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Should a Beginner Use a High-Quality Ball Like a Pro V1?

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Originally Posted by Maverick

no, but if you got money to burn..why not.  Pro V's do feel great off the face of all the clubs..just feels like a punch in your gut when it goes in the water.  If you are hacking away right now..I say hack away with some Rock Flite's..you won't know the difference yet.



lol Why do people use the term 'Rock Flites'. I know several people that use the D2 Gamer that would take your money, and mine, without trying.

OP, you can play what you want but it's not going to be the better ball for your game simply because it is a "good ball". You're getting nothing more out of the Pro V than you would a Top Flite at 18 handicap. I also venture to doubt that you're able to get great "feel" of the ball at 20hc as well. You may be noticing a different touch with your putter, but the average 20hc is not going to be able to tell one ball from another in most cases, when using their irons and driver. At 15-20+ hc you're also most likely not able to shape the ball, create spin on command, or even command the club speed needed to get the most out of a tour ball. A 2 piece ball is just fine for anyone in double-digits, or the weekend golfer. You are definitely right in that aspect.

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I could not find this topic (though I suspect it must be well worn around here) so I have started this thread.

I am wondering what concrete effects expensive golf balls have on the quality and distance of your strokes.  I have been using the single layer cheapie balls mainly because my budget does not smile at decorating ponds with expensive balls.  In fact, at my request, my wife got my some good Titleists (soft 3-layer).  But the box remains unopened because I just don't know when is a good time to lose them.  Oops, I mean "use" them.

Club speed for driver is 95-102 typically, so I get some good long shots, though my handicap is a bit over 20 still, so you can imagine I am looking to stop spraying my drives.  In a sense, I am looking for advice as well, I suppose.  What ball do you like?  Why?  Do you have evidence, or is it a gut feeling (not judging here, I just want to know)?  Does budget play a role in your preference?

Edited by Cantankerish

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Play anything you want. It's your pocket book. 

One thing to remember is that the golf ball does not make the golfer play, or score better. The golfer's swing is what makes the golf ball fly better for better play, and  those lower scores.

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1 hour ago, Cantankerish said:

Does budget play a role in your preference?

It absolutely does, I'm not made of money.  That said, I don't play premium balls as at my skill level, I don't get the benefit of the additional spin and control (and cost), not to mention that I plan my shots for that.  I generally use Bridgestone e6; it feels good, spins enough (hop and stop with a wedge and depending on the green can stop within a couple yards of a pitch mark with a long iron), and is well priced. I don't play those low spinny check-once-and-stop pitches that you see on tour.  I play bump and runs and when I hit pitches/half wedges I plan for a bit of rollout.  

Basically what @Patch said, the differences in performance will be on well struck shots.  If you thin one, the balls gonna fly low and roll, no matter what ball you use.  And if you hit a wedge perfectly, the ball will spin enough to stop quick (some quicker than others), again no matter what ball.  If you have a consistent strike pattern, sure some balls will perform better than others for you.  But they won't fix fats, thins, open/closed faces, and swing path problems.  Remember my comment on pitch marks?  I need to do my part to give the ball a chance at making one...

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54 minutes ago, Foot Wedge said:

It absolutely does, I'm not made of money.  That said, I don't play premium balls as at my skill level, I don't get the benefit of the additional spin and control (and cost), not to mention that I plan my shots for that.  I generally use Bridgestone e6; it feels good, spins enough (hop and stop with a wedge and depending on the green can stop within a couple yards of a pitch mark with a long iron), and is well priced. I don't play those low spinny check-once-and-stop pitches that you see on tour.  I play bump and runs and when I hit pitches/half wedges I plan for a bit of rollout.  

Basically what @Patch said, the differences in performance will be on well struck shots.  If you thin one, the balls gonna fly low and roll, no matter what ball you use.  And if you hit a wedge perfectly, the ball will spin enough to stop quick (some quicker than others), again no matter what ball.  If you have a consistent strike pattern, sure some balls will perform better than others for you.  But they won't fix fats, thins, open/closed faces, and swing path problems.  Remember my comment on pitch marks?  I need to do my part to give the ball a chance at making one...

This feels like good advice.  In fact, this thread is what I had been looking for.  Thank you all.

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I did play a higher quality ball when my game was much better, (and we played for money) but now at 67 years old and having had three back surgeries, plus I am now retired, I use a lower quality, inexpensive ball. To tell the truth as stated above by many, at our skill level it doesn't make that much of a difference. But find a ball you like, use the same ball each round, I mark mine so I know it is mine when looking in the woods. I know a lot will disagree with my selection but I play TaylorMade Noodles. I like the distance I get and they feel pretty good. I also got two boxes of twelve each for $10.00 a box on Rock Bottoms Golf, (plus shipping and tax). I don't mind hitting a $1.00 ball into the water, although I am pissed that I hit it in the water in the first place. Good luck with your search, there are many to chose from.

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20 hours ago, cooke119 said:

I did play a higher quality ball when my game was much better, (and we played for money) but now at 67 years old and having had three back surgeries, plus I am now retired, I use a lower quality, inexpensive ball. To tell the truth as stated above by many, at our skill level it doesn't make that much of a difference. But find a ball you like, use the same ball each round, I mark mine so I know it is mine when looking in the woods. I know a lot will disagree with my selection but I play TaylorMade Noodles. I like the distance I get and they feel pretty good. I also got two boxes of twelve each for $10.00 a box on Rock Bottoms Golf, (plus shipping and tax). I don't mind hitting a $1.00 ball into the water, although I am pissed that I hit it in the water in the first place. Good luck with your search, there are many to chose from.

Balls like Q Star tour and TM Project A are nice middle of the road options. Let's face it, even if you don't need it, it's fun to see the ball check up on the green. If money is an issue, try Cut, Snell, MG, Vice etc for online direct to consumer options. 

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On 4/25/2011 at 6:46 AM, boogielicious said:

One add I would have is to stick to the same ball, which ever you choose, for the whole season.  You get very used to how that ball will play around the greens and how it will fly.

This. I buy the wilson duo, on sale, 36 for $50. Two thing I have learned in my short time. 1. A $5.00 ball sinks as quickly as a $0.50 ball. 2. If it's not my ball in the water, I leave it there.

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Titleist would certainly tell you that you should.  I would say that it depends.  If you suffer from a slice or hook, its only going to be made worse with a ball like the ProV.  More backspin also means potentially more sidespin.

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I kind of find it funny that people consider "non-premium" golf balls as being lower quality. Pretty sure all golf balls made by major manufacturers are high quality - they're just made of different materials and to different specs.

For someone who is new to the game or just loses many balls in general, I usually recommend playing a cheaper ball just for financial reasons. If you can't discern the performance difference from one ball to another there's no reason to buy the more expensive ones.

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On ‎11‎/‎19‎/‎2011 at 2:44 AM, Spyder said:

 

 

 

 

lol Why do people use the term 'Rock Flites'. I know several people that use the D2 Gamer that would take your money, and mine, without trying.

 

 

 

 

 

OP, you can play what you want but it's not going to be the better ball for your game simply because it is a "good ball". You're getting nothing more out of the Pro V than you would a Top Flite at 18 handicap. I also venture to doubt that you're able to get great "feel" of the ball at 20hc as well. You may be noticing a different touch with your putter, but the average 20hc is not going to be able to tell one ball from another in most cases, when using their irons and driver. At 15-20+ hc you're also most likely not able to shape the ball, create spin on command, or even command the club speed needed to get the most out of a tour ball. A 2 piece ball is just fine for anyone in double-digits, or the weekend golfer. You are definitely right in that aspect.

The term Rock Flight started back in the 70's.  They were very hard back then.  Lee Trevino endorsed them for a minute or two.  If you could compress that ball, it would go a long, long way. If you didn't it felt like hitting a rock. You surely didn't want to use them in cool or colder weather.   I use the Top Flight D2+ Feel pretty much for everyday play now and will use the Titleist Pro V1 in tournaments this year.

If you're just starting to play, go with the Rock Flights and as your game improves...play what you want to play.

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On ‎2‎/‎1‎/‎2019 at 5:09 PM, Cantankerish said:

I could not find this topic (though I suspect it must be well worn around here) so I have started this thread.

I am wondering what concrete effects expensive golf balls have on the quality and distance of your strokes.  I have been using the single layer cheapie balls mainly because my budget does not smile at decorating ponds with expensive balls.  In fact, at my request, my wife got my some good Titleists (soft 3-layer).  But the box remains unopened because I just don't know when is a good time to lose them.  Oops, I mean "use" them.

Club speed for driver is 95-102 typically, so I get some good long shots, though my handicap is a bit over 20 still, so you can imagine I am looking to stop spraying my drives.  In a sense, I am looking for advice as well, I suppose.  What ball do you like?  Why?  Do you have evidence, or is it a gut feeling (not judging here, I just want to know)?  Does budget play a role in your preference?

I use recylced (not refinished) myself. Just got 24 "B" grade Bridgestone e6 for £8.99 delivered. Sure, they dont look as shiny as new balls (or pearl lake balls for that matter) but they are in good nick and feel decent and in fact better than the cheapo balls i had been playing.

If you are a budget golfer like me you can make some great savings on top brand golf balls by going down the recycled/lake ball route.

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9 minutes ago, RussUK said:

I use recylced (not refinished) myself. Just got 24 "B" grade Bridgestone e6 for £8.99 delivered. Sure, they dont look as shiny as new balls (or pearl lake balls for that matter) but they are in good nick and feel decent and in fact better than the cheapo balls i had been playing.

If you are a budget golfer like me you can make some great savings on top brand golf balls by going down the recycled/lake ball route.

Really?  I think I would be dubious about lake balls.  Hard to argue with the price you got, but I have hit dead balls before, and I imagine that lake balls are suspect #1 for that condition.

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1 minute ago, Cantankerish said:

Really?  I think I would be dubious about lake balls.  Hard to argue with the price you got, but I have hit dead balls before, and I imagine that lake balls are suspect #1 for that condition.

Never had a problem. As long as you get them from one of the main companies. Place i buy them from here in the UK gets them from the US. The lakes/ponds etc. are cleared out once or twice a week so they dont stay in the water long.

Modern balls a pretty resiliant little spheres :-D

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On ‎2‎/‎3‎/‎2019 at 8:40 AM, Sandhills Golfe said:

Balls like Q Star tour and TM Project A are nice middle of the road options. Let's face it, even if you don't need it, it's fun to see the ball check up on the green. If money is an issue, try Cut, Snell, MG, Vice etc for online direct to consumer options. 

Thanks, I'll check them out too.

On ‎2‎/‎3‎/‎2019 at 10:14 AM, billchao said:

I kind of find it funny that people consider "non-premium" golf balls as being lower quality. Pretty sure all golf balls made by major manufacturers are high quality - they're just made of different materials and to different specs.

For someone who is new to the game or just loses many balls in general, I usually recommend playing a cheaper ball just for financial reasons. If you can't discern the performance difference from one ball to another there's no reason to buy the more expensive ones.

Good point.

 

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Being an average golfer, I find a good ball is durable, easy to find if I miss the fairway, looks good(dimple pattern/count), is the right size (distance balls look smaller to me, which i don't like), has a 'soft' feel, and goes on sale at Dick's, which is good if you lose a lot of them. These days, it might be easier to list the balls to avoid (like Slazanger Raw Distance).  

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Don’t waste money on second hand balls just to play a brand name. They where probably at the bottom of a pond for six months. There are a bunch of great ball on the market for 20 or less a dozen. Check out Wilson Duo 

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