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newtogolf

When to hit the course

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I was inspired to take lessons after playing in a memorial tournament for a friend who passed on 9/11. Other than for a trip to Myrtle Beach 8 years ago, I've never played golf, nor never took any lessons. After the touranment, I was so frustrated and embarrassed I decided I was either going to learn how to play right or not play again until I did.

I've taken three lessons over the last three weeks and spent about 4 hours per week at the range practicing mostly with my irons and just this week my driver. I'm pretty consistent at the range, but do have the occassional top off, shank, and slice.

I don't want a repeat of my tournament experience, but I also realize that a course is much different from a range, and that I eventually need to get out on one. Living on Long Island, NY, most courses are crowded, and most of the people I know are good golfers which is a bit intimidating.

Should I take a few more lessons and spend some more time at the range to become more consistent, or should I pick a weekday and get on a course for some real experience? Is it usually more crowded in the early am or twi-light? Thanks for the advice in advance.

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Are there any par-3 or executive courses near you? These are good warmups before you tackle the big courses. If you do play at a regular course, twilight is generally the least crowded.

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Are there any par-3 or executive courses near you? These are good warmups before you tackle the big courses. If you do play at a regular course, twilight is generally the least crowded.

i agree with what harmonious say about par 3 if available, if not whn u r on the range take the approach if u were playing a round, tee up a 3w and hit it, then hit 6 iron, then hit a wedge then next hole approach, go 5w, 5iron, 9iron, sw so forth and so on u get the idea, just mix it up, but treat it like a round, so mully, u hit fat tee shot, dont tee up again

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Thanks guys, I didn't even think about the Par 3 courses, great suggestion.

gilbo:
The pro I'm taking lessons from suggested I practice at the range as you suggested in your post. I tried it yesterday, which is what led me to the question today, since I doubt my ball on a real course will always land in a nice flat mat lay.

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As long as you move and keep up with the pace of play, I don't see anything. wrong with playing some of the muni courses. I know plenty of guys who shoot in the 100s who play them.

In nassau, Chirstopher Morely is flat little par 3 course. Eisenhower is relatively flat and you can catch 9 on white or blue usually in the afternoons.

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I'm of the belief that hitting the range is good practice, but playing 18(or even 9) is the best practice because you are working on actual games situations with different variables.

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i'm pretty new to the game and on LI as well. you should try the Par 3 course in Flushing, it's great practice. full 18 holes and the longest holes are 80yds. great for working out our short game. it's open 8am to 11pm i think (it's lit!) and a pretty casual environment. if you're playing as a single or double and it's not too busy, you can usually play two balls and no one will complain. i also like to practice chips and bump-n-runs (haven't found many places on LI good for this) after I finish a hole if there's no one behind me or i'm waiting for a group ahead.

you do tee off of mats, but everything in between is real grass, so you can get some good practice hitting out of the thicker stuff. i prefer it over executive courses for now, since I can focus on my approach shots, pitching, chipping, and putting, without worrying about the long game and hitting off the tee.

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Note: This thread is 3741 days old. We appreciate that you found this thread instead of starting a new one, but if you plan to post here please make sure it's still relevant. If not, please start a new topic. Thank you!

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