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Metallurgy and new technology any comments or ideas for new drivers?


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Iv'e researched a ton into metal density and how it relates to certain elements. Osmium is the densest metal on earth but is brittle and highly expensive rated at 22.6 or something. Titanium is not very dense 4.6 however it's very strong and flexible for it's weight and is used in current tech along with the tin can frame used by today's manufacturers. I think it works great I mean obviously titanium 400-460 cc drivers perform well but I wonder if there is another answer. I think Tungsten carbide is the key ''https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tungsten_carbide'' Iv'e done a little experiment dropping a pro'v1 from 12 inches into a 5 pound weight plate then a titanium nike driver head ignite to be exact 8.5 degree loft. The results were astounding the driver head rebounded one inch whereas the 5 pound weight a foot almost. Obviously the 5 pound weight is super dense being stainless steel and you couldn't swing a 5 pound driver head. but their could potentially be a speed to density ratio equation being a thin titanium head will travel 340 yards at 130 mph where a dense tungsten carbide at at 250 cc goes the same at 110 mph. The 5 pound weight test proves that density out performs speed so what's your take on new designs and tech going into what we currently have?

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Iv'e researched a ton into metal density and how it relates to certain elements. Osmium is the densest metal on earth but is brittle and highly expensive rated at 22.6 or something. Titanium is not very dense 4.6 however it's very strong and flexible for it's weight and is used in current tech along with the tin can frame used by today's manufacturers. I think it works great I mean obviously titanium 400-460 cc drivers perform well but I wonder if there is another answer. I think Tungsten carbide is the key ''https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tungsten_carbide'' Iv'e done a little experiment dropping a pro'v1 from 12 inches into a 5 pound weight plate then a titanium nike driver head ignite to be exact 8.5 degree loft. The results were astounding the driver head rebounded one inch whereas the 5 pound weight a foot almost. Obviously the 5 pound weight is super dense being stainless steel and you couldn't swing a 5 pound driver head. but their could potentially be a speed to density ratio equation being a thin titanium head will travel 340 yards at 130 mph where a dense tungsten carbide at at 250 cc goes the same at 110 mph. The 5 pound weight test proves that density out performs speed so what's your take on new designs and tech going into what we currently have?


I don't think you've even approached demonstrating "that density out performs speed." And I doubt you can because I doubt that it does.

I'm not even sure how you conducted your "test."

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I don't think you've even approached demonstrating "that density out performs speed." And I doubt you can because I doubt that it does. I'm not even sure how you conducted your "test."

It's irrelevant anyway due to CoR limits, isn't it?

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It's fairly simple guys any material will rebound a golf ball x amount of energy at x amount of speed. Faster speed with a less than ideal material could possibly perform the same as a superior metal at less speed. I'm not sure about cor it's the trampoline effect right? I think a dense metal would be like a blade 5 iron with very little if any trampoline effect so I think it would be legal. A good exapmle would be a thin sheet of ply wood wood traveling at 200 mph vs a 2 by four going 120 mph.. It's possible the could have identical energy output at different speeds.. Well anyway I can not give away to many secrets here just wanted some feedback the fact you guys don't have a clue what im talking about means im smarter than the average bear so yeah :)

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It's fairly simple guys any material will rebound a golf ball x amount of energy at x amount of speed. Faster speed with a less than ideal material could possibly perform the same as a superior metal at less speed. I'm not sure about cor it's the trampoline effect right? I think a dense metal would be like a blade 5 iron with very little if any trampoline effect so I think it would be legal. A good exapmle would be a thin sheet of ply wood wood traveling at 200 mph vs a 2 by four going 120 mph.. It's possible the could have identical energy output at different speeds.. Well anyway I can not give away to many secrets here just wanted some feedback the fact you guys don't have a clue what im talking about means im smarter than the average bear so yeah :)

The USGA set the CoR limit on driver faces at 0.83, meaning no driver will be deemed conforming if more than 83% of the energy of the collision is transferred to the ball. It doesn't matter what material the club is made from. If anything, making the driver out of tungsten instead of titanium will just make it impossibly heavy to swing. I suppose you can make it really small and sacrifice MOI if you wanted to, but good luck playing with that club.

You can't make a conforming driver that "rebounds" the ball farther than any other conforming club, which I gathered was what you were trying to demonstrate with your OP. Club manufacturers focus on making the club perform better on off-center hits (given MOI limits), speed, and playability. It still has to perform in a golfer's hands.

They do use tungsten in golf clubs and they've been doing it for a while. It's placed in certain spots when they want to manipulate CoG for certain launch conditions.

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The USGA set the CoR limit on driver faces at 0.83, meaning no driver will be deemed conforming if more than 83% of the energy of the collision is transferred to the ball. It doesn't matter what material the club is made from. If anything, making the driver out of tungsten instead of titanium will just make it impossibly heavy to swing. I suppose you can make it really small and sacrifice MOI if you wanted to, but good luck playing with that club.

You can't make a conforming driver that "rebounds" the ball farther than any other conforming club, which I gathered was what you were trying to demonstrate with your OP. Club manufacturers focus on making the club perform better on off-center hits (given MOI limits), speed, and playability. It still has to perform in a golfer's hands.

They do use tungsten in golf clubs and they've been doing it for a while. It's placed in certain spots when they want to manipulate CoG for certain launch conditions.

I want the face to be tungsten carbide. That cor thing does kinda suck

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Note: This thread is 2054 days old. We appreciate that you found this thread instead of starting a new one, but if you plan to post here please make sure it's still relevant. If not, please start a new topic. Thank you!

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