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Gym and Golf = better game?


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I like to swim, surf, bodysurf. surfings amazing for your lower back but I wouldnt do any of those without SERIOUS stretching. A little before after youre warm and a TON of stretching after. My game is 1000 times better when I've been swimming/stretching and especially if I get some yoga in.
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If I were working out strictly for golf I'd would concentrate on strengthening my core and adding flexibility. Inclusive with 'core' would be abs, btw. Earlier this year I went through a round of P90X. Loved the core workout and the ab workout. I hated the yoga workout but I bet that yoga workout did more good for me (I'm not real flexible) than the others. I felt that those 3 workouts were really helpful for golf (and softball). In my next round of P90X, I hope to miss that yoga workout less often (even though I hated it).
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I did P90X and ate better between November 1st and June 1st and went from 195 lbs. to 160. My body fat % is probably down to like 12% or less at this point, I'm not really sure (I'm 6 feet). I definitely got a lot stronger too since when I started I could only do maybe 1 pull-up. Now I can do sets of about 12. That's a pretty huge improvement. The P90X program itself is actually very geared towards the golfer looking to improve core strength, fast twitch muscle fibers, flexibility, and endurance. I recommend it to a lot of friends and family.

As far as becoming a better golfer afterwards, my personal experience with making a drastic body change for the better was this: I was a bad golfer before working out, and I was a bad golfer after working out! I have heard though of good players gaining distance after a few months of working out. If you're already a bad player though, the gym isn't going to help you much. The only thing that has really made me a better golfer -- or rather, given me the opportunity to eventually become a good golfer -- is Stack and Tilt. Their teaching method speaks to me like no other method out there.
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I thought P90X helped my golf in two ways. I had less body fat to get in the way (went from 167lbs to 150) and because of the core work and yoga I just felt like I could make a turn better. I have lower back issues and my lower back got much better (which also helped with flexibility). Basically I just felt more free and smooth when swinging a softball bat of golf club. I didn't state it because P90X is all consuming but I would recommend it as well as a good workout/lifestyle for golf.
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I didn't state it because P90X is

It really is. I completely cut off my social life in order to do P90X. The eating better part was the biggest sacrifice because it meant no more Happy Hour and no more going out to eat or take out. Cooking everything and preparing everything the night before was actually pretty fun, but time-consuming for sure.

And then the workouts themselves require you to A) always get at least 7 hours of sleep every night, no exceptions and B) always set aside, really, about 90-110 minutes a day to get them done. People typically quit after the 3rd week or so. About 10-20% though survive for the 90 days and beyond. I lasted about 220 days. I plan on doing another round when golf season ends due to winter. It really helps pass the time during those cold winter months though.
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thats an excuse i hear all to often "i don't want to get jacked' believe me, if you don't want to, and you don't push yourself 150% you are NOT going to get jacked. i don't care if you go in and do your excercises every day.

This is so true. You have to eat perfect and be extremely dedicated to exercising until failure.

Which is painful, which is discouraging.
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I am thinking about doing some gym work to strengthen my lower back as I have had issues with it for the last year or so.

yoga is the best workout you can do for golf. especially if you have back issues. i'd suggest some type of warmed room yoga.

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Lifting's my favorite thing to do. In fact, I may have to retire from golf if these nagging injuries don't go away because they are hurting my lifting. Pretty sure the pains were all from when I used to swing way too hard and that they'll be gone in the offseason. If not, I'm done.

Anyways, some great lower back exercises:
Squat, Deadlift, Glute-Ham Raises, Good Mornings, and Back extensions are probably my favorites.

I'm not sure what the best lifts would be to improve the golf swing, however. My guess would be something more explosive, like power cleans or kettlebell swings. Power cleans aren't very easy to learn on your own. Find and Oly coach if you want to use those. KB swings can be picked up easily.
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It really is. I completely cut off my social life in order to do P90X. The eating better part was the biggest sacrifice because it meant no more Happy Hour and no more going out to eat or take out. Cooking everything and preparing everything the night before was actually pretty fun, but time-consuming for sure.

This is no different than any workout program. It's not just a P90x thing other than seeing your buddies at the gym. The bottom line is, if you want to get in shape and stay in shape, you have to make a lifestyle change. No diets, no 3 month workout plans, etc...It has to be a lifestyle change or chances are you will end up being just like you were. The sleep is something that is required when lifting no matter what you are doing. Eating right is usually required with getting fit (I say usually because some guys are just genetically built to be fit and can eat what they want with no consequence). The people that quit are the ones that get gym memberships and go "workout" but spend most of the time talking instead of working out. The P90x pushes you and doesn't allow you to just sit around talking while allowing your heart rate to drop. Very good program IMO.

This is so true. You have to eat perfect and be extremely dedicated to exercising until failure.

Exactly. So many people think that if you go to the gym and start lifting weights that you are going to get big. It doesn't work like that. The guys that put on a lot of muscle do so because of their diets and supplements. You must take in x amount of calories with x amount of protein and x amount of carbs to get that look. It's all about the macros at that level.

And I can't believe anyone would boast about "lifting heavy" and then turn around and say they don't do dead lifts. Dead lifts are one of the most beneficial compound exercises that exists. I can understand if you have back problems, but there are ways around that and still be able to do deads.
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This is no different than any workout program. It's not just a P90x thing other than seeing your buddies at the gym. The bottom line is, if you want to get in shape and stay in shape, you have to make a lifestyle change.

I agree with what you are saying. I think each individual has to find what works for them. For

me , regimented workouts tend to work. Right now, it's P90X. Before that I did Body For Life and there are times when I've designed and planned my own workout, created plans with friends, etc. Some folks don't need all the regimented, planned out workouts. I have a good friend that is always in great shape, works out all the time, etc. He never has a plan, just works what he feels like when he feels like it. He knows what he's doing in the gym (and with all the cardio he does), he just doesn't plan or record it. That works for him, not for me. To bring the discussion back to the OP's question. Notice that several of us have mentioned Yoga being good for golf. It really is (and it can be good for your back as well). I really hate doing the yoga in P90X but I'm going to do it because I know I need it.
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I agree with what you are saying. I think each individual has to find what works for them. For

Exactly. But I can tell you that standing around at the gym talking is not going to work for anyone. Yoga is very good from what I have heard. I am going to start as soon as I get off my butt.

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Exactly. But I can tell you that standing around at the gym talking is not going to work for anyone. Yoga is very good from what I have heard. I am going to start as soon as I get off my butt.

One thing I like about P90X is that I can do it at home. I spend some $$ on dumbbells but it's a good tradeoff for me since most of the time when I'm working out it's 10pm after I get my kids to bed. I was always one to go to the gym to workout but you are right that there are lots of people in a gym who are most there to socialize.

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I got to get into yoga, my whole lower back were my glut meet is totally messed up. I use to be able to touch my toes doing a hamstring stretch, now my back wont let me bend that far. There's no pain, its just imobility. It doesn't affect my golf swing at all.
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I got to get into yoga, my whole lower back were my glut meet is totally messed up. I use to be able to touch my toes doing a hamstring stretch, now my back wont let me bend that far. There's no pain, its just imobility. It doesn't affect my golf swing at all.

You and me both as far as touching your toes. My problem is I have never stretched much or anything and my hamstrings have gotten so tight. That is one reason I am going to start yoga. I have the P90x stuff and I am just going to use that yoga workout for now.

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Lower back exercises: deadlifts, good mornings, back extensions/hyperextensions. Squats aren't really a lower back exercise, but they pretty much work EVERYTHING in your body. You have to make sure that you're doing these lifts with proper form however. It's crucial. Deadlifts and squats are great exercises, but doing them wrong can mess you up for a long time.

On th P90X note, I did the program a year or two ago and it is really good. However, I really have to mention that people may not be painting the clearest picture here as to how hard it is and how much dedication it takes. This program is going to take about 1.5 hours of your time daily (6-7 days a week), so just be ready for it. The workouts are also very intense (you can do them at a slower pace if you want). Overall it's a great routine for getting back into shape for sports and the like. I'm not sure whether I would recommend it long-term though, since I find it to be a bit of an overkill. The YogaX routine they have (as well as the stretching routine) are really good. They aren't very many peoples' favorites (I was almost never motivated to do YogaX, but forced myself to anyway), but they really do you a world of good. As far as eating healthy and sleeping goes, that really has nothing to do with P90X. Any exercise program should be supplemented with those two things, and they should actually be an every day thing for anyone, gym or not. Eating healthy and sleeping right are just things that you should do if you want to be healthy.

For golf, I'd agree with the more explosive exercises as well as focusing on your core and rotator cuffs. Core exercises would be: squats, standing press, bench press, deadlifts, bent over rows. You can also throw in power cleans which are an amazing exercise, but you really have to learn the technique (which isn't easy) properly. Build a routine around those core exercises with some secondary stuff like bicep curls, dips (awesome exercise), pullups/chinups (awesome as well), lateral raises, leg presses/curls, calf raises, and some ab exercises.

Typically you have two choices. Either do a full body routine (which usually take longer, but are a great choice for beginners and people that know what they're doing), or split up your routines into muscle groups (i.e., one day for Back and Biceps; one for Chest, Shoulders and Triceps; one for Legs).

I personally don't do squats anymore (yes I know it's THE exercise) since my legs grew so much that I had to get a whole new wardrobe and couldn't find any pants that would fit or look good. I stick to cardio and sports mostly for my legs now.

In sum, I think what will help your golf most are core exercises, as well as a routine which promotes flexibility (such as Yoga or stretching).

Cheers,
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I'm just starting a golf specific workout. I did football specific/powerlifting type training for the last 15yrs and it's definitely not working for the golf swing. I'm 34 now and the heavy lifting is rough on the body, so I'm going for more flexibility and rotational core type exercises. Right now I'm 6'0" 253lbs and have zero flexibility, my "full turn" is probably 30* short of parallel. I feel very tight and inflexible when playing golf and would like to work to get some flexibility back. I'd like to get down to 240lbs which is a pretty healthy weight for me, and should help get the gut out of the way as well.

I've been following a routine in a golf workout book for a few days, it's amazing how much easier it is to get to the top of the swing after some stretching and basic "core" exercises. Don't even know how to name them, but basically a lot of laying on the ground and rotating one leg over the other trying to touch the ground with your top knee, or sitting on the ground with your knees to your chest and rotating from side to side touching the ground with a medicine ball. These workouts aren't really "tough", but because I have to work at being flexible enough to even touch the ground they are challenging. Lots of oblique stretching as well.

I also have a touchy lower back and find that the golf swing itself will aggravate it, regardless of how much strengthening I've done. I do find that straight leg deadlifts and hyperextensions keep it healthy in everyday situations, plus they stretch the hamstrings which seems to help keep my back loose as well. As far as working out to increase distance, I can only think of lat pull downs and maybe some forearm work specifically. I personally think that flexibility in all parts of the body far outweighs any kind of strength gains as far as hitting the ball a long way.
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