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Do Not Use a Heavy Club or Weighted Donuts


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I tend to use my swing ring every few months and in 99% of cases it's because I'm playing an important round and my "feel" of the clubhead is out. It let's me get a better idea on where the clubhead is during backswing and transition so I can improve my rhythm a bit more over a few swings. I don't use it at all for training, speeding up my swing, slowing down my swing etc; only for improved rhythm and only when it's out for some reason.

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This is a good find... I played baseball at a high level and never liked using doughnuts on my bat while in the on deck circle.  Similar to what the article has explained, I would always feel l

I think that's ok. I find weighted clubs are particularly helpful for transition pieces, using slow movements or mapping. Where it gets to be an issue is when you're trying to make a full speed swing

You want to train your fast twitch muscles by doing explosive training. I swing the "Speed Whoosh" 100 times per night. You want your body/muscles to know what its like to swing fast. Alot of times

Question, possibly off topic, but close enough to throw in here. I have one of these Would this be detrimental (it's weighted obviously) if I'm using it to do ultra slomo swings? It's the only thing I can swing in the house, I'm too tall.

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FWIW, I found swinging anything in the house is detrimental even in front of the mirror. I tend to get myself out of position because I'm worried about hitting something like a piece of furniture. So when I go to the driving range I line up too close to the ball or do something else wrong, and it takes at least a dozen or more shanks before I get my position right again, so I don't do anything at home anymore. I found it did more harm than good. Better to work it out at the range with a mirror.

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Question, possibly off topic, but close enough to throw in here. I have one of these

Would this be detrimental (it's weighted obviously) if I'm using it to do ultra slomo swings? It's the only thing I can swing in the house, I'm too tall.


I have one of those. I find that for me it:

- Weakens my grip from what I normally play.
- Creates an unnecessary closing of the "face" due to the bend in the bar.
- Creates an incorrect rhythm for me.
- Can't feel any type of pressure point in the right index finger when swinging it.
- Isn't the correct weight for a wedge, an iron or a wood (both with and without the weight in the end)

It currently gathers dust as it's "purpose" right now. ;)

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Quote:

Originally Posted by boogielicious

Thanks for posting @iacas .  I do have a couple of club weights (I have reviewed them in the equipment section).  I have been using them less frequently and tend to only use them for rotational stretching only and not swinging as I would at a ball.

I think I'll start a thread in the Fitness Section for people to post their warm up routines (apart from hitting balls).  I wonder if I could recruit you and @mvmac to post your warm up routines.

One more thing.  Would this apply to the Orange Whip too?

Quote:

Originally Posted by billchao

I'd say probably. I've never hand any desire to use it as a swing trainer, just a stretching tool. Like @DrvFrShow says, it doesn't feel like a real club and I find it's hard to swing it exactly like a real club anyway.

If it does extend to the orange whip that basically screws up my back up plan for winter swing training. I was hoping it would help me "kick the flip".... I guess back to the drawing board.


This is my concern. I've been looking into getting one this winter, but I suppose I'll have to rely on the net.

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This is a good find...

I played baseball at a high level and never liked using doughnuts on my bat while in the on deck circle.  Similar to what the article has explained, I would always feel like my swing was "off' or "weird" after taking several big hacks with the doughnut on so I always figured it would be best to take those swings normally with my bat and stretch out prior to entering the batters box.

That being the case, in golf I've never attempted to use any weighted objects.  1, because I am already happy with my swing speed and 2, being how complex the golf swing is, I don't want anything to interfere with it prior to a round; especially, trying to swing a heavy club of some sort that could easily throw my mechanics off.

If people want to find speed in their swing, they are better off doing gym work like plyometrics / core exercises using medicine balls, etc.  Or if the objective is to just warm up prior to the round, instead of using a weighted club, spend the 20 minutes you would air swinging the weighted club in stretching.  Most people have never "really" properly stretched and when you actually to properly stretch, you really feel loose which (of course) helps with freedom in the swing.

BINGO!!!!!! Your spot on!

Over the 40 years I've played I've had stretches where I was a serious gym-rat always working primarily on aerobic and core exercises because that's what my body type requires to stay trim, strong, and flexible for golf. Every time I was in one of my gym-rat modes I always gained distance,,,always! When I'd get lazy and take 6 months to a year off my mid section would start to grow, and I would start to lose flexibility, strength and of course distance.

I do have a weighted club I bought a few years back but never really liked swinging it at full speed. I'll only use it occasionally now swinging a slow-motion drill but I think the work I do in the gym with medicine balls and dumbbells is much more effective along with an extensive stretching routine.

I'm 49 years old now and if there is one thing that "for me" is a big key is stretching prior to a workout or a round of golf. I go through an entire stretching routine before I hit a golf ball that doesn't include holding or using a golf club.

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Before I leave the house for the course, I do 3 sets of 100 crunches to loosen up my back. I always stretch for several minutes before the round as well. Advil helps too. :-)
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I read a Tom Watson trick once.  Turn the club upside down and swing that to warm up.  Then your regular club has greater feel.

Meaning flipped over toe down or grip the end with the clubhead?

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Before I leave the house for the course, I do 3 sets of 100 crunches to loosen up my back. I always stretch for several minutes before the round as well. Advil helps too.


I'm not too sure if sit-ups are the best thing you should be doing to loosen up your back .....

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I wonder if the results apply to slow motion work with a weighted club to reinforce technique. Every time I've seen someone using a weighted club, they were swinging slowly and trying to create muscle memory.

My question as well. Swing changes with a weighted club to reinforce technique, muscle memory, etc.

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Pretzel

I wonder if the results apply to slow motion work with a weighted club to reinforce technique. Every time I've seen someone using a weighted club, they were swinging slowly and trying to create muscle memory.

My question as well. Swing changes with a weighted club to reinforce technique, muscle memory, etc.

I think that's ok. I find weighted clubs are particularly helpful for transition pieces, using slow movements or mapping. Where it gets to be an issue is when you're trying to make a full speed swing with a heavy club your body is going to put the breaks on so you don't injure yourself. Do this enough and you'll train the body to always put the breaks on.

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Question, possibly off topic, but close enough to throw in here. I have one of these

Would this be detrimental (it's weighted obviously) if I'm using it to do ultra slomo swings? It's the only thing I can swing in the house, I'm too tall.

That's like the one I have but with a different head on it (mine has a solid weighted driver head).

To reiterate: this is a weightlifting device , not really a scientific swing trainer.  Treat it as such.  If you spend off-days swinging it with maximum effort, you will build muscle in your forearms, back, wrists, etc, all of which could help you on the course.

The question becomes one of whether building muscle in these specific areas will help your golf game.  Some people think weightlifting will screw up their swing.  Some people think a little bit of it is good for your swing.  If you think bigger muscles can help, why not use a weighted club to build swing muscles just like you would use a barbell to build biceps and pectorals?

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That's like the one I have but with a different head on it (mine has a solid weighted driver head). To reiterate: this is a weightlifting device , not really a scientific swing trainer.  Treat it as such.  If you spend off-days swinging it with maximum effort, you will build muscle in your forearms, back, wrists, etc, all of which could help you on the course. The question becomes one of whether building muscle in these specific areas will help your golf game.  Some people think weightlifting will screw up their swing.  Some people think a little bit of it is good for your swing.  If you think bigger muscles can help, why not use a weighted club to build swing muscles just like you would use a barbell to build biceps and pectorals?

To reiterate the original study that was done by "Sports Science", the problem with trying to build muscle or increase clubhead speed by swinging a heavier bat/club is that the heavier bat/club does not strengthen your fast twitch muscle tissue which is the muscle tissue primarily used for a baseball/golf swing.

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