Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
deekay

Pro chipping

Note: This thread is 1382 days old. We appreciate that you found this thread instead of starting a new one, but if you plan to post here please make sure it's still relevant. If not, please start a new topic. Thank you!

13 posts / 1434 viewsLast Reply

Recommended Posts

Hi all,

I am interested to know why it is that when I watch the pros play a greenside chip (not a pitch, from further out) they almost always seem to play the ball waaay back in their stance, sometimes even outside their back foot. This seems contrary to a lot of advice seen on this and other sites.

Surely even highly skilled pros would want to play a shot with (supposedly) a higher margin for error, using the bounce?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Register for free today and you won't see this ad spot again!

By definition here chips use the leading edge. Pitches use more bounce.

I'm not sure the camera angles are directly square. Turning your feet forward can be deceptive too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

27 minutes ago, deekay said:

Hi all,

I am interested to know why it is that when I watch the pros play a greenside chip (not a pitch, from further out) they almost always seem to play the ball waaay back in their stance, sometimes even outside their back foot. This seems contrary to a lot of advice seen on this and other sites.

Surely even highly skilled pros would want to play a shot with (supposedly) a higher margin for error, using the bounce?

I think it has to do with the skill level of the pro golfers.   I see lots of times the pros hit down on their chip shots and sort of stick the club in the ground with very little follow through.  This requires a very precise strike on the ball with very little margin for error.  Most amateur golfers are better off not trying that.   But that's just my opinion.   I may be wrong.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

12 minutes ago, iacas said:

By definition here chips use the leading edge. Pitches use more bounce.

I'm not sure the camera angles are directly square. Turning your feet forward can be deceptive too.

I think this is the main reason you see it like that.

If you watch them hitting shots when they warm up most of the balls and divots are around the middle with some deviation. 

 

Phil is the only player I've seen so far out it that far back, and even this picture is messing with you because his stance is open so it's more around where his heel is in a normal stance.

 

 

image.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Compared to pitches, chips are tad bit more descending with less loft (to ensure leading edge strike without as much bounce interference, flatter trajectory, check spin and stance wise before bottom of the swing). Also, back of stance is correct but remember it is only very slightly back, it is a very narrow stance to begin with, so center/forward/backward of stance is not the same kind of difference that you would see in fuller swings. Phil's pic above is on an uphill slope so not a good representative of a flatter slope set up.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Might also be because their teaching pros teach the ball ball back more so, than for normal full swings. I know Harmon teaches the ball back. It's not as far back as the picts make it out to be. Most have the ball in the center of the stance. This would show up better if they were standing square to the ball. Once they open their stance, it all looks different. Try that at home. 

I am thinking that the lie of the ball dictates where the ball should be in the stance. Some chips require a steeper angle into the ball. Moving the ball back accordingly helps with better ball first contact. (fewer fatties)

Myself I set up square to the ball, after aiming my club face.The ball is pretty much in the center. I don't open my stance much if at all, since I use a putting stance, and stroke. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

If the grain is into the clubface, they would play it a bit further back to make a cleaner hit.  We have a lot of grain here in Florida and if you don't catch the ball first when the grain is growing into you, chunk city.  Uphill lies (like around greens) tend to have a lot of in grain shots.

Plus, the pros play what they've found to be most successful and they practice it a LOT.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, deekay said:

Hi all,

I am interested to know why it is that when I watch the pros play a greenside chip (not a pitch, from further out) they almost always seem to play the ball waaay back in their stance, sometimes even outside their back foot. This seems contrary to a lot of advice seen on this and other sites.

Surely even highly skilled pros would want to play a shot with (supposedly) a higher margin for error, using the bounce?

I'm no expert by far, but chips as have been stated (by many here) are low lofted (and I do get a lot of practice in my short game).  You want the ball way back in your stance.  Use a pitch when you have go up and over something.  Use a chip when there are no hazards between you and the green, AND you have a 1 part rough to a 2 part green ratio.  That is 1/3 (or less) of rough to travel over and 2/3 or more green.  I don't like to use them on a downhill, where the green is sloping away from me as the ball may roll off the green.  When the ratio is wrong, experience has shown that the ball will slow down way too much before reaching the green.  Another difference is that the chip swing looks like a putt swing with zero lower body movement (just the arms), while the pitch involves the lower body sway.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On February 18, 2016 at 4:30 PM, No Mulligans said:

Jim Furyk puts the ball in the middle of his stance:

 

 

 

Thanks for sharing that video. I like how Jim uses a consistent stroke and just varies the club selection to get the desired distance and roll out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

14 hours ago, boogielicious said:

More of the technique Furyk is using.

 

Worked on this today at the practice range, since my chipping was such a glaring disaster in yesterday's round. This is the perfect solution for those short fringe shots where the putter might not work due to the terrain issues. I used the 7,8 and 9 iron and noted the distances of rollout. Thanks for the reminder on this posting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

On 17/02/2016 at 9:30 PM, No Mulligans said:

Jim Furyk puts the ball in the middle of his stance:

 

 

 

Came here looking for a reminder of chipping technique - this is perfect; thank you!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Note: This thread is 1382 days old. We appreciate that you found this thread instead of starting a new one, but if you plan to post here please make sure it's still relevant. If not, please start a new topic. Thank you!

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Welcome to TST! Signing up is free, and you'll see fewer ads and can talk with fellow golf enthusiasts! By using TST, you agree to our Terms of Use, our Privacy Policy, and our Guidelines.

The popup will be closed in 10 seconds...