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I'm not sure if offset is the correct term, but I know there are two types off hosels on putters(example below). I am looking to buy a blade putter, but I'm not sure which type is the right for me. I'm not necessarily going to buy an odyssey blade putter, but here are the two types of putters i was talking about below





so now you now which type I'm talking about, i'll tell you my main question.

Is there any reason besides looks on why you would chose one type or the other? If so, how do you determine which type of offset is for you.

Thanks

also if you can't answer my main question, what are some blade putters you like and reccommend. There are so many types, I am having a hard time deciding on one.

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If you employ a forward press in your putting stroke, you'll want a putter with less offset (Newport 1.5). If you don't employ much of a forward press in your stroke, you'll want a putter with more offset (Newport 2.0) to get your hands in front of the ball.
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I play with a putter that has minimal offset, similar to your second photo. I recommend it because it is cheaper that those black series putters above, and the tour model i have has a firmer insert that the white hot xg model.
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The main difference in hosel (known as the "neck") on putters is the amount of toe hang each will cause. If you hold your putter horizontal and balance the shaft on one finger to let the putter head hang naturally, you'll be able to tell how much toe hang the putter has. The putter head can hang at pretty much any angle. The more the putter hangs down (moves more toward being vertical), the more toe hang it has. The more toe hang a putter has, the more it wants to open/close during the putting stroke.

The reason for different toe hang is to fit different puttingr strokes. A putter that's face stays parallel to the ground is known a "face-balanced" and typically better for someone with a "straight back straight through" putting stroke inwhich they want the face to stay absolutely perpendicular to their putting line. Someone with a gated putting stroke (think of a gate opening and closing on a hinge) will want a putter with a lot of toe hang. Someone that has trouble with short putts might want less toe hang so that they have a better ability to keep the putter face square to the ball on a shart stroke. The reasons go on and on concerning what type of toe hang you'd need.

As for the necks you posted above, the standard plumber's-neck (the first one) typically hangs at a a 45* angle and is a good fit for a majority of golfers. The flow neck (second picture) typically has more toe hang (about 60*+) and is better for people that open and close the putter more during their stroke. That being said, the location of where the neck meets the putter head and the actual length of the neck itself can alter the amount of toe hang. I have a Scotty Cameron JLM Tour putter ( here's a link ) that is a blade-style head (typically has more toe hang) with a plumber's neck, but the toe hang on that putter is around 30*. At the end of the day, you really have to test the putter out to see how it hangs.
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Note: This thread is 3973 days old. We appreciate that you found this thread instead of starting a new one, but if you plan to post here please make sure it's still relevant. If not, please start a new topic. Thank you!

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