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Bowtie_guy

Golf Beginner needs help w/ clubs

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Hey guys,
I'm a golfing beginner and looking to buy my golf clubs soon so I can get into a class and learn the game.
What are the essential clubs I need in my bag? (Obviously a driver, putter, irons). I'm confused with the woods/Hybrids and the wedges. Like, do I need woods if Im going to get a hybrid? What hybrids would I need? How do I decide what the club degree needs to be? Regular or Stiff flex? What number wood/hybrid do I need? etc....

Any advice would be appreciated as none of my immediate family members know anything about golf.

Thanks.

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I would check ebay for a set of used clubs. This is what I did, and substituted my own putter and a few wedges, etc for feel. You can always take out clubs you don't like, and get an idea of which clubs work best for you... worst case scenario, you don't like any and put it back on ebay for the next beginner golfer... and there is no exact measurement really, golf equipment is completely about what works best for YOU

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DUDE... don't do it!! Look up those clubs on golfsmith or Rockbottomgolf... you can buy them all new for less. I just looked and the price was $660. No offense to the seller or the bidders, but that's gettin a little pricey for that set. Yes, it's in nice shape, but remember that they're used. 149 on golfsmith for the driver, 399 for the iron set, both new.
Go to a Golfsmith store or a Nevada Bob's or golf Galaxy and try out some irons. See what you like before buying something off eBay. You might not like them, then what?

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I forgot to reply to the rest of your question.
Driver: Honestly, this is the least of your worries as a beginner. It's the sexy club, but if you can hit one straight and long, you can hit them all straight and long, with a little practice.
Fairway Woods: Can be used off the tee or off the ground. Forgiving, and long.
Hybrids: These clubs have replaced the long irons (2,3,4 irons etc.) of the past in many cases. Bigger, heavier, more forgiving clubs made to make tougher lies easier to play
Irons: From forged blades to the more forgiving Cavity Back type (like those Nike Ignites that you were looking at), irons are where the money shots come from. As a beginner, I would recommend cavity backs. They have a larger sweet spot.
Wedges: You can usually make do with one or two extra wedges. A sand wedge is as close to a must have as there is- unless the course you play doesn't have much sand. Until your game becomes consistent, I wouldn't bother spending much money on a whole fleet of wedges, though some might argue otherwise.
Putter: I have a brother who plays with a Champion Sparkplug putter that looks like a sparkplug on the end of the shaft. He bought it at a garage sale for $1. He is one of the best putters I have played with. I have a $120 Ping Craz-E putter that I love. I think you could learn to putt with a tree limb. Try em out and see what feels "right" to you.

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My wife bought me a set of Acuity Turbo Plus clubs for $250 about a year ago and they worked great (except for the driver!). I used them for a while and then bought one club and iron set at a time... The bottom line is, don't spend a huge amount of cash until you know what fits you. Like many people have said, it depends on the person and what fits YOU best. I spent $350 on my $600 set of Callaway irons.. but the only difference for me is a little accuracy and about 15 yards per club. As a beginner that really doesn't matter $600 worth...

Play a while with a basic set and then form your club set as required.

-P

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#1--Get fitted for your clubs. This is more than important. Alot of stores do it for free without purchase. Then try some in the store and don't buy anything yet. Go out with a friend and share a bag. Or rent clubs for your round and try different ones. It's much better than dropping a bunch of $$ on something you might not like by being impatient or hearing a couple of good reviews. This game gets EXPENSIVE, as anyone here can tell you. If money isn't an issue, try to spend more on lessons than clubs for a while. Try out different clubs of all kinds/brands. You need to find clubs that feel right for you. There are ALOT of choices out there.You can spend hundreds or thousands on a set and it doesn't mean they are right for you. Shop around, every person and every club is different.

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I just went through what you are. I decided on an adams 13 piece set of the A30S. Got them on ebay new for a lil over $450. I'm VERY happy with them so far.

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I also went thru the same thing 6 mos ago. I ended up with clubs I could not hit very well CG Golds. Anyway, try to buy local ebay has too many fake clubs and being new you may not notice if they are fake. I hear friends complain about counterfeits. If you do, get the serial number from the seller and call to verify they are real.

I can make you a great deal on some cg golds + 1/2 long reg :)

Got myself a deal on some ping g-10 sweeeeettttttt :)

Hit lots of clubs to demo as well

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Bow-tie Guy,

Some of the best advice you got comes from:
#1--Get fitted for your clubs. This is more than important. Alot of stores do it for free without purchase. Then try some in the store and don't buy anything yet. .

You might want to start with a group class, and just one or two clubs. Then, if you feel comfortable with the instructor, get individual lessons from that person.

For the early-going, buy a cavity-backed, regular-flex-shafted demonstrator 6-iron. Demonstators are good-quality test clubs the manufacturers send out to the golf shops, and the shops sell them when new models come out. Starting with one club will help you learn the basic set-up and swing sequence. Having all 14 clubs at the beginning can be a distraction. Some shops have pros that give lessons. After your swing starts to take shape, you could get fitted for clubs that match your body build, strength and swing type. They can also give you advice on what type of golf ball you might want to use. Golf shops get a lot of clubs as trade-ins, and need to sell them to get their money back. For your first set, get some brand-name used clubs that aren't too beat up, and which meet your swing needs. Avoid shops that try to force you to buy something in five minutes. Hope this helps. I see you're in St. Louis, and the area has lots of good golf shops, both on-course and in shopping centers.

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Bow-tie Guy,

Getting individual lessons is a great idea. The instructor might see some things that don't come up in a golf fitting.

My only advice is to buy a quality set. I first bought a cheap set and was never happy with them or my golf game. This affected how much time I would go to the course. I finally bought a better set and found that I play a lot more. Play with friends, sign up for some scrambles at your local muni, and see what others have and hit their clubs. You might find that you prefer one brand or model over another.

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OK - I'll go against the grain here and recommend NOT getting fitted at this point, unless you are outside the range of "normal" for height and weight. The reason why I recommend you wait is that, at this point, your swing will be all over the map. At some point, getting fitted would be great, but I know plenty of highly-skilled golfers swinging off-the-rack clubs. But, taking a class or getting lessons? That is really smart.

So, where to start with the clubs. First, if possible, could you borrow some clubs for your 1st few classes? After a couple of classes hitting borrowed clubs, you should have a much better feel for what clubs you'll want.

Next, you can carry up to 14 clubs in your bag, but I would keep things simple at first until you've had a few classes or lessons and had the chance to play a couple of rounds. There are the basic clubs, but each person has his/her own tastes in different combos of wedges, woods, hybrids, etc... Your choice in these clubs will need to suite who you are as a player. My neighbor swears by his hybrid 3 and 4, my brother in law couldn't live without his 2 iron, and I like my 7 wood and extra wedges. And, that will change as I progress as a golfer. Because of this, I wouldn't worry too much about things beyond the "basics". For irons, a set that starts with either a 3 or 4 iron through pitching wedge, and a sand wedge would be a good start. A putter, and then a 3 wood. Later, you can add a driver, once you've gained some experience.

I started out with an 9-piece irons set from Adams (4-9 iron, with PW, GW and SW), then a 3 wood and putter. After practice and lessons, I added in a 60* lob wedge, my driver and a 7 wood. Depending on your game, the courses you play, etc... you may want to have fewer wedges and no 7 wood, but a couple of hybrids instead. Its just a lot easier to make that decision once you've played a bit more.

As far as where to get your clubs, I would avoid eBay for now. You can get some great deals, but you'll need to avoid the frauds and you will need to really know what you want. But, used is always a great option. Not sure about where you live, but if you have a golf retail store like Golf Galaxy, check out their used club selection. Play It Again Sports can also be a great option, as is your local Craig's list. The key here is that you are able to hold the club before buying (hitting it would be even better). I would recommend sticking with a name-brand, though. Chances are pretty good that you'll be selling these clubs within a year. Either you'll love golf and will want clubs more suited to your game as it develops, or you'll bail on golf. Either way, selling older name-brand clubs is a LOT easier than moving no-name clubs.

Parting advice - start small, then build out your clubs as you experience grows. Learn how to swing a club first and learn how a golf club works. Then, fill out your bag and enjoy!

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Note: This thread is 3764 days old. We appreciate that you found this thread instead of starting a new one, but if you plan to post here please make sure it's still relevant. If not, please start a new topic. Thank you!

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