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British Open vs. The Open Championship?


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  1. 1. What do you call it?

    • The British Open
      21
    • The Open Championship
      20
    • Either/I Don't Care
      17


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This thread reeks of political correctness. I could not be any more apathetic towards a topic as this one. I read through all the responses and was quite puzzled at the number of people that get worked up over this topic.
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This thread reeks of political correctness. I could not be any more apathetic towards a topic as this one. I read through all the responses and was quite puzzled at the number of people that get worked up over this topic.

You read through all the posts and posted yourself, but you couldn't be more apathetic? I think you could be. :-)

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Quote:

Originally Posted by RGoosen

This thread reeks of political correctness.

I could not be any more apathetic towards a topic as this one. I read through all the responses and was quite puzzled at the number of people that get worked up over this topic.

You read through all the posts and posted yourself, but you couldn't be more apathetic? I think you could be.

:-) Start of the Phil Comedy Tour! He'll be here all week!

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Well, they're wrong because there is NO such tournament as the "British Open." Not referring to any event by the name it is actually called is, I think, very rude. Every time I hear it I cringe. The naysayers will say it distinguishes it from the US Open. No it doesn't. "US" is all the difference one needs. It's called simply "The Open Championship." I've never understood why it's so difficult for some to call it that.

What if someone just wanted to willy-nilly start calling The Super Bowl something else? Or the World Series something else? Especially considering that the "world" isn't even invited to participate in the "World Series." Sorry, if I'm ranting but this one has always pissed me off.


First of all when this was started, no one played baseball anywhere else but it is just a name that stuck. I have never heard any one complaint about what it is called in some other country.

And not only would you be wrong but you be a candidate for what other people around the world call an "ugly American." The feeling that we some right to call someone else's golf tournament by whatever name we wish.

Why don't some start calling the US Open "The American Open" or the USA Open or The USGA Open?

How about something this simple. It's called The Open Championship. Why would you call something anything other than the name it is called?

That's like saying my name is "John" and you start calling them Jack when they don't wish to be called that.

What could be more simple than that?

I think you'd certainly be called incorrect if you choose to refer to any event or person by anything other than the name it wishes to be called by. If someone insisted on being called "African American" would you call them "black?"

I mean this whole topic is just too ridiculous for words.

Second of all, this is not a race or human being we are talking about. It's a contest about a game that has no feelings except ego driven ones by pompous and pretentious golfers. I get that they are trying to preserve the "specialness" of their get together but it is still a game. We talk about it regardless of the name. Being involved in "The Open" or "The Masters" doesn't give you the right to be an a-hole about the fans that do you the favor of watching your clique of friends participating in entertainment.

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Actually, since you mention it ... I have a problem with our major team sports (football, basketball, baseball) calling their championships "World" championships.  There are no NFL teams outside of the US, and there are no NBA or MLB teams outside of North America.  None of them are "World champions."

The best players in the world play in the nfl, nba and mlb. That's why they are world championships.

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As said earlier I totally understand why those in the states call The Open Championship "The British" to differentiate it from other majors thousands of miles away. Interestingly enough we in the UK call the PGA championship in the States the USPGA whilst calling our own equivalent at Wentworth the "PGA". However, I think in spite of all the colloquialisms we know what each other means on both sides of the pond....

Some might not know though that when the winner of the competition is announced is he is neither the Open Champion nor British Open Champion but the "Champion Golfer" -to reflect the inaugural tournament  "open" to golfs professionals at the time -which took place following the sad death of Allan Robertson in 1860 -the first undisputed professional champion of golf who was unbeatable at the time and sadly died at the young age of 44.

He is buried in the grounds of St Andrews Cathedral and was highly revered by the likes of Old and young Tom Morris who themselves are interred not far from their champion. Definitely worth visiting his graveside if ever in St Andrews. From what I have read he was the most highly respected sportsman of his era and deserves a place alongside the annuls of the greats in golfing history. Quite simply Without Allan Robertson there may have been no major golf tournaments. As a result, he has certainly played his part in contributing towards making Golf the major sport and gentlemans game it is today.

P.S. On my visit to the Golf Museum I was lucky enough to see the "original" claret jug and it was interesting to note the trophy contains the words "champion Golfer of the World" -a fitting epitath I think to Allan Roberston and all those who have followed him over the past 145 years.

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I lump people who call it "The Open" in with the likes of those who call it "The Ohio State University"....

Yeah when I was growing up watching the tourny it was always called The British Open on ABC.Now all of a sudden few years ago for some reason it was called The Open Championship.Im for keeping things way they were but im old fashioned.

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I think with increasing multimedia, the internet and global marketing, the championship will increasingly be called "The Open" throughout the golfing world and international media. However, I know it doesn't bother most of us brits that's its called the "British" by other nationals. If anything its a great advert for our tournament and country to be acknowledged in this way by people thousands of miles away from us. to me though  it will always be The Open because it was the first truly "open" tournament  following the passing of Allan Robertson in 1860 and as a tournament it is steeped in so much history whilst professionals and amateurs alike for almost a century and a half from all over the world have been open to qualify for and possibly win it. For this reason alone I think it is so special.

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I think with increasing multimedia, the internet and global marketing, the championship will increasingly be called "The Open" throughout the golfing world and international media. However, I know it doesn't bother most of us brits that's its called the "British" by other nationals. If anything its a great advert for our tournament and country to be acknowledged in this way by people thousands of miles away from us. to me though  it will always be The Open because it was the first truly "open" tournament  following the passing of Allan Robertson in 1860 and as a tournament it is steeped in so much history whilst professionals and amateurs alike for almost a century and a half from all over the world have been open to qualify for and possibly win it. For this reason alone I think it is so special.


I would add that British Open is more of a short version of the full name, The Open Championship , with less syllables. You can say it quicker. We all know it is the oldest of the majors and when it was conceived it with truly a World Championship.

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I would add that British Open is more of a short version of the full name, The Open Championship, with less syllables. You can say it quicker. We all know it is the oldest of the majors and when it was conceived it with truly a World Championship.

but if we called it "The Open" it is even shorter or maybe "B.O."....

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P.S. On my visit to the Golf Museum I was lucky enough to see the "original" claret jug and it was interesting to note the trophy contains the words "champion Golfer of the World" -a fitting epitath I think to Allan Roberston and all those who have followed him over the past 145 years.

Maybe Robertson, but for a lot of the history of the event it would be an absurdity to consider the winner the champion golfer of the world .  This is the kind of pretentiousness which may have been justified at the outset when there was one tournament, but no longer makes a lick of sense and clearly was ridiculous for many decades.  Keep the titles, by all means, but let's not make believe they mean the same thing now they did in 1860.

There is no more reason that the British Open winner is the Champion of the World than there is reason to consider the winner of any other event the Champion Golfer of the World.  And this really, is the root of the problem.  Circumstances changed but there are some on the far side of the pond who cling to the days when being at the top of the British Empire in almost anything was to be top of the world.  That isn't the case any more, socially, politically, culturally, or golf-wise.  So now they are reduced to worrying about what we call things.  Thankfully, most brits have a little more common sense.

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Quote:

Originally Posted by pitchandputter

P.S. On my visit to the Golf Museum I was lucky enough to see the "original" claret jug and it was interesting to note the trophy contains the words "champion Golfer of the World" -a fitting epitath I think to Allan Roberston and all those who have followed him over the past 145 years.

Maybe Robertson, but for a lot of the history of the event it would be an absurdity to consider the winner the champion golfer of the world.  This is the kind of pretentiousness which may have been justified at the outset when there was one tournament, but no longer makes a lick of sense and clearly was ridiculous for many decades.  Keep the titles, by all means, but let's not make believe they mean the same thing now they did in 1860.

There is no more reason that the British Open winner is the Champion of the World than there is reason to consider the winner of any other event the Champion Golfer of the World.  And this really, is the root of the problem.  Circumstances changed but there are some on the far side of the pond who cling to the days when being at the top of the British Empire in almost anything was to be top of the world.  That isn't the case any more, socially, politically, culturally, or golf-wise.  So now they are reduced to worrying about what we call things.  Thankfully, most brits have a little more common sense.


Wouldn't it have been the World Champion  when it was only played there and nowhere else and was the only Open tournament?

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This discussion occurs every year it seems.  I guess the R&A; has a right to call it whatever they want. As long as they don't complain about our "World Series" I won't complain about their "The Open".

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This discussion occurs every year it seems.  I guess the R&A; has a right to call it whatever they want. As long as they don't complain about our "World Series" I won't complain about their "The Open".


Yes. It is like the passing of the seasons. :-)

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