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talarfon

Right hand grip

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I have changed to use the overlap grip this year and have been following instructions on how to grip properly.

From what I've read/seen it suggests that the thumb of the right hand (I play right handed btw) should be pointing towards the left foot.

However as I swung the club I would often tighten my right hand grip and the pressure and direction of the thumb would close the club face and cause snap hooks. I could feel the club closing on my downswing and eventually decided to move my thumb to pointing straight down the club face, I have swung better since BUT it doesn't feel quite as natural.

Any suggestions??

I thought that maybe my right hand was rotated too far down the club (i.e holding the bottom of the club), moving my thumb naturally forces it into a better position??

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I suspect your right hand grip tightening is taking over the entire proceedings.

Take your grip, as described in your post, then simple take your right thumb off the club - its easy to do and you can still make a normal swing.

See if this helps.

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Originally Posted by burner

I suspect your right hand grip tightening is taking over the entire proceedings.

Take your grip, as described in your post, then simple take your right thumb off the club - its easy to do and you can still make a normal swing.

See if this helps.

yap, Hogan covers that pretty well and in detail in his book. Modern day, see Fred Couples do pretty much the same thing. I relax my right thumb and pincer finger on the way up and then sort of "reapply gentle pressure" (don't want to say "grab", but yes, kind of)  at the top without any excessive tightening in thumb and forefinger. It gives me a lot of "feel" in the shot. I have a callous on the outer edge of my right fore finger not from a tight grip, but from the grip rubbing against it.

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Usually you want to maintain constant grip pressure through out the swing. Most pro's probably grip stronger than us because there hands are stronger. its like lifting weights. 20 lbs might be light for me who's lifted weights for a while, but for a beginner its heavy. Same with the hands, pro's hit countless amount of shots. There hands are strong.

There is always some form of regripping in the swing (added tension). The force of the club changes in the swing, so the hands have to adjust to maintain feel. So if you have a very light grip, and you reach the top, you might regrip hard and throw off the swing. If you grip tighter at address, you wont regrip as hard at the top and gain better consistancy. Golf is always better when the adjustments made in the swing is minimized.

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Quote:

I suspect your right hand grip tightening is taking over the entire proceedings.

Take your grip, as described in your post, then simple take your right thumb off the club - its easy to do and you can still make a normal swing.

See if this helps.

I tried this in the range today but really struggled with it, pushed most of them and it didn't feel comfortable at all. Especially at the top of my swing!!

Quote:
If you grip tighter at address, you wont regrip as hard at the top and gain better consistancy. Golf is always better when the adjustments made in the swing is minimized.

I do grip pretty lightly at address to be honest so will give a tighter grip a try, would you ever change grip pressure depending on the club your using? (i.e. full wedge through to driver)

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Not really, my grip pressure is pretty much the same for every club. I mean your talking about maybe,

Driver total weight = 300-350 grams

Wedge total weight = 400-450 grams

So, difference between 13 clubs is 100-150 grams of weight, thats about 1/4 a lb. Its not that much. I really can't tell, i just grip the club. Don't death grip it, but the old adage of holding a tube of toothpaste, or a bird, what ever, is just an absurd notion.

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