Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Skruf93

Too late to become a pro?

22 posts in this topic

Hello everyone! Im 20 years old, and im wondering what you guys thinks about the chances for a 20 y/o boy to become a pro? My hcp at the moment is around 10. If i give all, and dedicates a lot of my time to golf, do you think I can become a professional player some time?

Best regards

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Want to get rid of this advertisement? Sign up (or log in) today! It's free!

Hello everyone! Im 20 years old, and im wondering what you guys thinks about the chances for a 20 y/o boy to become a pro? My hcp at the moment is around 10. If i give all, and dedicates a lot of my time to golf, do you think I can become a professional player some time?

Best regards

Really tough to say. How long have you been playing?

I do know a 15 year old who was a 6 handicap, then dedicated his entire summer and more to golf. He got down to a 2.5 (officially 4.9). I think Dan (a 36 year old) from "The Dan Plan" got down to a 4 handicap. So, there is precedence to getting down to a low single digit, but to get from there down to a +4 handicap (pro level), is quite a leap.

It seems really daunting to go from 7-8 bogies per round down to 4 birdies per round. Just think about how hard it is for you to average that many birdies.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

You should not care what other people think. It seems like a longshot but not technically impossible. I would ask myself "Why do I want to be a tour pro?" and let that guide you. If it is for fame and fortune then you probably won't find it there. But, it will take more work than you might think. There are thousands of kids younger than you in Florida that can beat you with just a putter and they will never make it to the pro level. You would have to dedicate every waking moment to this. There are loads of smaller pro tours out there than can give you a taste of the big leagues, start there. Play on some armature tour for a while, while you game is improving, that way you get some real completion under your belt and you wont go broke in the process. There are probably more people that would try to talk you out of it than say go for it. Id tell you go for it. Just realize that its a long road. You claim to be a 10-12 handicap based on your posting and screen name thingy. I don't know how long you have been playing or anything like that, but keep in mind guys on the pro level tours, NGA, Web, PGA, are well over the + range. There are people who are scratch golfers who think they are good and would never make a cut at scratch. Just set incremental goals, and shoot for them. If nothing else you will become a better player, and you can at least say you tired. Another thing I might suggest is find a teacher you can trust. I wouldn't start out and say you want to go pro, but you need proper instruction. Play against anyone and everyone in any type of weather. But most important, remember, its a game, have fun! Good luck to you and welcome aboard.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for answers! I started playing golf when i was around 8. I loved the game, and so did my friends. The problem is that I played soccer aswell. At that time I was "pushed" to play soccer instead. So I've been on and off from the game, but I know that I'm talented. When I started playing golf i fell in love with the game very fast. I could play 12 hours straight without any problems. I think I will train very hard this year and take small steps. After this year I'll know a little bit more probably. I think I can get a much better hcp within a year of serious training.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's possible. If I had to put a number on it I'd say you have a 0.0000001% chance of making it on the PGA Tour. As I said, it's technically possible.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Have you ever read Bob Rotella's "Golf is not a game of perfect"? There's a section in that book where - supposedly - there's a conversation between Tom Kite and a few college players, single digit handicappers, and they ask what's the difference between a pro and an amateur... since they shot pretty much the same score, with only a 4 stroke difference. Kite explains that it's pretty much... concentration and the ability to recover from bad shots.

Pro golf is much more than hitting the ball 340 yards... it's really about your mental game. Take a look at that book... it's a great golf manual. I love it. Rotella talks a lot about the "dreams"  of a player, and how you drive yourself and your goals towards those "dreams".

In any case, my son Nick, 14, has lessons with a great pro, who usually shoots 4-5 under par. The other day, he asked my son how often he was playing. My son answered "twice a week, on weekends". The pro's comment was: "Well, Nick, if you want to be a *good* player,  you should be playing every day. If you want to be a pro, that's a different ball game." So practice, practice, practice...

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Welcome to the site!

You've got a long long way to go from a 10 handicap to a Tour Pro but it's not impossible, just unlikely at 20 years old.  Getting to "just" a scratch handicap is going to take almost a full-time commitment, daily course access, range access and possibly a swing coach.

More important than what a bunch of strangers who've never seen your swing think, what is your plan to get there?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Have you ever read Bob Rotella's "Golf is not a game of perfect"? There's a section in that book where - supposedly - there's a conversation between Tom Kite and a few college players, single digit handicappers, and they ask what's the difference between a pro and an amateur... since they shot pretty much the same score, with only a 4 stroke difference. Kite explains that it's pretty much... concentration and the ability to recover from bad shots.

Pro golf is much more than hitting the ball 340 yards... it's really about your mental game. Take a look at that book... it's a great golf manual. I love it. Rotella talks a lot about the "dreams"  of a player, and how you drive yourself and your goals towards those "dreams".

In any case, my son Nick, 14, has lessons with a great pro, who usually shoots 4-5 under par. The other day, he asked my son how often he was playing. My son answered "twice a week, on weekends". The pro's comment was: "Well, Nick, if you want to be a *good* player,  you should be playing every day. If you want to be a pro, that's a different ball game." So practice, practice, practice...

I misread your statement earlier.

If my son could do that on a standard course, he wouldn't be in high school.

Seriously, if this is true your son should join the pros now.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Oops. The pro shoots 4-5 under par, not my son :-). My son is a 13 hcp. Sorry for the misunderstanding!!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ops. The pro shoots 4-5 under par, not my son :-). My son is a 13 hcp. Will fix the post!!

That's still pretty good for a kid that plays twice a week.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

I hear Paper Tiger is a pretty good book to read for someone who wants to make it to the pros a little bit later in life.

Though it may be discouraging (from what I've heard), it seems to be a realistic account oh how difficult it is to get on tour.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Larry Nelson proved it was possible but that list is probably still at 1.

The Champions Tour in about 30 years maybe.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Larry Nelson proved it was possible but that list is probably still at 1.

The Champions Tour in about 30 years maybe.

Wow, I actually didn't know who Larry Nelson was.

Starts at age 21 and becomes a 3 time major winner!?!? Guy must have been extremely talented.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, I actually didn't know who Larry Nelson was.

Starts at age 21 and becomes a 3 time major winner!?!? Guy must have been extremely talented.


Yep. Pretty amazing.

He probably figured after Vietnam golf wasn't that hard. :-D

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, I actually didn't know who Larry Nelson was. Starts at age 21 and becomes a 3 time major winner!?!? Guy must have been extremely talented.

He broke 100 the first time he played and broke 70 in his first nine months of playing!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

I think you can, yeah. Practice a lot (read this , this and this ), and play as much as you can. It's more than doable.

Most importantly: don't let anyone give you shit about it. Gotta be mentally strong.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0



  • Want to join this community?

    We'd love to have you!

    Sign Up
  • 2016 TST Partners

    GAME Golf
    PING Golf
    Lowest Score Wins
  • Posts

    • I agree with the first reply. Take some time away and give yourself an opportunity to recharge. We all have our slumps - even the tour pros. Remember, it's just a way to get some fresh air and exercise!  
    • I had a stretch like that about a month ago. For a few solid weeks (playing nearly every day), I couldn't break 80 for the life of me. I kept shooting 83, 86, 84... that sort of thing. And I think I was just trying too hard to fix everything all at once.  I started to overthink about mechanics and my confidence was low and I was tense over every shot and every putt and it all just compounded into poor scores and frustration. But then I decided to take a few days off and then followed it up with a few good sessions on the driving range where I focused on swinging smoothly and swinging within myself.  The issues I was dealing with seemed to fix themselves.  I didn't change anything about my swing, I just focused on approaching the game with "ease".  And at the moment I am playing some of the best golf in my life! Everybody goes through their slumps. Maybe just take some time away and when you return remind yourself to slow down and play within yourself. I bet that will help a lot!
    • I disagree with this. Let's take Titleist and/or Mizuno for example, the manufacturing tolerances are the same, the heads are all coming from the same factories and they all get assembled in the same building. In terms of design they probably spend much less time on the muscle back irons because there is only so much you can do with a blade design. More time goes into the design, R&D of the AP irons than the blades.
    • I was in the same place as u about 9 months ago. My home course was a very tight challenging par 66 golf course. Between the terrible hooking and the complete inability to get the golf ball in the air and the losing of 14 golf balls during one round I absolutely hit rock bottom. I was terribly depressed, angry, and heart broken. Unlike most everyone I know, golf is the only interest I possess other than my family. I own firearms but I do not hunt. I enjoy shooting and bowling over work but Im not overly passionate about either. My round on that given day concluded with me on 18 25 yards before the green aimed away from it. I retrieved the last 9 balls from my bag and hit every single one as hard as I could into the lake!!! I yelled, I cussed, I screamed, I behaved like an absolute lunatic. Broken and ashamed, I returned to my car and swore that no matter what I was done for six weeks. I had lost control and track of my priorities. I was holding golf above all else including my beautiful wife and amazing young son. Im ashamed to admit that esp publicly, but golf had consumed me. It was hell, but for six weeks; no golf channel, no golf browsing, no sand trap visits, didnt touch a golf ball or golf club. After six weeks and re prioritizing my life (getting my shit together) I returned refreshed and re discovered my love for the game. And now Ive dropped 8 strokes from my handicap and have done so while playing much longer more difficult courses. And MOST importantly Ive learned to balance golf with life and things that actually matter. Like family!! If u have reached the point u are at now, u are in danger of becoming me. RUN!!! Dont walk...RUN away from golf before its too late. For six weeks ignore all things golf at any and all costs!! Then come back and see what happens. Hopefully u rekindle your passion, if not, theres no law that says u must play golf. There comes a point where giving it up is the right move. ;) But I bet it doesnt come to that. Best of luck!!!!  P.s. Golf takes a lot of time away from the ones we love. Spend that extra time with those u cherish most. 
  • TST Blog Entries

  • Images

  • Today's Birthdays

  • Blog Entries