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Sang-moon Bae Faces Military Duty in South Korea

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Just a few months removed from winning the Frys.com Open in October, it looks like Sang-moon Bae is going to be called back to South Korea for military duty. http://golfweek.com/news/2015/jan/04/pga-tour-sang-moon-bae-kapalua-military-duty-korea/ [QUOTE]Sang-Moon Bae intends to play in this week's Hyundai Tournament of Champions despite the news that he faces military conscription in his native South Korea, according to a statement released by Bae's manager Friday. Bae, 28, was denied an extension to his overseas travel permit, which expired at the end of December, and must return to South Korea within 30 days of the expiration. In South Korea, all physically-able 18- to 35-year-old men must serve in the military for two years. However, the two-time PGA Tour winner is "seeking legal counsel" and plans to stay in the U.S. and play on the PGA Tour "as long as it is lawful to do so." Here is the full statement from Bae's manager: "Sang-Moon Bae is seeking legal counsel to work through the military issues in Korea. He has a valid Green Card, and Sang-Moon intends to stay in the United States as long as it is lawful to do so and play on the PGA Tour this year, beginning with next week's Hyundai Tournament of Champions in Kapalua. As this is an ongoing legal matter, he will make no additional statements until the issue is resolved." The Hyundai Tournament of Champions begins Friday at Kapalua (Hawaii) Resort.[/QUOTE]

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That's really lame. I know Russian hockey players can play hockey in international competition for Russia in lieu of their conscription duties. Wonder if San-Moon Bae can work something out with South Korea?

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He can do more good representing SK on the golf course than in the military. Hopefully the government will realize this and give him some sort a waiver. It would be a shame to interrupt what is becoming a very good career.

cubdog

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The reality is that his country is bordered by one of the most dangerous and unstable countries in the world with which they have already had one major war, and his country believes they need to be prepared to defend themselves.  I have to say it is laughable to me to think that someone should get a special exemption from what everyone else has to do because they play golf.  When did being a pro golfer become something that gets this kind of special privilege?  IMO he should fulfill his obligation, as great golfers such as Hogan and Snead did before him, or renounce his citizenship.

Sometimes we need to step outside of the golf world into the wider one.

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The reality is that his country is bordered by one of the most dangerous and unstable countries in the world with which they have already had one major war, and his country believes they need to be prepared to defend themselves.  I have to say it is laughable to me to think that someone should get a special exemption from what everyone else has to do because they play golf.  When did being a pro golfer become something that gets this kind of special privilege?  IMO he should fulfill his obligation, as great golfers such as Hogan and Snead did before him, or renounce his citizenship.

Sometimes we need to step outside of the golf world into the wider one.

what about a conscientious objector?

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what about a conscientious objector?

I've always thought of the conscientious objector as one that has a foundation to stand on when his country is the aggressor, but when you are defending your own country on your own land then that really loses meaning to me anyway, because even if you were not enlisted you would pick up your pitched fork and go fight rather than have your family subject to humiliation if you sit by and object. SK is the defending party in this case, so it makes little sense that anyone could say I object to defending my home country. I'm sure others might know better, but don't you need to really show merit to get granted the CO status anyway?

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The reality is that his country is bordered by one of the most dangerous and unstable countries in the world with which they have already had one major war, and his country believes they need to be prepared to defend themselves.  I have to say it is laughable to me to think that someone should get a special exemption from what everyone else has to do because they play golf.  When did being a pro golfer become something that gets this kind of special privilege?  IMO he should fulfill his obligation, as great golfers such as Hogan and Snead did before him, or renounce his citizenship.

Sometimes we need to step outside of the golf world into the wider one.


I stand by my comment that Bae is of greater value to his country playing golf than being in the military. There are many ways to serve your country besides donning a uniform. BTW I'm a 4 year Viet Nam vet.

cubdog

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what about a conscientious objector?

What about it?  What does being a golfer have to do with being a conscientious objector?  Personally I always thought the answer to CO should be alternative service, but I have no idea what the rules are for South Korea.

I stand by my comment that Bae is of greater value to his country playing golf than being in the military. There are many ways to serve your country besides donning a uniform. BTW I'm a 4 year Viet Nam vet.

cubdog

Thanks for your service.  I remember back in those days several occasions when Mets players (I lived in NY and was a Mets fan) had to go do National Guard service for a couple of weeks during the summer as their way of fulfilling their obligation.  I was a couple of years too young for the draft, but I always wondered how guys who were getting drafted and didn't have that option felt about it.

As to our disagreement, that is OK.  Fact is it is really Bae's and SK's business, not ours anyway.

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Quote:

Originally Posted by turtleback

The reality is that his country is bordered by one of the most dangerous and unstable countries in the world with which they have already had one major war, and his country believes they need to be prepared to defend themselves.  I have to say it is laughable to me to think that someone should get a special exemption from what everyone else has to do because they play golf.  When did being a pro golfer become something that gets this kind of special privilege?  IMO he should fulfill his obligation, as great golfers such as Hogan and Snead did before him, or renounce his citizenship.

Sometimes we need to step outside of the golf world into the wider one.

I stand by my comment that Bae is of greater value to his country playing golf than being in the military. There are many ways to serve your country besides donning a uniform. BTW I'm a 4 year Viet Nam vet.

cubdog

Agree.  There are other services he could do representing South Korea while still playing.

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I've always thought of the conscientious objector as one that has a foundation to stand on when his country is the aggressor, but when you are defending your own country on your own land then that really loses meaning to me anyway, because even if you were not enlisted you would pick up your pitched fork and go fight rather than have your family subject to humiliation if you sit by and object.

If a person is a pacifist then they have a right not to want to fight. I do not think a country has a right to force a person into violence.

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If a person is a pacifist then they have a right not to want to fight. I do not think a country has a right to force a person into violence.


True, but there are plenty of other non-combat related things they can do like cook, clean, etc.

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If a country is going to have a draft for military service, I think the only exemptions should be based on physical handicap/limitations.

I have to agree with this one.  Why should the "golfer" get a pass, but the "plumber" have to put his tools down and serve?

Quote:

Originally Posted by Abu3baid

I've always thought of the conscientious objector as one that has a foundation to stand on when his country is the aggressor, but when you are defending your own country on your own land then that really loses meaning to me anyway, because even if you were not enlisted you would pick up your pitched fork and go fight rather than have your family subject to humiliation if you sit by and object.

If a person is a pacifist then they have a right not to want to fight. I do not think a country has a right to force a person into violence.

True, but there are plenty of other non-combat related things they can do like cook, clean, etc.

I agree with @CarlSpackler on this as well.

If a country is in need, I feel it has the right to demand the citizens to help in some way.

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If a person is a pacifist then they have a right not to want to fight. I do not think a country has a right to force a person into violence.

precisely.  if someone is opposed to fighting/war/violence, then that is their right.  conscripting them into some other form of service that still supports the war effort could still be against their principals.

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Quote:

Originally Posted by saevel25

If a person is a pacifist then they have a right not to want to fight. I do not think a country has a right to force a person into violence.

precisely.  if someone is opposed to fighting/war/violence, then that is their right.  conscripting them into some other form of service that still supports the war effort could still be against their principals.

So if the country is under attack some people should get free passes?

Some of the things my tax money pays for goes against my principles, I still have to pay. (this line probably falls into one of the poor argument categories that Erik posted last week... :-P )

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Quote:

precisely.  if someone is opposed to fighting/war/violence, then that is their right.  conscripting them into some other form of service that still supports the war effort could still be against their principals.

The only reason they have those rights is because others are dying to protect them. ;-)

Adding to my previous post, I don't believe a draft is a good idea unless absolutely necessary. An army of willing participants is much stronger than one with unwilling participants. Given the fact that S. Korea has a draft though, I don't see celebrity or personal belief as an exemption. Just my opinion of course.

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Quote:

The only reason they have those rights is because others are dying to protect them.

Adding to my previous post, I don't believe a draft is a good idea unless absolutely necessary. An army of willing participants is much stronger than one with unwilling participants. Given the fact that S. Korea has a draft though, I don't see celebrity or personal belief as an exemption. Just my opinion of course.

Yet it is their choice to fight and protect those rights.

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