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h3king

Getting a new driver?

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I used my buddies callaway ft5 9.5 stiff draw bias driver, and I drove the ball 300 yards right down the middle on the 6 holes I used it. I have a natural slice and i was thinking of getting the same driver. But I was wondering I rather just fix my swing then get a draw bias driver what do you guys think about getting it? I really like the feel of the club but its also like 400 plus.

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Fixing your swing and changing your club will both benefit you. Fixing your swing will take a lot more time investment and your won't see results as quickly. Changing your club will cost money, but you may see relatively immediate results.

The question you need to ask is this: do you want to keep your current swing and see some quick results, or work your way through fixing your swing, which will allow you to "play" more shots and play golf at a higher level. If you buy a draw biased club and keep your swing, you will always need that help from technology. If you fix your swing, you can shape more shots later in your golf career, which will add dimensions to your game.

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I could knock it 300 yards on occassion with the handicap I started the year off at (around a 36). Believe me, you can be really bad and hit the ball a long way. Drives are only maybe 13 strokes a round. Whether the hole ends badly after that is irrelevant.

As far as the OP goes, I think you're far better off fixing your swing. 400 bucks is a lot of lessons, and if you're really looking to get better, you're going to be FAR better off with a few lessons. A driver will fix drives - sometimes. Lessons will fix every club in your bag.

I've knocked 10 strokes off my handicap this year thanks in part to a lesson or two.

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If your a 36 handicapper your best bet is to work and pay for your swing. Getting off the Tee with a new driver is not going to turn your game around. Sounds like you also need to work on irons and putting.
While getting off the Tee is critical, your mid-irons and short game are more important if you ask me.

Getting rid of a slice is one of the easiest things to do. Have a Pro look at your swing for about 5 minutes and he will give you numerous things to work on. Most of the time its being too far away from the ball or an outside-inside swing which can be worked on at the range.

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I used my buddies callaway ft5 9.5 stiff draw bias driver, and I drove the ball 300 yards right down the middle on the 6 holes I used it. .

Nope. No you didnt. Not with that handicap

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Nope. No you didnt. Not with that handicap

BS. I play with a guy weekly who can boom it 300+ yds. He can't do shit after that, but he can boom his drives straight and long, so it's possible.

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I played with a guy a couple weeks ago who shot like 70 on 9 holes, but he could hit the ball like 320. He even had a birdie somehow because he managed to hit a good iron shot out of the blue. And got on a 520 yard par 5 in two (his second shot was a 7 iron from about 190). Great drive, fat iron shot, skulled iron shot over the green, pitching wedge skulled over the green the other way, bad chip shot and a 3 or 4 putt on every hole will keep you up in the 30s really easy.

The easier drivers get to hit, the more you're going to run into people who, for whatever reason, can hit the ball a mile with the driver, but are really bad at golf in general. This whole elitist "you have a high cap so you obviously can't drive the ball a long way" stuff is just BS. I was popping it out there 275-290 when I started the year off (when it went straight), and I was a 37 or 38 cap.

This isn't to say that the OP is really putting it out there that far, just saying that it's certainly possible he can.

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I don't have a 36 handicap, I just never figured out what mine is. I can drive the ball far. I been playing for 3-4 years now and I planing on getting new clubs and getting my handicap started next season. I shot a 85 last round, and usally get around 90.

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I, for one, say fix your swing.

My best friend from college (who is as close to scratch as anyone I know) said a funny thing to me.

The people who sell clubs, want to sell you clubs. There is no money in it for them in you becoming a better golfer.

In fact, I've seen many salespeople talk like used car salesman to close a deal and sell you that new, top of the line draw biased club.

I feel the best way to fix a bad slice is to spend the time and $$ for lessons from a pro, and the range and on the course fixing the shot. It seems to me the time spent fixing your drive will also translate to other aspects of the game as well, and overall more benefit (over time) would be gained by working on fixing the swing rather then buying a club to fix it.

I'd also get a much better sense of satisfaction that I was growing as a golfer as I fixed my swing, and that's what we all play for right? To get better at something we love.

Of course, this doesn't mean that a new club is a bad thing, but I wouldn't rely on magic clubs anymore then I would on magic beans.

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