Jump to content
IGNORED

What courses are on your British Isles Bucket List?


Note: This thread is 1506 days old. We appreciate that you found this thread instead of starting a new one, but if you plan to post here please make sure it's still relevant. If not, please start a new topic. Thank you!

Recommended Posts

Hi All, I’d be interested to know… if you only had the opportunity to come to the UK (England, Scotland, Wales and NI) or Ireland for one trip, and one trip only, in your lifetime which courses would you want to play?

To give it some boundaries let’s say the maximum length of the trip is 2 weeks, but it can be shorter was well if you’d prefer.

It would be good to see everyone’s perception of the key courses in the UK and Ireland and compare this to the views of British and Irish golfers.

Happy planning! Guy

Link to post
Share on other sites

I play in Ireland 15 years ago.

We traveled coast to coast, both North & South, East to West.

The only two courses which we could not fit into our schedule, were Royal Dublin and Old Head.

We played all the other top courses, my favorite was Ballybunion.

Great golf, the Irish are great host's, it's a beautiful place to visit.

One of the wonderful experience's, is the great history of golf at many of the clubs.

So much memorable trophies and old photo's of many of the great players.

Club Rat

Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

  • Moderator

I'm lucky, I've made a couple trips to both Scotland and Ireland.  For potential future trips, the courses I'd love to get to are:

Ireland and Northern Ireland, Ballyliffin and Royal County Down

Scotland, Cruden Bay, Prestwick, and a round with hickory-shafted clubs at Musselburgh.

From my past trips, the ones I'd try to return to every chance I get are:

Lahinch, in Ireland
Royal Dornoch, in Scotland
Both are splendid courses in really small towns  For some reason I want to try to get away from all those other people!
Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Thanks for the feedback guys. All the courses that you mention are fantastic and should be on any golfer's play list.

Dave; like you I am definitely a fan of going slightly off the beaten track and playing some of the less traffic'ed courses which are equally as good, if not better than the big names or Open Rotation courses in say Ayrshire and Fife.

BTW; I am running a poll in the office to find out which are the top UK/Irish courses in the views of the Golfbreaks.com team. I will report back. It should be interesting to compare.

In the meanwhile. Please keep posting your UK/Irish picks. Thanks, Guy

Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Moderator

I think this is an interesting topic, and I'm disappointed that we haven't heard from some of the guys who haven't made the trip to the British Isles for golf.  Could a different title bring them into the discussion, something like "What courses are on your British Isles Bucket List?"

Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

I think this is an interesting topic, and I'm disappointed that we haven't heard from some of the guys who haven't made the trip to the British Isles for golf.  Could a different title bring them into the discussion, something like "What courses are on your British Isles Bucket List?"

Thanks Dave. Good idea. Let's see if we can encourage some more of the guys to join in with the discussion. Guy

Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Administrator

Any of the courses at St. Andrews (especially the Old Course, of course, but the New Course and the Castle course are a very close second).

North Berwick.

Turnberry.

That is of the courses I have played.

Kingsbarns is on the list as well because I've heard good things about it.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

The Old Course and Carnoustie are at the top of the list. Next tier down would be Hoylake.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Old Course along with New and Castle. - I'm pretty sure I could stay in St. Andrews and

Carnoustie

Muirfield

Ballybunion

Turnberry

kingsbarn

Royal Troon

North Berwick

Royal Lytham and St. Annes

Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Being a high handicapper, Id love to experience links golf in Scotland

but with enjoyment and challenge for my level.

Western Scotland

Machrihanish Golf Course
Dunaverty Golf Club

Eastern Scotland
St Andrews Eden Course
Anstruther Golf Course
Gullane #3 Course

Like to find locals courses in smaller towns we visit.

Link to post
Share on other sites

For my next trip to the UK/Ireland I would love to play Muirfield.  Our guide (Irish) in Scotland told me that if he were to pick one course in Scotland, it would be Muirfield.

I have played the Old Course and a number of other courses mentioned.  They are all worthy of any bucket list.  I have to get my butt over there again before I get too old to walk 36.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Indeed. Muirfield is a superb golf course, you would expect it to be having hosted The Open no less than 16 times! Also, it is surrounded by a number of other top-class links courses including Gullane & Archerfield!

Link to post
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Thanks for all your posts everyone. Here are the results from the survey I ran in the office. I asked the team for their picks for their top 5 to 10 UK and Irish golf courses. The results were as follows.... (...actually 11 picks as we Brits love our soccer and cricket?1?)

1. Kingsbarns

2. Royal Dornoch

3. Royal Portrush

4. Turnberry - Ailsa Course

5. Old Course - St Andrews

6. Old Head of Kinsale

7. Ballyliffin

8. Royal County Down

9. Gullane No.1

=10 Waterville

=10 Doonbeg

It's an interesting selection and maybe not what you might expect. However the choices were influenced by the actual courses that people have played (or been lucky enough to play...).

Other contenders included: Balllybunion, Portmarnock, Carnoustie, Royal St Georges, Royal Liverpool, Royal Troon, North Berwick - West, Machrihanish - Championship, Royal Porthcawl, Gleneagles - Kings, Druids Glen, European, Trump International (Aberdeen), and Hindhead (Surrey, England).

What do you think of our picks? Do you agree? Or what have we shamelessly left out (or over promoted..)!!

I personally have a soft spot for Trevose - Championship in Cornwall (SW England)... but that is partly because I am also a water sports addict and the course overlooks Constantine Bay, one of the best surf breaks in England!  Guy

Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Moderator

I'm happy to see my personal favorite, Royal Dornoch, very near the top of the list.  I'm also happy to see that Ballyliffin, one of my potential plays next year, is on the list. As a visitor from the States, my general preference is for the historic over the newer.  I thought Kingsbarns and Doonbeg were outstanding golf courses, but I'd choose their neighbors, The Old Course at St. Andrews and Lahinch, for both the history AND the significantly lower price tag.  I did think Doonbeg had a couple of contrived holes, especially the hole with the bunker in the middle of the green.  But opinions are just that, and polls are great fuel for discussion., this is a good one.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Hi All - new boy to TST! Like most of you out there I've been lucky enough to go on quite a lot of golf tours with friends over the years and my most recent was to St Andrews and Kingsbarns. I won't pretend for one minute to be able to adequately describe The Old Course save to say it has a magical feel about it and, as the fourth course we'd played in 2 days, something in its spirit gave my sore muscles the strength to play well! Kingsbarns is sensationally beautiful and we were blessed with the hottest days I've ever known in Scotland. It's tough but aren't they all and I can easily see why it came out top of the list. I imagine it's seriously heavy going in the rain / bad weather but on a hot day it was a little like the Caribbean in certain parts, with a shimmering sea and lush, fertile woodland!

I love the RAC (Royal Automobile Club) Old Course in Surrey. Not championship as such but nestles in mature parkland, great views across the Surrey Hills and is generally stunning.

I know this is a UK topic but could I just say that northern France - Brittany region - has so many beautiful courses. The French have really got it right over the past 10 years or so and their courses are exquisite. Check out Val Andre, Saint Laurent and especially Chateau des Ormes with its original 18th Century chateau. Obviously they're not hugely famous as such but they're still challenging and a joy to play, set as they are in such beautiful countryside. And of course Le Golf National, just outside Paris, is tremendous; well tough and the 2018 Ryder Cup venue

Link to post
Share on other sites

Think Sunningdale (Old) belongs on any UK and Ireland bucket list, although probably a bit biased as I live nearby. Royal St. George's is a gem, too.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Royal St George's is a great shout... with so much great links golf in the Southport area of England - plus all over Scotland and Ireland - the Kent area often gets overlooked. I think it should definitely be on people's bucket list.

Obviously RSG is a the real star - it's a brutal links on some of the finest linksland you'll ever find. Hard to choose between that and Birkdale for title of England's No.1. Right next door is Prince's which is a lovely 27-hole links (hosted the 1932 Open won by Gene Sarazen) that's a great place to spend a day - huge amounts have been spent in recent years and it really is back to its former glory now. The onsite lodges are brand new and overlook by both Princes and RSG.. what a view that is to wake up to.

On the other side of RSG is Royal Cinque Ports, a two-time Open venue. It's a brilliant course.. a proper out and back links with some amazing fairways that modern designers need bulldozers to create. The back nine, usually played into the teeth of the wind is possibly the toughest in the UK (discuss!). I used to be a member at RCP so am a bit biased but I think it's as good as anything you'll play elsewhere in the UK!

Both Sandwich (for RSG) and Deal (for RCP) are quaint little seaside towns with plenty going on and lots of pubs/restaurants... and all less than a couple of hours from London!

Richard

Link to post
Share on other sites

Note: This thread is 1506 days old. We appreciate that you found this thread instead of starting a new one, but if you plan to post here please make sure it's still relevant. If not, please start a new topic. Thank you!

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.



  • Want to join this community?

    We'd love to have you!

    Sign Up
  • Support TST Affiliates

    TourStriker PlaneMate
    Golfer's Journal
    Whoop
    SuperSpeed
    FlightScope Mevo
    Use the code "iacas" for 10% off Mevo and the code "iacasfeb21" for 10% off SuperSpeed.
  • Posts

    • I just can't believe this on top of everything else has happened to him, he was supposed to win 25 majors and at least 10 green jackets and everything just derailed in 2009 and just setback after setback. We got a brief taste of his greatness at Augusta and then the world has to stop and just before we can see the second encore this has to happen.?When he had it all clicking in the early 2000's no one has ever played this game better than him and I don't think we will see anyone ever at least in our lifetimes dominate professional golf like he did ever. When I heard the news I just felt an emptiness I really never felt before about the game, sure the world keeps spinning on its axis but it's just never going to be the same for me on Sunday at Augusta.
    • I watched this video twice. I found it very interesting. Here's what I heard. First, I think the biggest point Mark was trying to make is that a golfer should in an ideal world built their bag one club at a time. As you go to lower and lower lofted clubs, you are more and more likely to need some help getting the ball in the air. It is hard to create proper launch conditions without enough loft. Where in the bag that happens (be it your 6 iron or your 2 iron) will depend upon your delivery, your swing speed, and it will be different for everyone. Some folks can hit a 2 iron. Other folks should drop from their 6 iron on up and go to a SGI iron or a hybrid.  Second, higher loft produces higher consistency. The trend of getting everything lower and lower lofted while possibly helping you hit the long irons, it might be hurting you in the short irons and traditionally higher lofted clubs. Loft is your friend when it comes to consistency.  Third, the further you are from target, the harder it is to hit target... No matter who you are. Fourth, higher handicap golfers are less consistent (i.e. have more bad shots) than lower handicap golfers. This creates a ton of what Mark called "noise" in the data. And with all that noise you can make an argument for anything you like. Therefore be careful when you are testing/getting fitted, because a fitter/salesperson can make what ever they want out of the data.  Finally, better players hit all clubs better. Worse players hit all clubs worse. The archer is more important than the arrow.
    • I apologize for resurrecting this thread but I thought this would be relevant information. The difference between Tiger's dip and Hogan's dip is that Hogan stopped the dip past P6 and only raised his head from that point on, even while hitting a driver. Tiger's just kept dipping past P7 and maybe P8. Mac O'Grady also raised his head in the downswing as well after his dip, just a bit earlier at P5 onwards. I believe this is a big part of the reason why Tiger needed multiple back surgeries and Hogan none, even Byron Nelson needed back surgery in his 40s as recalled in his autobiography and he definitely had a major head dip that continued past P7.  Now, I notice this head raising in downswing move after the post P4 dip only occurs with Hogan and Mac and very very very few others; I'd say 99.99% of golfers including the top tour pros today continue to dip past P6 and P7 especially with the longer clubs. That would mean only a handful of golfers in the world would truly pass Key #1 if this move was required to master it.
    • For any one wanting a cheaper sharpening option, the Accusharp is decent and requires no skill level to use.  Amazon.com  
    • Can't find the article or blog but I remember reading about Paul Wood (PING engineer) talking about how from a physics standpoint, more compact heads worked better for more skilled players. Basically a longer/wider face makes it harder for the better player to square up the face and hit the center. This bit hints at it.
  • Today's Birthdays

    1. Bearcat3253
      Bearcat3253
      (68 years old)
    2. BlackandGold
      BlackandGold
      (36 years old)
    3. CamL2016
      CamL2016
      (28 years old)
    4. charlitt
      charlitt
      (40 years old)
    5. Cpt Morgan
      Cpt Morgan
      (36 years old)

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Welcome to TST! Signing up is free, and you'll see fewer ads and can talk with fellow golf enthusiasts! By using TST, you agree to our Terms of Use, our Privacy Policy, and our Guidelines.

The popup will be closed in 10 seconds...