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donkba

how long to get to scratch?

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I've actually known of professional sportspeople who had good eye co-ordination who were close to doing this in a few years. All you need to do is hit the ball reasonably straight with good distance control, have a decent short game and be able to think your way around the course.

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I've actually known of professional sportspeople who had good eye co-ordination who were close to doing this in a few years. All you need to do is hit the ball reasonably straight with good distance control, have a decent short game and e able to think your way around the course.

hahaha

All you have to do is cock your arm back, put enough rotation on the ball and whip your arm through. You'll be an eight time Cy Young winner in no time.

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I've actually known of professional sportspeople who had good eye co-ordination who were close to doing this in a few years. All you need to do is hit the ball reasonably straight with good distance control, have a decent short game and e able to think your way around the course.

There's also an incredible number of pro's from other sports that struggle with golf. Golf requires much more than physical talent.

reid, added link to your book website at artfulgolfer.com. Enjoyed the sample chapter!!

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Here's an interesting perspective about becoming a good golfer:

Thanks for the article link, sound advice that. I have been able, over the last three years, to realize that it's important to have a goal; but that even if the goal is achieved, it's ultimately more important to enjoy the game, and enjoy the relationships you make because of it. That said, getting to be a better player certainly makes it more likely you'll enjoy golf, and learn to respect it.

I started playing and practicing seriously three years ago, still improving: 11/2004 -- index 16 -- joined a golf club 02/2005 -- index 17 05/2005 -- index 14 08/2005 -- index 12 11/2005 -- index 12 02/2006 -- index 13 05/2006 -- index 10 08/2006 -- index 9 11/2006 -- index 9 02/2007 -- index 9 05/2007 -- index 9 08/2007 -- index 7 11/2007 -- index 6 While I'll probably never get to 0.0, I'm still learning and improving, and enjoying the game.

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I am definately a begginer. I started out the year shooting a 52-56 on a par 35. By the end of the year, I was down to a 49. I just bought a belly putter, and a new driver. I was using a Knight driver from Meijer. I hope to be down to mid 45's by the middle of this year.

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While I'll probably never get to 0.0, I'm still learning and improving, and enjoying the game.

How can you say something like that given the scoring trend that you posted? That's a pretty negative attitude to have towards your game. It seems to me that with the scoring trend that you posted that you should have no problem becoming a 0.0 handicap within the next few years. Granted it will be more difficult to go from a 6 -> 0 than it was to go from 16 -> 6, but that doesn't mean you can't. (

Are you an AmeriCAN or AmeriCANT?

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How can you say something like that given the scoring trend that you posted? That's a pretty negative attitude to have towards your game. It seems to me that with the scoring trend that you posted that you should have no problem becoming a 0.0 handicap within the next few years. Granted it will be more difficult to go from a 6 -> 0 than it was to go from 16 -> 6, but that doesn't mean you can't. (

Heh. I did say "probably." Three reasons: first, I know how hard I've worked to get to a 6, and in order to do the more difficult 6-to-0, I'd have to work harder. Second, I'm 54. Third, I didn't start playing at all until my 40's. I occasionally play with guys who started young and have played all their lives, and it's natural for them.

I do think it's important for people to set achievable goals. Like break 90, get the index 3 shots lower, hit 50% fairways, gir, whatever. As long as your goal is readily within reach, you can usually make it. Then as you improve, your goals keep changing, and pretty soon, you've made real progress.

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I took up golf at age 23, and became serious about trying to get good at it at age 27. My goal then was to become a 2hcp or better by age 40. I was married, and kids were in the future, and I knew my career at that stage would require lots of time.

I never made it. I got as low as a 10 index for a while.

I think anyone of average coordination can get to single digits, I'm not sure about becoming a scratch. But I think someone of only average coordination could probably be close to scratch with enough teaching and practice.

I think I'm of just slightly better than average coordination. I think if I wanted to be a scratch player, I could get there in about 2 years, if:

1. I could play every day, or nearly every day, year round.
2. I had an extra hour or 2 to practice each day.
3. I took a lesson about once a month to stay sharp.

Even if my career and family life permitted this (which they don't), I'm not sure I would have the motivation to work this hard at it. I'm also starting to have problems like shoulder, elbow, and foot issues, and I'm sure if I started playing and practicing every day, that would only get worse.

So my message to you, my friend, is if you want to be a scratch player, do it quickly and very young in life, and be prepared. Unless you are a pretty gifted and talented athlete, it is very difficult to achieve.

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Heh. I did say "probably." Three reasons: first, I know how hard I've worked to get to a 6, and in order to do the more difficult 6-to-0, I'd have to work harder. Second, I'm 54. Third, I didn't start playing at all until my 40's. I occasionally play with guys who started young and have played all their lives, and it's natural for them.

I'm with Will on this one... I'm only a few years younger and started in my 40's too. Getting from 16 to where we did is a lot easier than getting from here to scratch. We're not sure we have the youth, time, or dedication to work even harder than we did to get down this far ;)

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hahaha

Not quite that easy but I think you know what I'm getting at? These people I'm talking about actually walked around the golf course for the first time in their lives (never been to the range or hit any clubs whatsoever) and scored in the low eighties for their first few rounds... Mind you the sports that they played also bore some resemblance to the game of golf (they were professional 'cricketers').

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Good article! Playing and practicing more frequently definitely helps, but for me visualization of my intended shot along with trusting that my body can do what I'm asking it to do did more to get me from 16 to 4 in 2 years than anything else... I did this w/ no lessons, used clubs, and whatever balls I found on the course (rarely pro-v1's). Well, I did buy a new Sasquatch driver.

I posted a story yesterday at artfulgolfer.com about Major James Nesmeth - who had a dream of improving his golf game, and developed a unique method of achieving his goal. Until he devised this method, he was just your average weekend golfer, shooting in mid- to low-nineties. Then, for seven years, he completely quit the game. Never touched a club. Never set foot on a fairway. When he played his next round, he shot a 74! Very inspiring story!!

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Artfulgolfer:
A few things.
First: Your website is FABULOUS. I jumped off of it to write this post but I'm heading back as soon as I'm done.
Second: Your story about the Major rang a bell with me. If (hopefullywhen) you read my book, you will see that I, while not in anywhere near the dire straights that the Major found himself in, tried to compete on the tour (I still do) while working full time as a surgeon. In other words, its almost impossible for me too, to find time to get on the golf course. Except when falling asleep hitting balls in my mind...
Thanks, you have a new subscriber

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Artfulgolfer:

Thanks reid! You'll appreciate that is was after browsing your website and reading your first chapter that I remembered that story about the Major and posted it. I found it very moving. I'm also VERY interested in reading your book and will contact you about purchasing.

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what would you say the minimum handicap would be for you to have a chance at making it on tour and what are the chances of getting to that if you were young and had lots of time (im 26 and have 12 hours practice during winter every week and every day for 8 hours during summer)

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get the services of a good driving range pro . hit 300 balls a day . play alone and play 3 balls per hole . always hit the worst lie first . learn to do draws and fades . practice doing spins with your wedges . you have the left spin and right spin . this helps keep the ball rolling towards the pin in different pin placement situations . then by 6 months you would have cut your handicap in half . another six months after you would be in the vecinity of 4 to scratch handicap . last but not the least try to one put every hole .this should bring down your handicap another two to three steps .

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what would you say the minimum handicap would be for you to have a chance at making it on tour and what are the chances of getting to that if you were young and had lots of time (im 26 and have 12 hours practice during winter every week and every day for 8 hours during summer)

I would guess the average tour player has a +4- +6 handicap. I think Lee Triveno said it best when years ago he said if you can't go to 4 courses you have never seen before and shoot 65-66 then you have no chance on tour. There is a local guy that plays to a +4 and isn't even on the Nationwide tour.

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