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Titleist Vokey owners...


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just a heads up for anyone else that may come across vokey wedges on Ebay or something...some of the loft/bounce stamps are done in white...the OPs pictures have the correct paintfill in the loft/bounce stamp for the 56 and 60.

That said I never trust EBAY for anything equipment wise for obvious reasons.  I would rather pay for the satisfaction that I have the real thing than save some money and always wonder a little bit.

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Originally Posted by hokiebound

I purchased a 52, 56, and 60 today. Very happy with them all.

Now how do you all go about cleaning these things? I have a two sided brush one with a softer side and one with a copper side. Would I screw up the spin milled grooves using the copper side?

Here is what I mean.



Seeming as nobody replied to the original question I shall... I would never use the abrasive side of those cleaners, it will scratch and wear the face of your club and if you are worried about rust then definitely dont use that! I clean my mp-29's with a soft toothbrush and wd-40 with a linen free cloth. The wd-40 will clean of any rust there is and the tooth brush will ensure it doesnt scratch off the chrome (you wont have the chrome problem but you see where i am going...).

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  • 3 weeks later...
Hank Haney's take on it [QUOTE]More spin w rust RT @kjadams76: @HankDHaney do you think vokey oil can wedges work better when covered in rust?[/QUOTE]
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Quote:
Originally Posted by benredik View Post

Hank Haney's take on it

Quote:
More spin w rust RT @kjadams76: @HankDHaney do you think vokey oil can wedges work better when covered in rust?

Thanks for sharing. It allowed me to respond. ;-)

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So there is more spin with rust after all? lol

Nope. Don't take your equipment advice from Hank Haney.

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Cleaning - On course I just wet and use the nylon side of the brush.  Cleans pretty easy.  If you don't have water, then spit will work.  I actually took the brass bristles off my brush because they always catch on something.

Off course, dish soap and water.  A quick dunk and scrub with the nylon brushes works fine.

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  • 9 months later...

The rust debate - has been done so many times.

I know people who buy raw wedges want to believe it. But rust interferes with the grooves, and typically rust will disappear with the first hit on the face - unless of course, one hits it all over the face.

:-)

But if there is any effect, it is negligible, and renders the grooves meaningless.

As to CC Vokeys - lots of mediocre comments on the net about them, and there is a reason Vokey redesigned the wedge and grooves, heat treated them for endurance, and introduced the SM4 and three grinds for almost every loft. For a few more bucks, get the SM4.

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um billiards...boom!   Chalk is specifically designed to enhance spin on each and every shot.  Soft, flaky powder.  Get your head on straight.

Short answer: chalk isn't the same as rust, and the differences are drastic enough that they cannot be compared in this capacity.

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um billiards...boom!   Chalk is specifically designed to enhance spin on each and every shot.  Soft, flaky powder.  Get your head on straight.

No, it actually isn't. Chalk is irrelevant if you hit the cueball in the middle.  Chalk is used to even-out off-center hits on the cueball. The purpose chalk serves is so that when you want to spin the cueball, you can hit the cueball on an edge (not in the center) and have some predictability in the shot (Because the chalk will grab the cueball and prolong your contact, allowing you to hit the ball much harder on the edge and still get spin).  However, the chalk itself does not add spin.  I suppose you could use rust in the same way, but it is not very often (Read: never) that you would hit a golf ball purposefully on the toe and rely on the rust to grab the ball so it doesn't fly out at an angle.  Chalk doesn't add spin in pool, it simply makes you able to control shots with spin (because you are hitting the edge of the cueball).  The more chalk you add, the more to the side of the cueball you can hit with a greater margin for error.  So, while it seems like the chalk is increasing the spin, it isn't, its simply allowing you to hit further to the edge of the cueball and still control the shot.  Striking outside the center of the cueball is what actually adds the spin, not the chalk.  However, you need chalk to control high-spin shots.  It is not adding spin though - the ball will spin just as much without chalk as with, it will just be much harder to control.

There is no comparison between golf and pool in this context, unless you add spin to your golf shots by hitting the ball outside the grooves on the edge of the ball, which is insane.  A pool cue is flat, so you can only add spin by hitting the edge and literally spinning it like a basketball on your finger.  You don't do that in golf.  I actually do think that if you spun a golf ball in the same way you spun a billiard ball (by hitting it barely on the toe and spinning it like a top by not hitting the ball square) rust would help.  But that isn't how golf spin works / is generated.  Similarly, you could add grooves to the end of a pool cue and strike the shot in the middle, but that isn't the spin billiard players want.  If the pool cue had grooves and you "spun" by hitting it square and allowing the grooves to grab, chalk would be irrelevant.

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keep them clean, brush them every single time you use them. failing that, when you clean them at home, rub them down with a little baby oil. that should slow down the metal's oxydizing tendencies. vokeys are great

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  • 3 weeks later...

Originally Posted by johnclayton1982

No, it actually isn't. Chalk is irrelevant if you hit the cueball in the middle.  Chalk is used to even-out off-center hits on the cueball. The purpose chalk serves is so that when you want to spin the cueball, you can hit the cueball on an edge (not in the center) and have some predictability in the shot (Because the chalk will grab the cueball and prolong your contact, allowing you to hit the ball much harder on the edge and still get spin).  However, the chalk itself does not add spin.  I suppose you could use rust in the same way, but it is not very often (Read: never) that you would hit a golf ball purposefully on the toe and rely on the rust to grab the ball so it doesn't fly out at an angle.  Chalk doesn't add spin in pool, it simply makes you able to control shots with spin (because you are hitting the edge of the cueball).  The more chalk you add, the more to the side of the cueball you can hit with a greater margin for error.  So, while it seems like the chalk is increasing the spin, it isn't, its simply allowing you to hit further to the edge of the cueball and still control the shot.  Striking outside the center of the cueball is what actually adds the spin, not the chalk.  However, you need chalk to control high-spin shots.  It is not adding spin though - the ball will spin just as much without chalk as with, it will just be much harder to control.

There is no comparison between golf and pool in this context, unless you add spin to your golf shots by hitting the ball outside the grooves on the edge of the ball, which is insane.  A pool cue is flat, so you can only add spin by hitting the edge and literally spinning it like a basketball on your finger.  You don't do that in golf.  I actually do think that if you spun a golf ball in the same way you spun a billiard ball (by hitting it barely on the toe and spinning it like a top by not hitting the ball square) rust would help.  But that isn't how golf spin works / is generated.  Similarly, you could add grooves to the end of a pool cue and strike the shot in the middle, but that isn't the spin billiard players want.  If the pool cue had grooves and you "spun" by hitting it square and allowing the grooves to grab, chalk would be irrelevant.


Your post makes no logical sense. You argue that chalk only aids snooker ball spin by helping the cue tip grip the ball on non square hits. You then imply that this is irrelevant to golf as we are striking the ball square, which is just wrong.

I have no idea either way but it seems logical to me, that what ever friction gained from rust, will not make up for the loss of groove shape and density due to the rusting process.

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