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Push/Pull cart rules and/or etiquette...


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I'm playing tomorrow morning and am seriously considering bringing my micro cart since 14 of 18 holes are cart path only and it got to be a real pain a few times, I can always strap it on the power cart real fast after teeing off for the rides from the tee box.

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I have heard that in the Sandbelt region of Australia, players go right across the greens with their walking carts.

That's true, assuming your wheels are wide ish. Their assumption is that if everyone goes around the outer edge of the green then there'll be an eventual buildup of damage, and people will often putt from a long way off the green because it's so difficult to get a wedge to stick (thanks Royal Melbourne!). From time to time they disallow it but I couldn't say why.

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Originally Posted by loki16 View Post

That's true, assuming your wheels are wide ish. Their assumption is that if everyone goes around the outer edge of the green then there'll be an eventual buildup of damage, and people will often putt from a long way off the green because it's so difficult to get a wedge to stick (thanks Royal Melbourne!).

From time to time they disallow it but I couldn't say why.

I do remember reading this too about Australia.

Here it is: http://www.golfdigest.com/golf-courses/golf-travel/2012-05/golf-in-australia-geoff-shackelford

Quote:

The Australian Way

Why dragging a pushcart over a green is a good thing (and other secrets to make golf more fun and affordable).

Quote:
And when golfers approach the greens, they're encouraged to push the unit right on across. That simple act--which never feels right to an American no matter how many times you do it--toughens and smooths the greens in the thinking of Australian superintendents. And in a practical sense, it saves an immense amount of pushcart time avoiding the annoying circumvention of what Americans coddle: the putting surface. With less of the chemical dependence that can lead to thatch build-up and the need for frequent aerification, it's no coincidence that Australians sport firmer, faster, smoother and more disease-resistant putting surfaces that are a fraction of the American price to build and maintain.
Quote:
"You in America try to grow grass," Royal Melbourne superintendent Claude Crockford once told Ben Crenshaw. "We try to keep it from growing here."
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interesting read Erik. good find


Thanks.

Obviously you are aware of the soil differences they have there, too, which I imagine affects things quite a bit. They probably have less to worry about re: soil compaction and stuff, what with the area where I live being fairly clay-heavy and their soil being far more sandy.

But it's interesting too. Never made a TON of sense to me that we can walk all over the green in spikes… but a bag that weighs 1/5th as much and which is supported on some wide wheels (some push carts have narrow wheels - I'm not talking about them) are disallowed from even getting near the FRINGE of the green.

(All that said I keep a wide berth, partly because of the soil differences actually meaning we should avoid the fringe and green, and partly because people would scream at me if I took my cart near the green :D).

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yeah different agronomic conditions play a huge role for sure. fond it interesting when Mr Davis said "They're a little bit like golfers in the U.K. in the sense that they just don't overdo their maintenance, and the expectations of golfers aren't quite as high in terms of having perfect wall-to-wall conditions, which directly is reflected in the cost to play the game,"

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Where did you get that from?

There is a greater variation in ground conditions and the agronomy of course that in most other parts of the world. Links, heathland, parkland, wet, dry, sand, clay, limestone. You name it we have it.

Playing costs are directly related to maintenance costs which are directly related to the agronomy and the requirement and willingness of members to pay an appropriate amount for an appropriate quality.

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There is a greater variation in ground conditions and the agronomy of course that in most other parts of the world.

Not sure why you said that since nothing he quoted had to do with soil and agronomy… The United States, simply by virtue of its size, has quite a few soil conditions. For example, I doubt the UK has too many golf courses built on top of lava like we have in Hawaii. :)

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Agronomy and ground conditions affect the cost of maintenance, which affects the cost of playing, which affects the players' attitudes to course quality.

Players in the UK never take trolleys on the green and only the lazy take them on the fringe.

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Where did you get that from?

There is a greater variation in ground conditions and the agronomy of course that in most other parts of the world. Links, heathland, parkland, wet, dry, sand, clay, limestone. You name it we have it.

Playing costs are directly related to maintenance costs which are directly related to the agronomy and the requirement and willingness of members to pay an appropriate amount for an appropriate quality.


I am well aware of this. I have been a golf course supt. for 25 years. here is the article where that quote Mr Davis made. http://www.golfdigest.com/golf-courses/golf-travel/2012-05/golf-in-australia-geoff-shackelford.

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