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Todd Ruggere

Know any really good golfers that completely quit due to frustration?

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12 minutes ago, JonMA1 said:

I wonder if the really good players are thinking that's exactly what you're doing.

Lol! Well, I don’t usually play with really good players. I play with one of the pros at my club..but he knows my game so....But it’s quite obvious I care. I may enter the ‘hit the ball and chase it around’ phase ...but it’s quite obvious I’m not enjoying it nor not caring.

But again, you’re lucky as hell to be able to enjoy hacking it around. That’s a remarkable gift.

Edited by Vinsk

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I used to put the work in and it would pay off. You get older and it doesn't. They put a TOPGOLF one block from my house 2 years ago. They had an introductory special - I could hit balls from 9-12 five days a week for $100 a month for 3 months! Opened in the winter and I got in on it. Hit 1500 balls a week. Went on the course and couldn't hit anything. Had back pains and those mats are no freaking good anyway because they mask chunkies. Guys asked me why my game deteriorated like this. I told them: I practiced.

Bobby Jones, Lorena, Annika, Byron - all quit early so if you pack it in you're in good company!

Somebody said they envied the butchers and hacks who shoot 110 and have fun. I agree. I wish I could do that but I can't. I also envy the guys on Maury Povich who come on with 13 kids from 9 different women and are laughing it up without a care in the world. I can't do that either!

Listen, when your longest shot of the day is the mishit on a 10 foot bunker shot that travels 159 yards and almost kills a guy on another hole then maybe, just maybe, you might want to put the sticks on Craigslist.

 

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I don't know any "good" golfers who quit in frustration..

I know one who quit because he no longer could improve his game. Once he reached his best, the game no longer was any interest to him.

I have known a few, who due to frustration, had to buy new clubs. :-O

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8 hours ago, Vinsk said:

Lol! Well, I don’t usually play with really good players. I play with one of the pros at my club..but he knows my game so....But it’s quite obvious I care. I may enter the ‘hit the ball and chase it around’ phase ...but it’s quite obvious I’m not enjoying it nor not caring.

I can understand that. I'm going to guess that you've been playing all/most of your life?  I came to golf late in life (late 30s) and was never particularly athletic so I'm realistic about my ability and potential. If I played all my life, I'd have a much different attitude toward the game.

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2 minutes ago, krupa said:

I can understand that. I'm going to guess that you've been playing all/most of your life?  I came to golf late in life (late 30s) and was never particularly athletic so I'm realistic about my ability and potential. If I played all my life, I'd have a much different attitude toward the game.

Yeah. I started playing around 8-10 years old (I’m 48). I had a very athletic life and did quite well in all my sports. Golf has been the most difficult by far. For whatever reason though I’ve never wanted to be good at anything more than golf. In all my sports nothing feels more gratifying than a good golf shot. I think my biggest frustration is that my main obstacle is the shanks. You can survive a round of golf with a slice or a hook, not a wonderful experience, but doable. The shanks however render a game impossible. I’ve had rounds where I literally hit every fairway only to shank the approach shot usually either ob, water hazard or so far over the adjacent fairway that I just have to play it as an ob. Those are days when I can certainly understand the people who just quit.

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One of the sales reps i worked with used to play on the Euro Pro tour a number of years ago. I asked him why he quit pro golf and he told me he was on the 1st tee of the 2nd round of a tournament and hit his shot into the trees right. He hit a provisional and the same thing happened. He grabbed his clubs and walked off the course and didnt play profesionally again.

He ended up selling Sponge Bob Square Pants hospital scrubs before moving in to Orthopaedics. He said its just so hard to make a living playing tour golf on the lower rungs of the profession and after a while the frustration of putting all that work into it for little/no reward is pretty soul destroying.

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I've had the shanks for about 6-9 months. Took a while off then finally it looks like I've cured them by starting from scratch again with notes I took during my lessons way way back now (2-3 years ago now). A couple weeks have passed and I'm hitting the ball consistently well again with a completely different feel (before it felt awful over the ball and mid-swing).

@RussUK I have a similar story. Probably most people know at least one person that has a similar story. Friend of mine in middle and high school played tennis. Everyone said he'd be a pro one day. Played every day for a a decade or more and was instructed nearly every day of the week by the most elite instructors in our area (cost his parents an absolute fortune). Was one of the top players for our school team, but couldn't get a scholarship or anything. He was growing and getting bigger and slower. He was naturally more big-boned, so he just couldn't make it across the court fast enough to get to the next level. My interpretation was that hurt him a lot, although he ended up fine in finance/banking somewhere. This is why I'll steer my children away from ever wanting to actually commit to improving in a sport "to one day be at the pro level." Competitive sports are one thing, practicing hard to be better is also one thing, but the mindset to "one day I'll become a pro" over years of dedication and work I feel is just not that great of a way to grow up... By the way when I say "pro" I mean a playing/touring pro. A teaching/other pro ("paid in the field of") I'd have no issue with.

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17 hours ago, Vinsk said:

But again, you’re lucky as hell to be able to enjoy hacking it around. That’s a remarkable gift.

Ha ha. As is the way you hand out those backhanded compliments @Vinsk .:beer:

Seriously, it's not like us crappy players enjoy the high scores. They are simply part of the package. They come with the territory when you want to experience this...

8 hours ago, Vinsk said:

In all my sports nothing feels more gratifying than a good golf shot.

I can fail to break 100 while hitting several good golf shots. They are what keeps me coming back. Sadly, it only takes a few really poor shots to offset those. On the opposite end, I can score below my average and still be spittin' mad at myself. I can almost count on one hand how many times I've enjoyed an entire round and not cared a little about the score or shot results. It's golf and frustration is a big part of it.

Since the topic is about good players who have quit, I'll try to stay on track.

It seems like a pretty easy concept. We all have had goals in regards to golf and many of us have fallen short of those. I can't see much difference between that reality hitting a single digit player and a high capper - assuming both have poured every thing into getting better. Either we're able to rationalize it, or we simply find something else to occupy our free time. But I can't understand staying with something you hate. Life is too short to be miserable when we have a choice.

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18 minutes ago, JonMA1 said:

Ha ha. As is the way you hand out those backhanded compliments @Vinsk .:beer:

Seriously, it's not like us crappy players enjoy the high scores. They are simply part of the package. They come with the territory when you want to experience this...

I can fail to break 100 while hitting several good golf shots. They are what keeps me coming back. Sadly, it only takes a few really poor shots to offset those. On the opposite end, I can score below my average and still be spittin' mad at myself. I can almost count on one hand how many times I've enjoyed an entire round and not cared a little about the score or shot results. It's golf and frustration is a big part of it.

Since the topic is about good players who have quit, I'll try to stay on track.

It seems like a pretty easy concept. We all have had goals in regards to golf and many of us have fallen short of those. I can't see much difference between that reality hitting a single digit player and a high capper - assuming both have poured every thing into getting better. Either we're able to rationalize it, or we simply find something else to occupy our free time. But I can't understand staying with something you hate. Life is too short to be miserable when we have a choice.

Very well said. That wasn’t actually a backhanded compliment...I truly admire those who can enjoy a day of golf regardless what their score is.  It’s a jab at myself in that all of what you said is true and I should have a better outlook on it. If I had a good playing partner it’d be different. I’m too stubborn to believe that someone who was damn good at football, soccer, MMA, pool, Ping Pong, tennis, diving, racquetball and manged to survive the jungles of Africa and become a physician can’t shoot 75 on a regular basis. Shanks. They are my albatross. It’s mystifying. Lol. 

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10 hours ago, Vinsk said:

Yeah. I started playing around 8-10 years old (I’m 48). I had a very athletic life and did quite well in all my sports. Golf has been the most difficult by far. For whatever reason though I’ve never wanted to be good at anything more than golf. In all my sports nothing feels more gratifying than a good golf shot. I think my biggest frustration is that my main obstacle is the shanks. You can survive a round of golf with a slice or a hook, not a wonderful experience, but doable. The shanks however render a game impossible. I’ve had rounds where I literally hit every fairway only to shank the approach shot usually either ob, water hazard or so far over the adjacent fairway that I just have to play it as an ob. Those are days when I can certainly understand the people who just quit.

Your second thru fifth sentences describe me perfectly. The only difference is I started in my early 50's. I'm going through my "golf hell" right now" In November my Handicap got to the lowest its ever been. I go up to NY for the holidays then, and don't get to play until I get back down here after Christmas. I decided to spend that time taking lessons. Both to improve the OTP move I had, and make a concerted effort to make this year the one when I would become a mid to high single digit player. The better players at my club all said it was very realistic for me to attain my goal, some even felt I could do it on my own simply by putting in more practice time at the range. Despite the fact we have a beautiful practice facility, I rarely used it, much preferring to just go play. Well, I took some lessons. Despite the praise, "you're really getting it" from the instructor, I never felt that way. When I got back down here, my "new" swing proved I was right, I wasn't "getting it". Playing 3x a week, my handicap went up 5!!!! strokes after the 4/1 revision from January. One guy I know gave me a book "A Life Well Played" by Arnold Palmer 2 weeks ago. He said to read it, there were some things in it that would help. I realized immediately what he meant, I had to at some point "own my swing". Sure, work on some things, but you can't be changing things after every few bad swings or round. Granted, your swing must be better then decent, but if it is, stick with it. Refine it. I'm athletic enough, that in the weeks since, I've been able to take a improved transistion move from the lessons, and combine it with my "natural" swing. That has me finally tracking back down. Last week I ordered LSW, and will use the information there on what and how to practice. These last few months have taught me how hard the game can be, but I still want to reach the goal I set, but this time I want to try it my way.

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41 minutes ago, Vinsk said:

Very well said. That wasn’t actually a backhanded compliment...I truly admire those who can enjoy a day of golf regardless what their score is.  It’s a jab at myself in that all of what you said is true and I should have a better outlook on it. If I had a good playing partner it’d be different. I’m too stubborn to believe that someone who was damn good at football, soccer, MMA, pool, Ping Pong, tennis, diving, racquetball and manged to survive the jungles of Africa and become a physician can’t shoot 75 on a regular basis. Shanks. They are my albatross. It’s mystifying. Lol. 

My apologies. I now understand you were being sincere. But it would have been ok. I ridicule my game every chance I get. Lol.

You have a good game @Vinsk. There's no way you get to an 8 without doing a lot things right. I think the game just has a way of rubbing our noses in whatever weaknesses we have.

Before you give me too much credit for being so emotionally stable, you might appreciate this...

My playing partner has the beginning stages of Parkinson's. He was a little better than me when we first played together a few years ago, but over that time I've improved a little and he has gotten worse. So while I'm cussing myself up one side and down the other for missing easy putts, not landing every approach shot on the green, and failing to break 90, he's happy just to be out there trying to hold off the damage the disease brings. I feel really stupid when I lose it and can't help but ask myself "what the f*** am I complaining about?".

He's one of the good ones and deserves a better partner than me. He's fully aware of where his game currently is and that it's not going to get any better. Yet, he still gets out there every chance he can. 

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2 minutes ago, JonMA1 said:

My apologies. I now understand you were being sincere. But it would have been ok. I ridicule my game every chance I get. Lol.

You have a good game @Vinsk. There's no way you get to an 8 without doing a lot things right. I think the game just has a way of rubbing our noses in whatever weaknesses we have.

Before you give me too much credit for being so emotionally stable, you might appreciate this...

My playing partner has the beginning stages of Parkinson's. He was a little better than me when we first played together a few years ago, but over that time I've improved a little and he has gotten worse. So while I'm cussing myself up one side and down the other for missing easy putts, not landing every approach shot on the green, and failing to break 90, he's happy just to be out there trying to hold off the damage the disease brings. I feel really stupid when I lose it and can't help but ask myself "what the f*** am I complaining about?".

He's one of the good ones and deserves a better partner than me. He's fully aware of where his game currently is and that it's not going to get any better. Yet, he still gets out there every chance he can. 

Yeah those kinds of stories hit home. I’ve got no business being as bitter as I am about my shanks. But it reminds me of a funny joke:

Guy gets paired up with a player who has a partially amputated left arm and a prosthetic right leg. He actually goes around hitting the ball damn nicely. The guy is making sure he doesn’t complain at all as he can only imagine how hard it must be for the disabled guy. At the 14th hole our guy hits his first shank. Remaining calm and cheerful, the shanks riddle his game for the rest of the round. All the while not saying a word. The round ends they head to the bar when the disabled guy says, ‘Hey I know those guys over there do you mind if I head over there..it was great playing with you.’ Our guy says sure no problem..I enjoyed it as well.

10 minutes later our guy calls over the waitress and says, ‘ I’d like to send over a drink to my friend there...that amazing guy with the prosthetic leg who just played a great round of golf..”

Waitress says, ‘Oh...well...ok..that’s funny because he just sent me over to bring you a beer...he says you have such amazing composure and can’t imagine how hard it must be for you.”

lol. Golf is hard.

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19 hours ago, Fitcat21 said:

I used to put the work in and it would pay off. You get older and it doesn't. They put a TOPGOLF one block from my house 2 years ago. They had an introductory special - I could hit balls from 9-12 five days a week for $100 a month for 3 months! Opened in the winter and I got in on it. Hit 1500 balls a week. Went on the course and couldn't hit anything. Had back pains and those mats are no freaking good anyway because they mask chunkies. Guys asked me why my game deteriorated like this. I told them: I practiced.

 

I'll go hit a small bucket maybe once every two weeks, but I'd much rather play. When I was in my late teens, early 20's I lived at the range! But, my game was improving, but that's not the case anymore.

As for the shanks, I fell into a rash of them some years ago. Only on partial wedges. I never shanked a full wedge or any other iron, but a 50 yard wedge shot filled me with fear. So, I resolved to practice my way out of it.I took my shag bag and wedge to a local course that had a chipping green to practice short pitches. I proceeded to shank 12 in a row!

That's when something I had read in Harvey Penick's Little Red Book flared into my consciousness. Seemed that one of his college golfer was having trouble with shanking. So, Penick takes him out to the practice tee and bets him that he can't shank 10 in a row, which the student immediately does! Penick tells him to go home and come back tomorrow.

So, that's what I did. I put my shag balls bag in the bag and went home! No sense practicing something bad. Eventually, they went away by themselves, but I still get that eerie feeling. Oddly enough, if I pitch with a 9 iron I never shank! Don't know why, but I'm using that club a lot more for shorter pitches. I just open the clubface a little.

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There's no way to go from a single digit handicap to that guy that gets a quad on the first hole and proudly proclaims, "I'm just out here for the exercise anyway." That statement somehow excuses the ineptitude you're gonna witness for the next 17 holes. Do you wanna be that guy after your game meets father time? Give it up before that happens. You want exercise? Go for a jog, get a treadmill, do something where you don't look a mental patient.

Then there's the guy that makes a 40 footer on the last hole for a 117 and chirps, "That's the shot that brings me back." You kill yourself long before this degree of Alzheimer's kicks in. At this point I'd rather work on my lawn, down a Miller or two, and partake in 420 celebrations than shoot 90 and look like a spaz. Remember, you look ridiculous out there at some point . You have to have the insight to recognize this and shut it down. You're playing croquet out there with $1200 worth of golf implements. WTF are you doing?? Who convinced you that shooting triple digits is golf? Find that person and snap his precious Vokey in half right in front of him!  hahahahahaha

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On 4/10/2018 at 2:39 AM, Fitcat21 said:

Used to break 80 half the time

I'm not sure that meets the "really good golfers" criteria.

Welcome to the site, @Fitcat21, but if you've quit playing golf, I'm surprised you'd join a forum to post about it. Perhaps you can say why?

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1 minute ago, iacas said:

I'm not sure that meets the "really good golfers" criteria.

Welcome to the site, @Fitcat21, but if you've quit playing golf, I'm surprised you'd join a forum to post about it. Perhaps you can say why?

My best was one a one under 71 on a 7,000 yard course. In my book that's halfway decent. If you and Jimmy can shoot 58 then congrats. 95% of the guys on all the courses I played can't break 90. Everything is relative. I have no ego here. I agree with you, I suck. Happy now? lol

The topic is about quitting. I quit. I was interested to see if others felt the same way about the situation. Also, I'm doing a public service. Here's what you do: Tape the swings of the guys who suck and show them what they look like. Most will be disgusted and realize they are clueless hacks and will thank you for pointing out how ridiculous they look and how much money you have just saved them. This is 100% fact. I did this taping initially because they wanted to identify and correct their swing flaws so they urged me to do it. Reality set in when they saw they could not correct any swing flaws because they had no swing to begin with. Most then bought fishing poles.

 

 

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2 minutes ago, Fitcat21 said:

The topic is about quitting.

The topic is about "really good golfers" who quit. The OP discusses a two handicapper, which you were not. You don't meet that criteria.

As for the rest of your bullshit, not a bit of it is "100% fact," and if you've quit golf, then you won't have much use for a golf forum. So have a great time on your fishing forum of choice.

Cuz otherwise, what's the goal here? To get people who care enough about golf to join and participate in a golf forum to quit by bumping a year-old topic? Ooookay. Good luck with that.

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28 minutes ago, Fitcat21 said:

There's no way to go from a single digit handicap to that guy that gets a quad on the first hole and proudly proclaims, "I'm just out here for the exercise anyway." That statement somehow excuses the ineptitude you're gonna witness for the next 17 holes. Do you wanna be that guy after your game meets father time? Give it up before that happens. You want exercise? Go for a jog, get a treadmill, do something where you don't look a mental patient.

Then there's the guy that makes a 40 footer on the last hole for a 117 and chirps, "That's the shot that brings me back." You kill yourself long before this degree of Alzheimer's kicks in. At this point I'd rather work on my lawn, down a Miller or two, and partake in 420 celebrations than shoot 90 and look like a spaz. Remember, you look ridiculous out there at some point . You have to have the insight to recognize this and shut it down. You're playing croquet out there with $1200 worth of golf implements. WTF are you doing?? Who convinced you that shooting triple digits is golf? Find that person and snap his precious Vokey in half right in front of him!  hahahahahaha

I am that guy who's  single digit game is slowly going south due to getting older. Me and father time are best buddies when it comes to golf. Wouldn't trade the past history, or what ever the future of my game has in store for me for anything.

Yeah, I am there for the exercise, but that's just part of it. I still have competitive value in my game. Sure, I can't out perform a legit low capper, but I can still hold my own against a large number of those who play the game. 

Another part of golf is also getting out there with life long friends, talking old timer's smack with each other. So what if John can't remember his score on that last hole. We do. 

We older guys have something in golf the youngsters don't and may never have. Those are a life time of great memories to get us through our aging process.  

Yep that day will come when us older guys, after shooting triple digits for a few years have to clean our clubs one last time. I suspect we won't be able work in our garden either. 

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