Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

What do you suggest.

4 posts in this topic

2 weeks ago I had an total knee replacement so for the next 10 or so weeks I won't be on the golf course, practice range, or making any full swings.  Maybe in 6-8 weeks I will be able to putt and chip (short range practice), depending the Doctor says.  So if you were in my position what would you do for the ensuing weeks to make yourself a better golfer?  I certainly will make time to watch the videos I've collected and read the books/articles but am looking for some suggestions other that the obvious stuff.

So if you have some thoughts let me know and if not thanks for reading this and giving it a few minutes of your time.


Share this post

Link to post
Share on other sites

Want to get rid of this advertisement? Sign up (or log in) today! It's free!

I'd go with stretching more, especially with having surgery.  Simple stretches will keep you loose enough.  Also, don't push too hard to do golf-related things when you can't.  Give yourself the time off to recuperate, and regenerate a love of the game.


Share this post

Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

i had my knee replaced last summer and after 2 weeks was going to the gym riding the recumbent bike. my doc never closed the door on golf so i was hitting some short balls after 3 weeks. strengthen the legs, stretch the hamstrings, all kinds of walking are good. i'm a long time yoga guy so was in better leg shape than many. fatigue will be a big problem for many more weeks and only leg strength can help. climb the stadium steps, and graduate to 2 at a time. but no jogging. and btw, take as few meds as possible. the pain killers, usually opiods, have many nasty side effects and NSAIDS slowly wreck the kidneys and blood vessels. remember VIOXX? be kind to yourself but don't get lazy. now i'm 6 months on and still lacking some flexibility and sometimes get shin pains. now in the humid weather both hip joints giving me pain due to gait imbalance.


Share this post

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Want to join this community?

    We'd love to have you!

    Sign Up
  • 2016 TST Partners

    GAME Golf
    PING Golf
    Lowest Score Wins
  • Posts

    • I think that's part of what bothered me so much is that it's not the most difficult course and I've been playing pretty well (for my skill level) recently.  With the wind and the greens having the holes cut where they were, it was getting out of control.  I only had 27 putts, but that's because I was chipping or putting from off the green on the majority of the holes. I wish I was good enough to do that.  The pin on the 109 yard hole was an inviting pin.  The trouble was to the left side of the green.  I actually hit what I thought was a really good shot, but the wind actually knocked the ball down from behind.  I hit a 115 yard club on that hole, so I was playing for behind the hole.  Still... the one guy that did hit the green was about 20 feet behind the hole and his putt looked like it was going to be perfect.  It was about 3 feet beyond the hole and then it caught the slope and took off down the hill and off the green into the valley where the other 3 of us started from.

      We asked afterwards if that was maybe the case but the guy we spoke to said he didn't know anything about it.  We assumed maybe the guy who cut the holes caught his wife with another man or something the night before. It was a busy Saturday.  We still finished in 4 hours, but when we ran into other groups, they all commented on the holes too. 

      Luckily, only 1 hole was noticeably cut on a slope.  That was the 16th hole and the combination of where the pin was located and that the hole was cut on a slope meant that a par was an amazing score there.  Only 1 of us managed to make par on that hole.  I believe I made double (topped my drive, lay up to about 85 yards short, wedge was just right of the hole and rolled down the hill, chipped up but the ball had no check so it rolled off the back side into the rough by a bunker, flopped the ball with a full swing from 25 feet to within 2 feet and tapped in).  

      Meh... I guess it's just sour grapes.  I definitely didn't play well but... I was hoping to blame it on whoever set up the course that day.  

    • I know this post is several months old, but I just finished watching Jim Hardy's video s
    • At our club championship this year, our pro deliberately placed the pin in positions I had never seen on the course before (either just behind or in front of bunkers, on the most steeply sloping part of the green, etc.). Fair enough - you have to deal with whatever pin positions are chosen, but more than half the participants complained that there was no way they could play anything approaching their normal game, and the scores were pretty bad. I would say that 75% of the pin positions were more difficult than normal - a few tough ones would be ok, but - as Groucho Valentine said above - it spoiled the day for a lot of the people hoping to at least put in a decent round at the most important competition of the year.
    • That's my concern. How would a 20+ handicap know where to set it? 
    • My phone and computer autocorrect c to k. His is with a c. Yes pretty easy. If you know where you're trying to get it of course. There's nothing that magically puts it in the right spot.
  • TST Blog Entries

  • Images

  • Today's Birthdays

    1. Covert
      (73 years old)
    2. Robert Diddings
      Robert Diddings
      (32 years old)
  • Blog Entries