing. Based on the descriptions and photos provided, I feel as if my swing is somewhere "in-between" (a one-plane set-up but then have a two-plane swing when I look at my positions in the mirror). With a golf instructor, I've basically re-built my swing after taking a few years off (and developing some really bad "over-the-top" tendencies). I haven't had a chance to discuss this with my instructor (yet), but I thought I'd see what I can learn beforehand. I'm curious to know what others think. From what I can tell, the majority of golf instruction about the golf swing seems to be more in the two-plane mold. Thinking back on what my golf instructor is having me do, I'm pretty sure I'm developing a two-plane swing. But, based on the photos in the two articles I listed above, I feel like the descriptions (especially the set-up) doesn't really apply to me (or at the very least, I can't recognize myself). Do you agree with the author's recommendations about the one/two plane swings (from the Golf Digest article)?
"If you are aggressive and strong in the chest, abdominals, back and shoulders, the one-plane swing will suit you better."

VS.

"If you lack body or arm strength, but are flexible and coordinated, the two-plane action should be your choice."

I'd be curious to hear what everyone thinks about this idea of a one vs. two plane swing. I've been reading the other threads in the Swing Tips section and it seems like there's quite a bit of knowledgeable guys out there. Unfortunately, I haven't read any posts on this particular topic. I'd love to hear your thoughts, comments, and explanations.

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The simpler the better, is the best answer. The simpler the swing the more consistent the results will be, a one-planer is using the big muscles involved in the body rotation to square the club face, the two-planer has to rely on hands and arms to square the clubface which can lead to inconsitencies as these are smaller muscles and thus more prone to the effects of pressure. Saying this there are good players in both catergories but the more consistent ball strikers tend to be more one plane (up and down on the same line).Ben Hogan was a one planer-need i say more.

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The simpler the better, is the best answer. The simpler the swing the more consistent the results will be, a one-planer is using the big muscles involved in the body rotation to square the club face, the two-planer has to rely on hands and arms to square the clubface which can lead to inconsitencies as these are smaller muscles and thus more prone to the effects of pressure. Saying this there are good players in both catergories but the more consistent ball strikers tend to be more one plane (up and down on the same line).Ben Hogan was a one planer-need i say more.

I don't like your "one size fits all" answer. For some people, "the simpler the better" may be a two-plane swing.

The only purpose of the backswing is to put your body in a position from which you can make a proper downswing.

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For the past months i've been switching between a one and two plane swing. like all golf nuts, i continue to tinker with my swing in search of the SWING. The two plane swing is easier to execute on the backswing as armsy upright swing gives the feeling of looseness and a lazy swing. The downswing is very tricky to execute correctly. It requires great timing and coordination.

The one plane swing demands more commitment in the backswing, as it is dictated by the movement of the torso. the arms just follow. On the downswing however, it is so automatic, you dont have to think of anything. Just uncoil after the bakcswing has been completed. No more need to reposition arms before unwinding... etc.

Last round of golf I played, I experimented and used two plane swing in the front nine. I hit balls ok but not consistently solid. I was getting outdriven by my buddy who was using a one plane swing. I switched to the one plane swing in the back nine and boy what a difference it was. My drives were hit more solid and more consistently. Ended up outdriving my buddy on more than a couple of holes.

verdict: one plane swing is much more reliable but requires commitment :)

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I noticed when I tried the one-plane my drives were very low..does this sound right?

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For the past months i've been switching between a one and two plane swing. like all golf nuts, i continue to tinker with my swing in search of the SWING. The two plane swing is easier to execute on the backswing as armsy upright swing gives the feeling of looseness and a lazy swing. The downswing is very tricky to execute correctly. It requires great timing and coordination.

Thanks for the feedback. It's good to know that other people are tinkering too :)

But, I think that I agree with Erik's earlier post about the backswing:
I don't like your "one size fits all" answer. For some people, "the simpler the better" may be a two-plane swing.

I guess my challenge has been that my golf instructor clearly wants me to develop a two-plane swing. I don't have a problem with that. But, now that I look at my "bad swing tendencies", I wonder if my body-type and "natural" swing is more of a one-plane swing. My major challenge has been that while I try to go for a classic two-plane swing, I tend to rotate "flat" and need to remind myself every so often that the arms/hands need to go "up" not "around". I wonder if my body is trying to tell me that I'm not a two-plane person. Who knows... That's partly what I love about golf - there's always something to improve and learn (but it can be dang frustrating at times...)

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I tried Symple Swing, and though it does have some advantages, I just am flat out more comfortable with a conventional swing at this point. Although it sounds like infomercial hype, I was amazed at how much just swinging a weighted training club along with an old hinged trainer straightened out my previous slice. Slowing down and getting my clubs flattened out to the correct lie has left me amazed how consistently I can hit my irons and woods now. Not perfect everytime, but pretty good and it's made golf fun again. $0.02

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For me its just a matter of how steep a takeaway and backswing you make and how you descend on the ball. The two-plane naturally suits me better. When I'm really striking the ball well, especially with my short irons, I feel almost like drove the ball into the ground. The sensation is of driving a stake through the back portion of the ball into the ground almost. Bascially, at the top, the two-plane swing will have the hands high and will reveal the back shoulder (right if you're right handed). The shoulders are on one-plane, the arms are on another.

I also don't buy the "if you're stonger in the chest and arms...the one-plane swing will suit you." I read that as well and thought, "huh, that's kind of an insult." Well, if its true, I guess I'm weak like Tiger...(he's gone back toward his original two-plane swing).

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The simpler the better, is the best answer. The simpler the swing the more consistent the results will be, a one-planer is using the big muscles involved in the body rotation to square the club face, the two-planer has to rely on hands and arms to square the clubface which can lead to inconsitencies as these are smaller muscles and thus more prone to the effects of pressure. Saying this there are good players in both catergories but the more consistent ball strikers tend to be more one plane (up and down on the same line).Ben Hogan was a one planer-need i say more.

Eh, this debate is a little silly. Look at the miriad of other one-planers who don't strike it like Hogan. Nobody but Hogan hits the ball with the kind of consitency of contact Hogan did. Jack Nicklaus commented when asked if Tiger (a two-planer with one-plane identity issues

) was the best ball striker he had ever seen "no, no question its Hogan." That's saying not even Tiger, the best golfer of this generation and a man who is perhaps on his way to being the most prolific winner of all time, is not as good a ball striker as Hogan. Am I to believe Watson, Davis Love III, Hale Irwin, Phil Mickleson, Payne Stewart, David Toms, Lee Janzen etc... are led to "inconsistencies" and more prone to the adverse effect of "pressure" because of the particular swing plane category they fall into? I think we're a little caught up in the minute if we're going that far.

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I had a two plane swing and didn't like it because it wasn't as repeatable as I'd like. That's not to say I didn't play well with it, it's just that I hit the point that I thought I couldn't get any better with it. It took me about a year to get comfortable with a one plane swing and I love it. I don't think it is a perfect one plane swing...I'm probably still taking it outside a bit on the takeaway, but it is only slight.

The biggest difference with my game now is that my streaks of good ball striking are much longer because when things go bad it is easier for me to identify the problem...which is usually in my setup.

If I had to give advice, it would be to do what is natural. Two plane to me was a solution to a problem that I had with coming over the top...but never felt right to me. I'm a one plane kind of guy, but there are plenty of guys on tour that are making boatloads of money the other way.

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hi guys,

it is interesting to find this this thread. last week I started to get lessons again. But due to the fact that I am in the US for a couple of months I had to pick a new coach.

He wants me to do the two-swing-plane. I would say that my previous swing was a single-plane-swing.

Right now, after two lessons, and being able to hit a ball again I think I might like the two-plane-swing.

But most of all, I never experienced the fact, that the coach wants you to understand what you are doing and for what reason. I really enjoy that!

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As a student of Moe Norman's swing, I swing on a single-axis. Many of us used to say "one plane" until all this one and two plane talk became mainstream a few years ago. What others mean by "one-plane is not what what mean by "single-axis." In Single-Axis, we set up with the club shaft on the same plane as it is at impact. Start and impact on the same plane.

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To me it doesn't matter, as long as you can make it work, I think i have been a two planer for a long time, but slowly been moving to a more single plane

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Originally Posted by Harmonious

Not sure why this old, old thread was reborn


Because someone probably did a search and found this thread and didn't notice the last post previous was from 2008. :)

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Note: This thread is 1626 days old. We appreciate that you found this thread instead of starting a new one, but if you plan to post here please make sure it's still relevant. If not, please start a new topic. Thank you!

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