• Announcements

    • iacas

      GAME GOLF Ryder Cup Contest   09/22/2016

      Join our GAME GOLF Ryder Cup Challenge to win an autographed GAME GOLF, a Pebble Steel watch, and many more great prizes!
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
krupa

New golfer at the range...

11 posts in this topic

Usually when I go to the range, I get a large bucket (forget how many balls are in it) and work my way through the clubs.  As a new golfer would it be more productive to maybe get a smaller bucket and just focus on one club per session?

thanks

-matthew

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Want to get rid of this advertisement? Sign up (or log in) today! It's free!

Originally Posted by krupa

Usually when I go to the range, I get a large bucket (forget how many balls are in it) and work my way through the clubs.  As a new golfer would it be more productive to maybe get a smaller bucket and just focus on one club per session?

thanks

-matthew

The most productive thing you can do is take a few lessons and work on the specific things the instructor identifies for you. If lessons are beyond your means at the present, I recommend you check out the 5 Simple Keys videos here , and working your way through them.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Originally Posted by geauxforbroke

The most productive thing you can do is take a few lessons and work on the specific things the instructor identifies for you. If lessons are beyond your means at the present, I recommend you check out the 5 Simple Keys videos here, and working your way through them.


I do (and have) taken lessons but my instructor and I have trouble finding times to work together so it's 3-4 weeks between each one.  I have only so much patience to work on putting and chipping (we've been slowly building my swing up) so I will go to the range once or twice a week anyway.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

if i'm really practicing i normally only use a 5/6 iron. Go to the drills i want.

i do warm up with wedges and 8 iron first

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Originally Posted by krupa

Quote:

Originally Posted by geauxforbroke

The most productive thing you can do is take a few lessons and work on the specific things the instructor identifies for you. If lessons are beyond your means at the present, I recommend you check out the 5 Simple Keys videos here, and working your way through them.

I do (and have) taken lessons but my instructor and I have trouble finding times to work together so it's 3-4 weeks between each one.  I have only so much patience to work on putting and chipping (we've been slowly building my swing up) so I will go to the range once or twice a week anyway.

Has the instructor identified specific things you need to work on? If so, I would find drills to help with those things and strictly work on those between lessons. Sometimes it takes 3-4 to really get a new concept down.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Good form for putting really helps beginners for what can be 40% of your on-course shots.

Chipping not only helps you get the ball close for a one-putt, but also builds your overall swing motion. Short chip shots help you develop the feel of hitting the ball squarely on the clubface.

Facilities at the practice range also shape what you can do during practice. Does the range have a practice green where you can practice your chips and putts? If so, here's some "second level" drills you can do.

  • Putting clock. Work your way around nine holes of just putting. Vary the short putts and longer putts. Can you average two putts or less on each "hole"?
  • Up and down. Plan out nine different short shots you can practice to various holes. How many times can you get up and down ? (chip up for a one-putt). If your chips are always followed by two putts (or a three-putt), you're not getting the ball close with your chips.

General rule for golfers: Most people don't benefit much from marathon practice sessions. Less time spent well focused is better than beating balls aimlessly for two hours.  In the early going, the idea is to pick up a club frequently and do some golfing with it.

If you can stop off after work and practice putting for just 15 minutes, this is progress.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Originally Posted by geauxforbroke

Has the instructor identified specific things you need to work on? If so, I would find drills to help with those things and strictly work on those between lessons. Sometimes it takes 3-4 to really get a new concept down.


Sorry, I guess I could be clearer... I got into golf when I went to visit my father in FL.  When we were talking about things we could do during my visit, he suggested we play a round of golf.  So before I went down, I took some introductory lessons to just get familiar with playing.  After playing, I found I really enjoyed it so decided to get some clubs and really pursue it deeply.

So far, my "in depth" lessons have only covered putting and chipping and I practice that but I don't have the patience to only practice that.  I also don't always have the time to play... so I go to the range once or twice a week.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

In order for range work, practice, to help, one must know what they are trying to do -- where they are going. To discover a swing on your own takes a lot of trial and error and more than a little luck. Most of us never discover a repeatable swing on our own. So, I'm in the "get at least one full swing lesson" group.

To your original question, most of us are better off hitting less balls and working on positions. Take time between each swing -- don't just rack balls over and hit again and again. Set a club on the ground for alinement. Notice that almost all pros do this every time on the range so, what makes me think I don't need this. While working on your basic swing, less club switching is good. You are working on the swing and less variables are better than more. Work on one thing at a time and try not to care about ball flight. For example, when working on path, you may hit bad shots but get the path right. That is called progress. When at golf school, we used 6-irons for almost all general swing work. We used other clubs too, but the 6-iron was used while working on general swing issues.

On other range sessions, you may want to create a game and just hit balls at targets with different clubs. This, for me, is not the same as working on my swing.

Have fun.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for all the input.  I will try to refocus and practice what I'm learning instead of just going out and hitting balls.

-matt

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Originally Posted by krupa

Quote:

Originally Posted by geauxforbroke

Has the instructor identified specific things you need to work on? If so, I would find drills to help with those things and strictly work on those between lessons. Sometimes it takes 3-4 to really get a new concept down.

Sorry, I guess I could be clearer... I got into golf when I went to visit my father in FL.  When we were talking about things we could do during my visit, he suggested we play a round of golf.  So before I went down, I took some introductory lessons to just get familiar with playing.  After playing, I found I really enjoyed it so decided to get some clubs and really pursue it deeply.

So far, my "in depth" lessons have only covered putting and chipping and I practice that but I don't have the patience to only practice that.  I also don't always have the time to play... so I go to the range once or twice a week.

Ahh, I see. In that case, I would suggest watching the 5 Simple Keys videos (the link is in my first post) and start working through some of the drills they present.

Good luck.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Lots of good suggestions.  One thing I've found helpful when doing range work is to simulate playing on a course....and maybe integrating a drill into the routine as well.  Instead of hitting a bunch of balls with the same club...mix it up.  Hit a driver, followed by a mid-iron to a specific flag/marker on the range, and then a wedge to a closer marker.  In my case, I would incorporate a "punch drill" into my swing to focus on hands forward at impact and extension on follow-through.  Your instructor may recommend a specific drill for you.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0