Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
wheelerwheeler

What's the Best Golf Ball for a High Handicapper?

Note: This thread is 1608 days old. We appreciate that you found this thread instead of starting a new one, but if you plan to post here please make sure it's still relevant. If not, please start a new topic. Thank you!

26 posts / 21043 viewsLast Reply

Recommended Posts

I've been trying to determine the correct ball I should be playing. I don't know my clubhead swing (where do I get that clocked?), but I am a high handicapper and have never shot below 90. A lot of resources I've consulted have suggested 2-piece balls are good for beginners, but I also have a hard time keeping balls from rolling off the green.

What is the common wisdom in this type of scenario? When is it time to start playing higher quality 4 piece balls? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Its not always about handicap. Im a 24 handicap and just recently switched to urethane tour balls. (Bridgestone e5). The big ?s are budget, number of lost balls per round, and technique. A tour ball wont do you any good if you lack the required skills. Holding greens requires the proper technique, mainly accelerating thru the ball and hitting down on it with your irons. You also need to be able to land it very close to the spot you pick on your approach. If you do those things on a regular basis, then its probably time to go urethane. If budget is an issue, there are used golf balls from reputable companies online. (Buy used, not refurbished). If you lose a bunch or just wanna stay the two piece route, Id suggest Nike pd soft or wilson staff fifty elite. Both 17 a dozen or less and both offer some spin and great feel. Hope this helps. Good luck!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Try a E6 Bridgestone ball. You can usually get a sleeve of 3 at most golf outlets. If this product works for you, you will probably never need, or want  a 4 piece ball. 

I have played both 4 and 5 piece balls. They were no help to my game. 

FWIW, I too have heard that 2 piece balls with lower spin rates are better for beginners. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

I've tried a bunch of differnt balls, various titliest, nike, mojo, bridgeston, taylor made, noodle, precept, maxfli, wilson, srixon and more... as far as I can tell the ball doesn't make much of a difference to a high handicapper like me.  I really doubt a 16 HI or higher is going to score differently because of the brand of ball.  With all that said I prefer soft/low compression balls but I still don't think it makes a difference.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

1 hour ago, Patch said:

 

FWIW, I too have heard that 2 piece balls with lower spin rates are better for beginners. 

They are better for distance but not for holding greens, and the OP talked about approaches rolling off of greens. You pay your money, and take your chances! You don't use rocks on rocks!

I'd like to know more about the OP. What's his, or her, age? How strong are they? How far do they really hit the ball? This would give us something to go on!

Edited by Buckeyebowman

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

I would recommend playing balls one finds.  Experiment and once one finds a ball than seems to fit one's game, use that type.

A 36 handicap is generally going to lose a few balls a round.  Purchasing new balls on a regular basis can become a bit costly.  As long as one is not teeing up a ball that has been under water or lying in the forest for 10+ years, a used ball is going to work fine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

IMO, for the money Top Flite D2+ Feel is a very nice ball.  Soft and low compression.  Dick's usually has them on sale... (2) 15 ball boxes for $25.  The Top Flite Gamer V2 is a little better, but it does cost a bit more.

For a beginner, you probably don't put enough spin on the ball so even if you were playing ProV1's they would probably roll off.

John

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

11 minutes ago, bkuehn1952 said:

I would recommend playing balls one finds.  Experiment and once one finds a ball than seems to fit one's game, use that type.

A 36 handicap is generally going to lose a few balls a round.  Purchasing new balls on a regular basis can become a bit costly.  As long as one is not teeing up a ball that has been under water or lying in the forest for 10+ years, a used ball is going to work fine.

Yup.

The "best" ball is the cheapest possible ball.  At this stage, not "holding a green" is much more a function of your skill and ball-striking, not the ball you're playing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

I'd say a cheap distance ball like the Top Flite D2 Distance would be pretty good for you, but I'd also agree with everybody else that it probably won't make much of a difference for you.

I think the right time to switch to a tour ball is when: (1) you're not losing enough balls to make it financially tough on you to buy $4 balls, and (2) you start to want spin on short game shorts. You can get a $20-$30 a dozen ball that will be plenty long and hold the green on approach shots. The difference between that range and a ball like a ProV1 is that a ProV1 will spin on pitches, half wedges, and chips.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

1 hour ago, bkuehn1952 said:

I would recommend playing balls one finds.  Experiment and once one finds a ball than seems to fit one's game, use that type.

A 36 handicap is generally going to lose a few balls a round.  Purchasing new balls on a regular basis can become a bit costly.  As long as one is not teeing up a ball that has been under water or lying in the forest for 10+ years, a used ball is going to work fine.

Came here to say this, lol.  And also . .if you need to buy some balls . .a long time ago I bought a gross of refurbished Precept Laddies.  I'm still playing them today.  They are great balls for the price (especially refurbs).  I buy a sleeve of premium balls every once in a while and I also play whatever I find.  I can't find any reason not to tee up a Laddie if I've got one in my bag . .and I've got lots, lol. 

Oh . and  plus . .you will be the only guy in your group playing a Laddie . .no confusion or need for special marking, lol. 

 

Edited by Rainmaker

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't buy new. Like @bkuehn1952 said it doesn't matter much what ball you have. My pro also tells me it doesn't really matter what ball I play. I probably won't worry much about it until I'm a sub single digit player and even then I think I'll always buy used balls. 

I play Bridgestone e5's because they're low spin, have a nice putting feel to me, are for people with my clubhead speed, and are at the right price point used. I didn't actually get fitted for a ball like some do. Just online "hype" I read. I have most emphasis on the right price point at this stage of my game but it's nice to at least be confident I don't have the WRONG ball (if there is such a thing)

Edited by jkelley9

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

30 minutes ago, jkelley9 said:

Don't buy new. Like @bkuehn1952 said it doesn't matter much what ball you have. My pro also tells me it doesn't really matter what ball I play. I probably won't worry much about it until I'm a sub single digit player and even then I think I'll always buy used balls. 

I play Bridgestone e5's because they're low spin, have a nice putting feel to me, are for people with my clubhead speed, and are at the right price point used. I didn't actually get fitted for a ball like some do. Just online "hype" I read. I have most emphasis on the right price point at this stage of my game but it's nice to at least be confident I don't have the WRONG ball (if there is such a thing)

Just curious as to whether or not you may have meant e6. The e5 you mentioned is high spin with a urethane cover. Both are great golf balls but the e5 and e6 are pretty different. It might help the op, if you were to clarify which one you chose.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

6 hours ago, stealthhwk said:

Just curious as to whether or not you may have meant e6. The e5 you mentioned is high spin with a urethane cover. Both are great golf balls but the e5 and e6 are pretty different. It might help the op, if you were to clarify which one you chose.

Interesting. I've found several of each of those, and I like the feel and performance of the e5 a lot more than the e6.

Also, the OP mentioned that he did not know his clubhead speed. He could go to any golf shop with a launch monitor and find out his clubhead speeds for his driver and 5 iron in short order. Then he could check his equipment, especially his driver shaft flex, to see if it fits him.

I also agree with playing the balls you find. Easy way to experiment. Played 27 today and found 3 ProV-1's. Nice!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

I have two recommendations.  The Nike Mojo and the Bridgestone Laddie.  Both are sold at Walmart in a box of 24 for less that $20.  I am a 9 handicapper and play the laddie.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can answer the question for you. I have experimented with quite a few, and like others have said, price is also a factor. The Bridgestone e6 ball is the straightest legal ball in the world, and as a higher handicapper this is just what you need. It is a fairly soft ball, and has a good distance. What's more you will be able to get pearl grade lake balls for about 67p each ($1) on ebay. If you don't get on with them (which you will) try Nike PD soft.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

14 hours ago, stealthhwk said:

Just curious as to whether or not you may have meant e6. The e5 you mentioned is high spin with a urethane cover. Both are great golf balls but the e5 and e6 are pretty different. It might help the op, if you were to clarify which one you chose.

Sorry, I probably used the wrong terminology. I went with the e5 because when I was playing the Nike Mojo's (surlyn cover) my ball was hitting greens and would always be within a few inches of my ball mark or on the back side of my ball mark (further my target). 

I switched to the e5 for the urethane cover and being designed for a higher flight shot with a ~98-102 mph swing speed. 

When I said spin, it is decently forgiving for sidespin on drives but has a good amount of feel (urethane) around greens and and does a good job giving a little check spin. Although to be honest it only improved by maybe a little. 

You'll notice the ball has these little inner raised pockets in some of the holes on the ball. I imagine this is what can "grab" the green a little better and provide some back spin but offer lower sidespin because it's blocking the air/wind from grabbing the ball in the air, since those raised areas are interfering. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Note: This thread is 1608 days old. We appreciate that you found this thread instead of starting a new one, but if you plan to post here please make sure it's still relevant. If not, please start a new topic. Thank you!

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Welcome to TST! Signing up is free, and you'll see fewer ads and can talk with fellow golf enthusiasts! By using TST, you agree to our Terms of Use, our Privacy Policy, and our Guidelines.

The popup will be closed in 10 seconds...