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Is score the most important thing to you? If so, you might want to rethink this game.


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Scoring  

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  1. 1. Is Score the Most Important Thing to You?



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22 minutes ago, Lihu said:

That's exactly what I was getting at in the OP. The 76 to me was a bit lucky, while the 79 was good playing and representative of what you can do on a mediocre round (which is pretty incredible in winter conditions, BTW). Obviously, you were satisfied with that score over your better playing on the 79 round.

So, I'm wondering if you should just be satisfied with the mediocre rounds that you can reproduce or if you should consider yourself a better player than your "mediocre" score? Because your handicap would reflect that better "lucky" player?

I won't suggest that anyone "should" be satisfied with one thing or the other.  My preference is simply to shoot the lowest score I can, using the "tools" I have on the course that day.  If I'm within a couple of strokes of "net par" I know I've played better than average, and it doesn't matter to me how I got there.  I can't choose to have specific facets of the game working on a given day, I have to deal with the golfer who shows up wearing my shoes, and that goofy bastard is kinda unpredictable.   

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And there's plenty of room in the sport for all of us, no matter which you prefer  

I'm coming from this from a perspective where I typically score okay. And when I try to score well I can do a pretty good job of doing that. The other things - being outside, enjoying the company

I don't understand the point of playing a game and not keep score. The better you play the better you will score. W/O scoring how can a person tell if they are improving? It is part of the game, perio

I don't understand the point of playing a game and not keep score. The better you play the better you will score. W/O scoring how can a person tell if they are improving? It is part of the game, period. 

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2 minutes ago, parman said:

I don't understand the point of playing a game and not keep score. The better you play the better you will score. W/O scoring how can a person tell if they are improving? It is part of the game, period. 

I'd even go so far as to say it IS the game, period.  To me... if you're not playing for a score, you're practicing.  Nothing more.  Nothing less.  

The 19th hole is full of 'I would have shot a 77 if it wasn't for the triple on 9, and the doubles on 12, 16 and 17' type of stories.  You didn't ALMOST shoot a 77.  You shot an 86.  

Hell... I've shot 72 every time I've ever played 18 holes.  I just haven't stopped there.  

CY

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10 minutes ago, Fairway_CY said:

True enough... but I'd rather post a bunch of 11.3 differentials and a few 9.4 differentials than post a bunch of 17.8 differentials and a handful of 12.6 differentials.  

Consistency is what's going to ultimately drive my scores down.  That's what's changed in my game so drastically in the last year is being consistent with keeping the ball out of trouble.  Early last year, I was averaging 4-5 penalties for 7-10 strokes each round.  Right now, I average 1-2 penalties for 2-3 strokes per round which is a BIG difference in my game and my scoring.  

CY

Ah, I get what you're saying, now. I wasn't talking about consistency or anything. I was more wondering if you are happier with a lucky round that clearly doesn't represent your scoring ability, or a run of the mill rund that defines your handicap.

 

 

7 minutes ago, parman said:

I don't understand the point of playing a game and not keep score. The better you play the better you will score. W/O scoring how can a person tell if they are improving? It is part of the game, period. 

All I can say to this is "My thread title sucks." :-(

I didn't state this very clearly in the title, but the thought in the OP was are you happy with a good ball striking round with a "run-of-the-mill" score or a great outlier type of score? I didn't advocate not keeping score at all. That's something that's "not golf".

Here are the premises: "Don't worry about score"

Prior to that: "Just write it down".

The other thing I should probably add is does that great round then define your expectations to the point where you might do something "radical" in an attempt to match that score because you might be fooling yourself into thinking that's your potential?

 

7 minutes ago, DaveP043 said:

I won't suggest that anyone "should" be satisfied with one thing or the other.  My preference is simply to shoot the lowest score I can, using the "tools" I have on the course that day.  If I'm within a couple of strokes of "net par" I know I've played better than average, and it doesn't matter to me how I got there.  I can't choose to have specific facets of the game working on a given day, I have to deal with the golfer who shows up wearing my shoes, and that goofy bastard is kinda unpredictable.   

That's kind of the gist of your previous answer and I get that. Makes sense, like most things you state.

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Yes, score is the most important thing to me. It's not the only consideration, but it's the most important by a fairly wide margin. 

Now that being said, I will always attempt to look for positives in a round where the score did not meet my expectations. But I won't ever diminish a good scoring round just because I didn't hit enough greens in regulation or because I happened to hole a few longer putts than usual. 

In fact, for those that play semi-competitive golf, I think that scoring well when you don't have your best-looking game becomes a skill unto itself. Some might call it "grinding." Being able to grind out a good score actually becomes something that competitive golfers take pride in.

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Just now, Lihu said:

Ah, I get what you're saying, now. I wasn't talking about consistency or anything. I was more wondering if you are happier with a lucky round that clearly doesn't represent your scoring ability, or a run of the mill rund that defines your handicap.

That's a tougher question.  I mean... if I shot a crazy good number for me (79 or something)... I'd want to be able to say I shot the 79.  I don't know if I'd go into details about how I bounced a drive on a par 5 off the cart path to leave me 150 in or anything, but... I'd be happier to say I shot a 79 after a few good breaks than I would to say I shot an 88 where I played to my ability.  

CY

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5 minutes ago, parman said:

I don't understand the point of playing a game and not keep score.

I find immense enjoyment in the mere act of playing the game.  I think that partly comes from the fact that I play lots of games: golf, pool, darts, board games, card games, video games... At some point it became less about the results and more about enjoying the challenge.  Once that happened, scores became irrelevant.

I also suck at golf so I better not pin my enjoyment on a score. ;-)  That's not to say I don't use Game Golf when I play but the enjoyment and satisfaction I get from playing is completely independent from the final score.

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3 minutes ago, Big C said:

In fact, for those that play semi-competitive golf, I think that scoring well when you don't have your best-looking game becomes a skill unto itself. Some might call it "grinding." Being able to grind out a good score actually becomes something that competitive golfers take pride in.

I often wondered what "grinding" means. I've heard it before, but never got the exact meaning. Thanks.

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2 minutes ago, Lihu said:

The other thing I should probably add is does that great round then define your expectations to the point where you might do something "radical" in an attempt to match that score because you might be fooling yourself into thinking that's your potential?

I'd say that a really good score DOES indicate your potential.  But whenever the word "potential" comes up, we end up looking at handicap as a "measure of potential", and your handicap is based on half of your most recent scores, not the single best score.  Now that I think about it, this digression into "potential" is somewhat :offtopic:, so I won't go any further into that particular wormhole right now.

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I guess at the end of the day, I'll remember my score, but what really sticks out in my memory is those specific shots that went exactly as visualized (I'm more jazzed to enter a post in the 'best shot of the week' thread than I am in the "What did you shoot" thread).  Only the REALLY good rounds is that flipped, but again, even for those its about the shots, maybe in a great game the entire category of shots, in which case I usually go on about "hitting amost all the fairways" or "best GIR ever" than the actual score itself.

I think about the performance metrics which are a more direct output metric, rather than the total score (a summary or indirect output metric).

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5 minutes ago, Big C said:

In fact, for those that play semi-competitive golf, I think that scoring well when you don't have your best-looking game becomes a skill unto itself. Some might call it "grinding." Being able to grind out a good score actually becomes something that competitive golfers take pride in.

I certainly take some solace in being able to grind out an average score, but... I'd still prefer the great day.  I shot a 93 on Saturday during a tournament round that FELT like it was going to be somewhere around 105.  I just didn't have it that day.  To come in and realize that it wasn't nearly as bad as I thought was a nice feeling.  Still... I finished 7 strokes behind the winner and 5 strokes out of the money.  

I didn't have my swing OR luck that day.  I had to grind it out start to finish.  I would have preferred to have my tee shot on my 4th hole bounce forward off the top of the mound and not backwards into a bunker.... or have my tee shot on my 6th hole kick just a little left off the cart path instead of to the right and into a lie where all I could do was flick my wrist to advance it down into the fairway.  Instead... I struggled on those holes.

CY

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I think all players who play this great game, want to score their best.
They reach various levels, sometimes over the years they improve and sometimes get sidetracked with the many faults or habits
which tend to make it more difficult.

A player could play their best and lose and a player could play less than their best and win.
Improving to the next level is hard and not often achieved.

I feel I have always had the potential like everyone else and that is the drive to score our best.
To me a great score may be a personal best and I like to think I will hopefully lower that number each and every time I play.
 

 

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1 minute ago, rehmwa said:

I guess at the end of the day, I'll remember my score, but what really sticks out in my memory is those specific shots that went exactly as visualized (I'm more jazzed to enter a post in the 'best shot of the week' thread than I am in the "What did you shoot" thread).  Only the REALLY good rounds is that flipped, but again, even for those its about the shots, maybe in a great game the entire category of shots, in which case I usually go on about "hitting amost all the fairways" or "best GIR ever" than the actual score itself.

I think about the performance metrics which are a more direct output metric, rather than the total score (a summary or indirect output metric).

Game Golf does both of these things for you, whether you agree with it or not! :-D

 

Just now, Fairway_CY said:

I certainly take some solace in being able to grind out an average score, but... I'd still prefer the great day.  I shot a 93 on Saturday during a tournament round that FELT like it was going to be somewhere around 105.  I just didn't have it that day.  To come in and realize that it wasn't nearly as bad as I thought was a nice feeling.  Still... I finished 7 strokes behind the winner and 5 strokes out of the money.  

Yeah, same here. "Don't worry about the score", "Just write it down".

 

Just now, Fairway_CY said:

I didn't have my swing OR luck that day.  I had to grind it out start to finish.  I would have preferred to have my tee shot on my 4th hole bounce forward off the top of the mound and not backwards into a bunker.... or have my tee shot on my 6th hole kick just a little left off the cart path instead of to the right and into a lie where all I could do was flick my wrist to advance it down into the fairway.  Instead... I struggled on those holes.

CY

I hate days like these too. In fact, I hate watching other people going through this as well. . . :-(

 

 

As most of you probably suspect, I prefer to shoot a mediocre round with no really lucky shots to a lucky one where I make a birdie from a bunker out and many more things like that. It feels wrong to even post a score like that.

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1 minute ago, Lihu said:

As most of you probably suspect, I prefer to shoot a mediocre round with no really lucky shots to a lucky one where I make a birdie from a bunker out and many more things like that. It feels wrong to even post a score like that.

And there's plenty of room in the sport for all of us, no matter which you prefer  :beer:

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IMO it all depends on your skill level. 

To me if you are shooting over 100 then the score should not matter. Because at that skill level "if" you are trying to improve, the focus should be in making a good swing using fundamentals, grip, alignment, tempo, ball positioning and such. Making every swing the best swing you can put on the ball. 

Does it really make a difference if you shoot 100 or 112?...I don't think it really does. At that point, is just about trying to have fun, get some exercise and try to implement what you worked on the range. It is more relaxing, more enjoyable and probably you swing better. 

Now if you are either competing, have a realistic expectation of breaking 90 or 80 it absolutely matters.

when I am shooting in the nineties and if during a round I cross to the 100 mark, I no longer keep score. The score no longer matters. I do still stay focus on making good swings and work on my mechanics. 

 

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14 minutes ago, Club Rat said:

I think all players who play this great game, want to score their best.
They reach various levels, sometimes over the years they improve and sometimes get sidetracked with the many faults or habits
which tend to make it more difficult.

A player could play their best and lose and a player could play less than their best and win.
Improving to the next level is hard and not often achieved.

I feel I have always had the potential like everyone else and that is the drive to score our best.
To me a great score may be a personal best and I like to think I will hopefully lower that number each and every time I play.
 

 

"I feel I have always had the potential like everyone else and that is the drive to score our best.
To me a great score may be a personal best and I like to think I will hopefully lower that number each and every time I play."

It has been said that "potential is one of the greatest burdens in one's life." I think the vast majority of golfers,  for whatever reason, fail to meet their golfing potential. I know I didn't because of time constraints. 
 

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So, I read this post about the book "Golf in the Kingdom", and it kind of made me think about the topic of score.

"Donna worry about the score so much, it’s not the important thing"

It's curious - to place the quote in context, Shivas Irons is fastidious about the proper recording of the score (Murphy's "waggle" that knocks the ball off the tee with his driver costs him a shot) - even though they are only playing a practice round, but he acknowledges that the score is not the important thing.

A few years back I was having the round (for me) of my life. -1 for the round as I hit my tee shot on the 12th hole, whereupon I promptly took a 14. Recording the 14 for that hole felt a lot better than "pick up and take the snowman" (which my buddies encouraged).

Played OK on the remaining holes, finished the right side of my handicap for the round. A beautiful spring day, hit some great shots...that's what's golf is all about, isn't it?

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37 minutes ago, Lihu said:

Exactly, wouldn't you consider that a gimmick to make yourself feel better about the round that otherwise was probably not too good?

Oh certainly gimmick away. As I matter of fact I insist everybody does. Too many folks quit from frustration of how hard the game is.

Mine has simply evolved to that being primarily score focus.

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