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tmf9

How do you hit an intentional fade?

19 posts in this topic

I have a natural draw and can control it pretty well but I have no idea how to hit a fade. What do you change to hit an intentional fade. It would help me a lot at my HS course because we have lots of dogleg rights.
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To hit a high fade with the driver this is what I do.

Tee the ball forward in the stance (off my toe instead of instep) and tee it higher.
I then open up my stance to square (I usually hit the driver with a slightly closed stance)

To hit more of a fade, I'll open up the club face a tiny bit.

I do not alter my swing. I may subconsciously weaken my grip a bit if an extreme fade is needed.

First try teeing the ball further forward and off your toe (and a bit higher).
See how you hit it.
If you don't fade it, try opening your stance a bit with the ball in the forward/high position.
If you still aren't fading it, open the clubface a bit still using the above three.
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Ha man, I'm your age but I have the exact opposite. I have a normal fade. Really my shoulders are set up to the right of the target, and my feet are a bit left of it. Then I just swing normally on the path of my feet. The clubface is still square with my shoulders, but on the line of my feet, giving the ball the spin needed for a fade.

Another simple approach would be to leave the face open a little bit through impact. Take your club back like normal, but stop right before you hit the ball. Look at where the face of your club is pointing. For you it would be either at the target, or a bit left of it for your draw. For the fade try and keep the face a bit open through impact, and leave it open after impact. Good luck, and have fun on the golf team!

~RHPM
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To hit a high fade with the driver this is what I do.

I will try to open up the clubface. I already tee the ball off my front toe.

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Ha man, I'm your age but I have the exact opposite. I have a normal fade. Really my shoulders are set up to the right of the target, and my feet are a bit left of it. Then I just swing normally on the path of my feet. The clubface is still square with my shoulders, but on the line of my feet, giving the ball the spin needed for a fade.

It's hard not to have fun on the golf team, the coach lets us just play 9 holes at practice, and we get out at 12:00 on away matches.

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Open clubface and slightly forward of normal ball position. With these I also hold off on the release.
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It's hard not to have fun on the golf team, the coach lets us just play 9 holes at practice, and we get out at 12:00 on away matches.

True true. I wasn't on the golf team my freshman year, I had a knee injury and couldn't try out for it. But tryouts are tuesday (day after tomorrow). Can't wait!! I know I'll make it, but I like seeing the other kids out there. I haven't seen some of the guys in a while. Plussss my Top Flite Freaks are coming tomorrow. I'm hoping to amp up my game a bit and maybe go to state. I can't get enough of golf.
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I saw a video about this and the guy says to line your ball logo straight, and to hit a fade aim two dimples left of the logo, and for a draw, aim 2 dimples right of the logo. I could do it with practice plastic balls in the backyard, but haven't had a need to do it yet on the course.
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When I try to create a little cut, I try to make sure that my right hand never turns over my left for as long as possible through impact. As far as alignment, I line my feet up where i wanna start it and the clubface where i want the ball to end up.

ANd then I try to execute to the greatest of my lacking abilities
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True true. I wasn't on the golf team my freshman year, I had a knee injury and couldn't try out for it. But tryouts are tuesday (day after tomorrow). Can't wait!! I know I'll make it, but I like seeing the other kids out there. I haven't seen some of the guys in a while. Plussss my Top Flite Freaks are coming tomorrow.

Really our tryouts aren't until like January or February. I have my Callaway X forged wedge coming tomorrow, I can't wait for that.

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I take a little bit of a weaker grip. Thats all. Swing naturally.
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I have the same issue. I have a really hard time hitting a fade. My fade is more of a dead straight ball and my draw is a very noticeable hard draw.

I can't hit my fade for distance though. To do it, I just open my body and club face and make sure to hold off the release of the club. If I do release it as I normally do I will hit a double cross.

I can't hit the fade for power. It is about 25 yards shorter than my standard draw. I also have a pretty strong grip so I am sure that contributes to my ball flight.
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I find that I can draw or fade the ball by the placement of my feet. If I want to draw, I take my normal stance, then pull back my right foot about 6 inches. If I want to fade, I take my normal stance, then move my right foot forward about 6 to 8 inches. I also take a different trajectory on the pull back of the club. For the draw, the pull back is like a door opening, for the fade, the club is taken back and forward like to about 2 o'clock if you get my meaning, then I swing similar to taking a sand shot. this puts clockwise spin on the ball and it fades. good luck. Weekend Pro
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Well what I do is aim the the club at the target aim you feet, knees left of the target. Swing along the line of your feet. I will then impart fade spin on the ball. I hope that works cause it works for me. I do the opposite for a draw
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line my left hand thumb straight down the top of the shaft (weak grip), and then on my backswing I open up the club face rather than keeping it square.

I don't do anything fancy with my feet or downswing. I might finish with my arms a little higher in the air on the follow through. just aim a bit more left and trust the swing.

I think visualization before you make the shot, and while you're standing over the ball is crucial. seeing the club travel the path you want and causing the ball to spin off the face for the fade.
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You are gonna get tons of variations. Maybe there will be some commonalities that you can try.


I try to keep it simple.

First thing is to trust it....that is I have to force myself to open my stance and believe the ball will fade.

I back the ball up in my stance just a small amount (gives the head less time to close).

A little bit firmer than normal grip pressure throughout the swing.

Less lower body action than normal.

Swing to a high finish.

Watch the ball come out left and rise to a nice predictable fade.
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Lately I've been hitting a great controlled fade.

I take the same stance/same ball position/same club address position as my 'normal' shot (a natural draw). I take aim like I'm going to hit it straight, then after I'm set up I pick a spot to the left of my target. I try to swing to the spot to the left - creating a very slight outside-in swing path = a solid strike and a controlled fade.
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Good advice above. I simply set up square to slightly open and grip it a smidge tighter with the left hand. This inhibits a full release of the club by the right hand and causes a slight fade. Good Luck!
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