Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Dave325

Collared shirt? Where did this start?

Note: This thread is 1297 days old. We appreciate that you found this thread instead of starting a new one, but if you plan to post here please make sure it's still relevant. If not, please start a new topic. Thank you!

69 posts / 6660 viewsLast Reply

Recommended Posts

 My home course is a fairly rural course that has very few dress code restrictions. However, there are a number of other shwanky courses near me that have the ubiquitous collared shirt/no jeans restrictions. I can respect that... But just curious where these type of restrictions came into the game. It's not like having dressed in certain clothes makes me play any better, even though I try to sport my lucky Callaway pullover in cooler weather. If this started with the Scottish originators of the game, then shouldn't we be required to wear kilts? Just curious... And I love history too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Want to hide this ad? Register for free today!

If you look back at old golf illustrations and photos, they almost always show the players in a jacket of some type, and a shirt and tie, and generally in plus fours.  Even the episode of Shells Wonderful World of Golf with Henry Cotton and Gene Sarazen had both players in shirt and tie.  Perhaps we should be glad that things have become so much less formal than they once were.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

8 minutes ago, DaveP043 said:

If you look back at old golf illustrations and photos, they almost always show the players in a jacket of some type, and a shirt and tie, and generally in plus fours.  Even the episode of Shells Wonderful World of Golf with Henry Cotton and Gene Sarazen had both players in shirt and tie.  Perhaps we should be glad that things have become so much less formal than they once were.

I wouldn't play golf if I had to wear a tie. :-P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Hoodies are considered biz casual in CO so we're good. Our course sold course logo hoodies and tshirts this year. Seems the collared shirt code is dying. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

I think the collar thing came from golf being a "gentlemens game". The old prim and proper scenario. 

Myself, I will practice wearing just about anything. However, when I play, I always have a collared shirt handy. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

1 hour ago, Patch said:

I think the collar thing came from golf being a "gentlemens game". The old prim and proper scenario. 

Myself, I will practice wearing just about anything. However, when I play, I always have a collared shirt handy.

I do the same and actually enjoy the casual but dressed look of a collared shirt - to me it is just a nod to the history of the game and a sign of respect for the course I am  playing.  I live very close to a 9 hole executive course where jeans and a shirt with no collar are acceptable but I always dress in accordance with the requirements at most more formal courses.  If I pair up with someone in jeans and a tee shirt it makes no difference to me but I just feel better dressing the way I do.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

I've never really understood the desire to play in jeans (they're the hottest pants I own in the summer), but I definitely own t-shirts that are "nicer" than some collared shirts I've seen people wear. 

The history is obvious. People started wearing jackets and ties and button-down shirts. Those devolved into collared shirts. The plus-fours became khakis. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

23 hours ago, boogielicious said:

I wouldn't play golf if I had to wear a tie. :-P

... Except maybe on casual Fridays. :-)

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Not sure where the idea of the collared shirt and no jeans got started, but I know it certainly got reinforced in the late 1960s near the end of the Vietnam war. Jeans and (often) tie-died tee shirts were the warm-weather uniform of the anti-establishment hippies and counter-culture set.

Corporate America saw the country clubs and golf clubs as one of the last bastions of post-World War II respectability, so the dress codes started popping up in the early 1970s to enforce a decidedly non-hippie look. Just look at the PGA golf tour. Pros who sported mustaches or goatees caused quite a stir during that time among the button-down protectors of civilization. (History note: Hippies often wore mustaches and beards, hence the horror over facial hair on the pro.)   I quit caddying regularly about 1974, so I was gone from the country club scene for a long time, and missed out on the full development of the modern dress code.

I just know I was surprised when I started connecting with country clubs or the semi-private clubs in the 1990s. The dress codes of collared shirts and no jeans were supplemented with no frayed or slashed clothing (those Goth golfers ruin everything!). I chuckled, wondering how the dress code would be enforced on the old semi-retired millionaires I caddied for in the late 1960s. These guys teed off wearing beat-up khaki slacks, a torn golf shirt and a stained fishing hat - more like they were going to work in the garden rather than try to impress the clubhouse patio crowd as they strolled up the 18th fairway. I always wondered how the starter would tell a rumpled gent with $500,000 in his home office safe to go back to the locker room and change clothes.

Also, there's the issue of cargo pants and cargo shorts. Three years ago, I played in the St. Louis area Olympics (just local sports) golf tournament. About half of us golfers wore cargo shorts. I asked a couple of country clubbers in the field if their club had a rule against cargo stuff. They said yes, but it was a rule that needed to be changed.

I especially would like to wear cargo slacks or shorts when I volunteer at golf tournaments. Expandable pockets can hold the rules guide, a snack bar, and a small water bottle, thus leaving my hands free. Since the Boston Marathon bombings, the gate crews at golf tournaments and other public sporting events are really touchy about letting people bring in backpacks. So, allowing cargo attire would lessen the need for backpacks among volunteers.

On a more positive note, the modern tennis-polo-golf shirt was developed by France's Rene Lacoste, the tennis Grand Slam master from the 1920s. He found the old, long-sleeve tennis shirts uncomfortable, so he invented what became the Tennis-Polo-Golf shirt.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

6 hours ago, WUTiger said:

Not sure where the idea of the collared shirt and no jeans got started, but I know it certainly got reinforced in the late 1960s near the end of the Vietnam war. Jeans and (often) tie-died tee shirts were the warm-weather uniform of the anti-establishment hippies and counter-culture set.

Corporate America saw the country clubs and golf clubs as one of the last bastions of post-World War II respectability, so the dress codes started popping up in the early 1970s to enforce a decidedly non-hippie look. Just look at the PGA golf tour. Pros who sported mustaches or goatees caused quite a stir during that time among the button-down protectors of civilization. (History note: Hippies often wore mustaches and beards, hence the horror over facial hair on the pro.)   I quit caddying regularly about 1974, so I was gone from the country club scene for a long time, and missed out on the full development of the modern dress code.

I just know I was surprised when I started connecting with country clubs or the semi-private clubs in the 1990s. The dress codes of collared shirts and no jeans were supplemented with no frayed or slashed clothing (those Goth golfers ruin everything!). I chuckled, wondering how the dress code would be enforced on the old semi-retired millionaires I caddied for in the late 1960s. These guys teed off wearing beat-up khaki slacks, a torn golf shirt and a stained fishing hat - more like they were going to work in the garden rather than try to impress the clubhouse patio crowd as they strolled up the 18th fairway. I always wondered how the starter would tell a rumpled gent with $500,000 in his home office safe to go back to the locker room and change clothes.

Also, there's the issue of cargo pants and cargo shorts. Three years ago, I played in the St. Louis area Olympics (just local sports) golf tournament. About half of us golfers wore cargo shorts. I asked a couple of country clubbers in the field if their club had a rule against cargo stuff. They said yes, but it was a rule that needed to be changed.

I especially would like to wear cargo slacks or shorts when I volunteer at golf tournaments. Expandable pockets can hold the rules guide, a snack bar, and a small water bottle, thus leaving my hands free. Since the Boston Marathon bombings, the gate crews at golf tournaments and other public sporting events are really touchy about letting people bring in backpacks. So, allowing cargo attire would lessen the need for backpacks among volunteers.

On a more positive note, the modern tennis-polo-golf shirt was developed by France's Rene Lacoste, the tennis Grand Slam master from the 1920s. He found the old, long-sleeve tennis shirts uncomfortable, so he invented what became the Tennis-Polo-Golf shirt.

Excellent information. I didn't know about LaCoste. I remember their logos having the alligator. Very interesting about the post-Vietnam era dress code. That was about the time that I more identified with the hippie culture back at that time (ha).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

I don't find a collared golf shirt any less comfortable than a t-shirt, the same goes for Bermuda shorts versus cargo shorts.  I actually find golf pants more comfortable in the warmer weather than jeans so I guess I never had an issue with the golfers dress code.

If we had to wear a tie and jacket then I'd agree it was over the top but if  you're uncomfortable in a collared golf shirt you're probably buying the wrong golf shirts.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

On 1/1/2016 at 5:52 PM, jamo said:

The history is obvious. People started wearing jackets and ties and button-down shirts. Those devolved into collared shirts. The plus-fours became khakis. 

Right it has to do with the history of the game and that it's a "gentlemen's game".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Actually, those plus fours and jackets were hunting attire that men also starting wearing for golf.  The bloused slacks helped avoid getting snagged in brambles as they walked through the meadows after ducks and fowl.  It was natural to start wearing them for another outdoor sport.

Back in those days, there were no collared shirts either.  The collars were attached separately, not part of the shirt at all.  This is the big problem that I have when guys say that they are respecting the game's history by wearing slacks and a polo.  If they were truly doing what they say, they'd be wearing the coat and tie.  But while they can justify not wearing such uncomfortable attire (and I agree), they often can't seem to understand that others can just as logically justify wearing a t-shirt, or, God forbid, blue jeans.  

When I lived in Montana and went hunting, that was what most everyone I knew wore in the field on warmer late summer or early autumn days, so why is it that such hunting attire is frowned on, when such a carry over goes right to the roots and traditions of the modern game?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

I remember playing golf my first year in late November or so, maybe December, and it was a really cold day. High 30s at noon. Normally I'd wear one of my (now numerous) golf polos and shorts, but as the weather got colder I switched to workout gear like swishy pants and thermal fleeces. The starter comes up to us and breaks our balls about dressing nicely and how other courses would take your greens fees and then make you buy clothes at the pro shop once the starter sent you back. I politely told the guy to shove it because a) it's a public course that I've since learned has no dress code b) it's friggen freezing and there's like 30 people on the course c) who cares? I wasn't wearing a wifebeater and cutoff jean shorts, I looked like I was playing sports in the winter.

I haven't seen that guy working there anymore, and that course is generally my favorite now that it was taken over by a new management company (one that now does stuff like foot golf and fun outings). A good microcosm of how to and how not to thrive in the golf business.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

On 1/2/2016 at 9:40 AM, Fourputt said:

Back in those days, there were no collared shirts either.  The collars were attached separately, not part of the shirt at all.  This is the big problem that I have when guys say that they are respecting the game's history by wearing slacks and a polo.  If they were truly doing what they say, they'd be wearing the coat and tie.  But while they can justify not wearing such uncomfortable attire (and I agree), they often can't seem to understand that others can just as logically justify wearing a t-shirt, or, God forbid, blue jeans.  

 

Spot on.  If someone REALLY wants to honor the history and traditions of the game they should be wearing the typical attire of medieval Scottish shepherds.  Anything else is just enshrining their own cultural preferences as somehow the divinely appointed standard.

And for all the talk about golf being a "gentlemen's" game, the earliest players may never have even MET a gentleman in person, let alone see one play.  And that was back when the term gentleman had an actual meaning.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Around where I am - East Midlands, UK, most public courses generally have no dress code. A lot of the 9 hole courses have a relaxed or no dress code, pitch and putt courses usually have no dress code, whereas the 18 hole courses usually do.

Some clubs have 9 and 18 hole courses, the 9 hole is usually more relaxed.

There is a course that has 18, 9 and a pitch and putt. Only the 18 holes has a dress code. However, a few weeks ago, I was playing the pitch and putt, and was asked if I had anything to 'cover up' my t-shirt. Being the laid back, amenable sort of chap I am I said I'd slip a golf polo over it. Different member of staff was on when I returned to the club house for a coffee, and I asked when the dress code was extended all the way down to the pitch and putt. They said it hadn't been and were utterly perplexed when I recanted my story to them.

 

No matter where I'm playing I always have a spare golf polo in the car just in case someone changes the dress code on me, am in trousers anyway, and the weather here makes golf shoes a necessity anyway.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

30 minutes ago, x3nt0n said:

... No matter where I'm playing I always have a spare golf polo in the car just in case someone changes the dress code on me, am in trousers anyway, and the weather here makes golf shoes a necessity anyway. ...

The dress code has gotten to be big business. A private club I played at, and a couple of upscale semi-privates, will have table of khaki slacks off to the side of the pro shop. They sell these to drop-ins who have on blue jeans or warm-up pants.

For the USA, golfers often keep a little bag with a golf polo shirt and khaki slacks in the trunk alongside their golf clubs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

I am very new to this game and have a rather analytical outlook to life. From a purely logical (tongue in cheek) viewpoint, I have wondered why the style preferences of someone in an office who will never golf with me should be so concerned about whether my shirt has a collar or not.

And, why should other people who happen to see me briefly on the course, and who I will never speak to or see again for the rest of my life, require me to not wear slacks of a certain color or weave style. Why is their preference for not seeing cotton slacks in a denim weave pattern more important than my comfort while playing?

This makes as much sense to me as me requiring all other golfers whom I have never seen before and will never see again that they should not wear red colored shirts or dark colored baseball hats. What right do I have to enforce my arbitrary self important style preferences upon total strangers?

What business is it of any other golfer what I wear as long it is it not indecent or morally offensive? It is only their imagination that what I am wearing is distracting to them. They could simply choose to ignore what I wear as easily as I choose to not care what they wear.

Or they could choose to see the person underneath the clothes and value them as an equal human being as I try to do with them. (Except when they get angry at me because I am not dressed as expensively as they are. lol)

But then again, private golf courses can enforce any rules they want because it is their land after all, and if they want to require their players to spend at least $100 on their golf outfit, that is their prerogative.

(Don't take this too seriously. It is just a thought.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Note: This thread is 1297 days old. We appreciate that you found this thread instead of starting a new one, but if you plan to post here please make sure it's still relevant. If not, please start a new topic. Thank you!

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Welcome to TST! Signing up is free, and you'll see fewer ads and can talk with fellow golf enthusiasts! By using TST, you agree to our Terms of Use, our Privacy Policy, and our Guidelines.

The popup will be closed in 10 seconds...