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Kieran123

Exercises to improve stability and balance

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If you have access to a bosu ball(half a ball with a flat plate in the other side) do just body weight squats. Your quick twitch muscles will be firing off like crazy as you squat down. The more you do them the stronger those little muscles get stronger and you’ll notice your legs/ hips and ankles shaking much less and eventually not shaking at all. Make sure the ball side is down and you stand on the flat side. 

Edited by CaseyD

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On 1/16/2019 at 4:00 AM, mrjohnsmitt said:

Really, once you're an adult your balance ability is pretty much set. As long as you have cause to use it you'll keep it. I'm not sure that you can do much to increase your balance (I could be totally wrong here, but I know that I've read something to that effect). 

Balance is definitely something that can be trained as a lot of it has to do with core strength. Stronger core muscles will increase your ability to balance. One of my old gym goals was to stand on a stability ball and that's something I can work towards; it's not like just because I'm an adult I can never learn to do that or handstands or something.

On 1/16/2019 at 4:00 AM, mrjohnsmitt said:

And I'd imagine that Ice skating, snowboarding is likely going to be better for this than anything that you can do in the gym.

I actually believe in the opposite. Training properly in the gym will help you be better at skating and snowboarding. 

Lots of gym exercises can help train balance and stability. Unsurprisingly, most of them involve training while unbalanced: single leg deadlifts or squats, renegade rows, single arm dumbbell press, etc. Generally anything done on a stability ball or ball will train your balance. You can even do regular lifts on balance balls which will challenge your core stability. Lots of good stuff in yoga, too.

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1 minute ago, billchao said:

Balance is definitely something that can be trained as a lot of it has to do with core strength. Stronger core muscles will increase your ability to balance. One of my old gym goals was to stand on a stability ball and that's something I can work towards; it's not like just because I'm an adult I can never learn to do that or handstands or something.

I agree. Losing weight, being more active, and practicing balance has improved my stability tremendously over the past decade. I have more athleticism at the age or 34 than I did at 24. Though I might be slightly more injury prone :-P

 

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Balance is something most people overlook especially young people who tend to focus on strength training.  Balance is having a strong core, but it is also about strong legs and it is also about being mobile. Remember all the muscles are connected and we want them to respond that way as one unit. 

So we want to build a strong flexible muscle that will respond to the activity that is being presented. I work with some high school sports teams and I have found them to be way too tight for my liking especially in the calves and hamstrings.I wonder what they will be like at 40.

  Practicing balance exercises should become a high priority as we age, but if you start young and form the habit, you will not have to worry. . It works ! I am 69 and my balance is just as good as when I was 20. 

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