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Good Golf Posture (How to Address the Golf Ball)


mvmac

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8 hours ago, Tepi90 said:

Absolutely golden video, thank you!

I personally have my butt out at the address, coming from over ten years of ice skating in my youth. Would you say having your butt out can lead to early extension aswell, because your butt has to move off the wall to give freedom for your upper body to rotate?

Probably, but that is hard to confirm without a down the line picture of you at address.

What is really at issue here is whether or not you can hinge your hips properly with a neutral spine (i.e. without anterior pelvic tilt; the S shape OR posterior pelvic tilt; the C shape). If you have either posterior pelvic tilt or anterior pelvic tilt while standing upright, then you would want to address that issue first; lots of good information on youtube and other resources on the net. Use your favorite search tool. 

Here is an excellent video on learning the proper hip hinge.

 

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11 hours ago, Tepi90 said:

I personally have my butt out at the address, coming from over ten years of ice skating in my youth. Would you say having your butt out can lead to early extension aswell, because your butt has to move off the wall to give freedom for your upper body to rotate?

It can, but as with almost everything, it won't necessarily lead to that. I don't even know that I could say it would the majority of the time.

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On 3/16/2020 at 9:42 PM, Tepi90 said:

Absolutely golden video, thank you!

I personally have my butt out at the address, coming from over ten years of ice skating in my youth. Would you say having your butt out can lead to early extension aswell, because your butt has to move off the wall to give freedom for your upper body to rotate?

It can, especially if the weight gets into your heels at address.

Having said that you can also early extend from a good address position.

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  • 10 months later...

I just discovered the OP while searching the web on terms like "golf setup back straight curved."  Interestingly: The majority of hits led to articles promoting straight back, head up.  This is what our golf class instructor taught us last summer--as well as butt out.  (I just started golfing last June.)

To make a summer-long story short: While I had successes, I never was able to develop a good, consistent swing.

I'm up here in cold country.  Not wishing to start at Ground Zero come spring, I decided to take off-season lessons from a place called True MotionThe very first thing they're having me do, after I sent them front and down-line videos of my current swing, was a full week of drills doing nothing but fixing my setup stance--to include rounding my shoulders.

I don't know how good my golf swing will be, after all is said and done, but I can say this: I've been suffering from upper-back, shoulder, and neck discomfort for a while, now.  (This started before I took up golf.)  Doing various exercises to increase the flexibility in my upper back so as to allow me to round it in my golf stance has made all that disappear completely.

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  • 9 months later...

So I got a lesson recently and this was the core message and flaw of my old swing. I had too much pelvic tilt previously. After adjusting to this new stance, the results have been tremendous, however I've consistently been feeling discomfort in my middle back. It's nothing that impacts me during my play, but I was curious if there's any obvious reason why this would occur. For context, I'm focusing on keeping my hips in an extremely neutral position at address, and sometimes my thought is to tighen the core so that my back begins to arch in the middle of my spine, continuing to arch up through my shoulders.

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3 hours ago, Joe1 said:

So I got a lesson recently and this was the core message and flaw of my old swing. I had too much pelvic tilt previously. After adjusting to this new stance, the results have been tremendous, however I've consistently been feeling discomfort in my middle back. It's nothing that impacts me during my play, but I was curious if there's any obvious reason why this would occur. For context, I'm focusing on keeping my hips in an extremely neutral position at address, and sometimes my thought is to tighen the core so that my back begins to arch in the middle of my spine, continuing to arch up through my shoulders.

Do you do any back stretches? Without seeing your swing it will be hard to tell if what you are feeling is actually happening. Too much arch is not good as is too much tucking of the hips. I mentioned stretches because doing exercises like pelvic tilts (cat/cows) can help warm up the lower back before practice and playing.

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