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RDean

Buying a new Driver (used)

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Hi guys; I'm new to this forum. I am looking for a new driver and want to get your opinions. I had labrum and AC Joint surgery 5 1/2 months ago; had a torn labrum and had a lot of arthritis cut out of my AC Joint (acromium). I have played 8 rounds since the first week of November and have decided that I want to buy a new driver. I currently have a 10.5 Ben Hogan CS3 driver, stiff shaft. I had a tendency to hook but have since straightened that out by opening the clubface a little at address and transferring my weight more timely. My buddy says I hit the ball too high and I recently was fitted for a 9.5, regular shaft driver since my swing speed is down to 79. I am going to wait a while so that I can heal more and strengthen my shoulder more before I get a final fitting.

I want a driver that will increase swing speed but also provide accuracy. I am looking at a used Taylor Made R9 in a regular shaft but am also looking at a Cleveland Launcher DST. I am also open to a Taylor Made Burner driver. I know the DST and Burner are lighter weight and am afraid they can result in a loss of accuracy, in addition to more distance. My opinion is that the R9 would be the best option but I want your thoughts. Also, should a guy with a swing speed of 79 actually use a 9.5 loft driver?

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How about a Cobra S2? You can cheat your way out of a hook, and it's quite forgiving. My father-in-law used it the other day, and he said it was quite comfortable, and he's as broken as you are.

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I had the R9 Supertri , i really liked it . I just traded it in for the R11 and gained about 5-10 yrds , i picked the R11 up for $221.00 from Dicks with trad in. My swing speed is around 105-109 with the R11 , The only thing i seen from the R9 to the R11 is i can now hit a nice draw. with the way i have it set up .

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The truth?

Your flight may be too high due to a swing issue. Someone with 79 SS doesn't get a 9.5 really high unless swing issues are involved.

To your question - my SS is about 86 and I use a 12.5 degree driver head and a soft regular flex. Unless your tempo is cat-like quick, you should opt more for a senior or soft regular flex and go to 12.5-13 degrees.

I will say look at Adams Drivers - you can find an ultra-light series that is new yet the model is a year old, get a senior flex and cut the length to 45-45.5 inches - that should make it more controllable and turn it into a soft regular.

Looking around, try researching the Adams 4G ultra-lite in 12-12.5 degrees. The swing weight is high, so you can cut down .5 inches, still have a decent swing weight and the senior flex will stiffen to more of a soft regular.

I am using the Adams 9088 UL in 12.5 degrees (the latest ultra lite edition) and am very happy with it (although I am using an aftermarket shaft).

You can also go to Callaway PreOwned and find a Razr Hawk in 13 degrees - get it in senior flex.

good luck.

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Originally Posted by Mr. Desmond

The truth?

Your flight may be too high due to a swing issue. Someone with 79 SS doesn't get a 9.5 really high unless swing issues are involved.

...


Mr. Desmond is very likely correct. "Too high" is a judgement thing. If your SS is 79 MPH then you should hit the ball higher than many of your buddies. However, it is odd that you can do it with a 9.5* driver. Somehow you are adding loft to that driver. Maybe it is a weird set up and swing path thing that simply adds loft like one might do on a bunker shot. Maybe it is an early release. Maybe you are OK with it and maybe you are not.

So, the question becomes what kind of fitting are you doing? One that takes your current swing, issues and all, and finds a club that works for you? Or one that takes the swing you hope to have and finds the club that works for you and that swing?

I'm always working on my swing swing so I choose the later. My father is not working on his swing and is happy to get clubs that fit his swing in its current, very flawed state. There is no right answer. There is only your answer.

The only wrong answer is to not get fitted and then have clubs that force you to make compensations you did not plan to make.

Good luck with your recover.

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Thank you. I believe that I come down too steep on my downswing and will try to make that flatter. Part of my problem is that I don't always take the club back low to the ground and I get too quick on my takeaway, which causes me to come down too steep and/or flip my hands causing a hook. I am also going to play the ball a little farther back in my stance and tee the ball lower. I also believe that I tee the ball too high sometimes.

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Originally Posted by RDean

Part of my problem is that I don't always take the club back low to the ground

and I get too quick on my takeaway, which causes me to come down too steep and/or flip my hands causing a hook.



1.  why would you want to take the club back low to the ground?  it moves back on a circle, on an inclined plane.  as soon as it moves back it should be moving up from the ground.

2.  how does being "too quick" on the takeaway cause you to come down too steep or flip your hands?

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I have seen a video about a driver that adds distance AND the shaft adjusts to everyones individual swing speed ... what was the name of that ?

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It sounds like you could be teeing the ball up too high.  Have you experimented with different tee heights to see the effect it has on your ball flight?

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In your situation, I'd go to a golf course that sells clubs and one that has an outdoor range where I could tee up on grass and hit several different drivers.  You can then test different lofts and shaft stiffness to find out what suits your expectations the best.  The actual manufacturer likely wont matter all that much.  Likely while out on the range the golf professional will be there to help you evaluate your results.

I went from TM to G-15 and am happy with my decison.  The G-15 seems to be a bit more forgiving and my drives tend to be straighter.  With a swing speed at 79, and potentially not going to increase all that much, hitting it straight becomes even more important.  Last price I saw for the G-15's new was about $250, so even a new one isnt all that expensive.

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Originally Posted by snofrog

I have seen a video about a driver that adds distance AND the shaft adjusts to everyones individual swing speed ... what was the name of that ?



Nunchuk?

No - not for the OP - it's a heavy shaft. And if you believe one shaft fits all ...

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Yes, that's a very distinct possibility. I plan on playing tomorrow, so I am going to tee the ball lower and hit some drives at the range. I'll see what that does. I also come down too steep sometimes, so I will work on impacting the ball on a flatter plane.

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Regarding the quick takeaway, according to many pros, that causes everything to be out of sync and thus your weight may not transfer properly and/or timely to your left side. I have had that problem throughout my life; sometimes I transfer properly and sometimes I do not. In fact an article I read recently said that a slow takeaway enables you to synchronize your swing - upper and lower body parts, that is - thus enabling you to transfer your weight better. I have tried that in my last few rounds and that has worked. Some people can synchronize a quick takeaway but I cannot.

I don't think the takeaway causes me to come down too steep but I tend to pick the club up a little too steep when I begin my takeaway, then I come down too steep. Many pros recommend bringing the club back (for drives) low and slow. I know that works great when I am consistently doing that. However, my bad habits reappear and I take the club back too fast and then I get out of sync - my weight hangs back on my right side - and I have to flip the right forearm over (subconsciously) to catch up. I agree that you have to raise the club from the ground upon beginning your takeaway; however, I raise it too much and follow that up by coming down too steep on my downswing.

I'm just trying to renew my game. I used to be a consistent 13 handicap golfer but in recent years I have regressed; part of that I believe is due to my shoulder. I could sense it becoming weak over the past two years. Now, accepting the fact I am advancing in age (49) and coming off labrum/AC Joint repair (5 1/2 months post-op), I will be switching from a 10.5 stiff shafted driver to either a 9.5 or 10.5 regular shafted driver. I know most advise that anyone with a slow swingspeed should not even think of using a stiff-shafted driver but a few Golf Galaxy employees and a friend who knows my game, advised that I should go with a 9.5. I'm very undecided. I am going to wait a few more month until I am about 7 1/2 months before buying a driver.

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Originally Posted by RDean

Regarding the quick takeaway, according to many pros, that causes everything to be out of sync and thus your weight may not transfer properly and/or timely to your left side. I have had that problem throughout my life; sometimes I transfer properly and sometimes I do not. In fact an article I read recently said that a slow takeaway enables you to synchronize your swing - upper and lower body parts, that is - thus enabling you to transfer your weight better. I have tried that in my last few rounds and that has worked. Some people can synchronize a quick takeaway but I cannot.

I don't think the takeaway causes me to come down too steep but I tend to pick the club up a little too steep when I begin my takeaway, then I come down too steep. Many pros recommend bringing the club back (for drives) low and slow. I know that works great when I am consistently doing that. However, my bad habits reappear and I take the club back too fast and then I get out of sync - my weight hangs back on my right side - and I have to flip the right forearm over (subconsciously) to catch up. I agree that you have to raise the club from the ground upon beginning your takeaway; however, I raise it too much and follow that up by coming down too steep on my downswing.

I'm just trying to renew my game. I used to be a consistent 13 handicap golfer but in recent years I have regressed; part of that I believe is due to my shoulder. I could sense it becoming weak over the past two years. Now, accepting the fact I am advancing in age (49) and coming off labrum/AC Joint repair (5 1/2 months post-op), I will be switching from a 10.5 stiff shafted driver to either a 9.5 or 10.5 regular shafted driver. I know most advise that anyone with a slow swingspeed should not even think of using a stiff-shafted driver but a few Golf Galaxy employees and a friend who knows my game, advised that I should go with a 9.5. I'm very undecided. I am going to wait a few more month until I am about 7 1/2 months before buying a driver.

You're taking me back a few years when I had a different swing technique -- in response to the above:


Low and slow usually means "don't pick it up," as in keep your left arm straight for a righty (that usually helps). Some guys try to do something unnatural with "low and slow." Don't.

Think "slow motion" when you take the driver back - that will usually slow things down to normal speed.

Think wide going up, and then down (helps get rid of the steeps)

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Originally Posted by Mr. Desmond

You're taking me back a few years when I had a different swing technique -- in response to the above:

Low and slow usually means "don't pick it up," as in keep your left arm straight for a righty (that usually helps). Some guys try to do something unnatural with "low and slow." Don't.

Think "slow motion" when you take the driver back - that will usually slow things down to normal speed.

Think wide going up, and then down (helps get rid of the steeps)


Thanks....yeah, I'm back from the grass range and I practiced teeing the ball lower - had to use some trial and error regarding the best tee height - but I am teeing the ball moderately lower, which did pay off. I'd call the end result a medium ball flight and I did seem to hit it well too. As a secondary goal today, I tried to ensure that I transferred my weight properly. From the balls I could see (have cataracts), my accuracy and ball flight appear to be what I sought. Tomorrow I am playing, so I will learn more then.

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Originally Posted by newtogolf

It sounds like you could be teeing the ball up too high.  Have you experimented with different tee heights to see the effect it has on your ball flight?



I got back from the driving range about an hour and half ago and that is precisely what I tried to find...my optimum tee height. I started teeing it too low but found the right height. You were dead-on; it was simply a matter of teeing the ball too high. I have been doing that for the past year or two, so it frustrates me that I hadn't experimented earlier. I guess it's just that teeing it lower feels so foreign to me but if it keeps working and I hit the ball on the flight I did today, I'll be very happy. Seems to me that the ball flight issue has been solved. Now, I just need to keep ensuring that my weight transfer is timely and my game should be close to where I want it to be before the snow flies. I am really looking forward to the 2012 golf season. By March, my shoulder should be nearly healed and much stronger.

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