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How to Perform a Golf Swing Like a PGA Tour Golfer


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Wow.  On purpose, or did you lose a bet?!  

In video 2,  what are your thoughts on the 2 lasers on a pole he has made?  It seems its a very good way to determine if you are on plane (which I am now).      BWT,  tonight is my first gol

Seeing a video helped me to see what I was doing wrong.  Started swinging a club with a sock under my right arm.  Wasn't that hard.  I'm a visual person,  I had to see it on video to understand it. 

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I think his distinction between swinging and hitting is quite blurry now. Dr Mann started with a definite no-go with regards mixing hitting and swinging but then he has slowly introduced options. Plus he has revised some of his original comments.

example:

1. You must not cock your right wrist 

Then 

It is quite permissible to allow a natural cocking of  your right wrist,  especially if the arms are moving up a steeper plane than the shoulder plane.

2. You must keep your flying wedges intact.

Then

It is quite acceptable to palmer flex (bow)  your left wrist for stability purposes ( which breaks that intact flying wedge because it moves the clubshaft  to a shallower plane than if one hadn't palmer flexed)

3. The left arm is inert and is blasted away from the chest by the active pivot action

Then

I believe that the lead shoulder girdle muscles can be used to help release PA4

4. You must not use any hittting action with the right arm 

Then

The right arm can be used to synergistically assist the release of PA4  , PA2 and PA3  as long as it doesn't become a dominant factor which would be a 'Hitting' motion. So this means there can be some hit in the swinging motion but within limits (now that is quite a blurry definition). Its like experiment with your swing and find the right amount of swing and hit that doesn't cause timing problems with your swing ( so how does one figure this one out for each and every swing one does on the golf course- each swing will be slightly different depending on your intent?).

5. He talks about a pitch elbow position (in front of the right hip) for swinging while punch elbow  (more to the right side) for hitting but there is no mention about how this can be achieved with people who have different upper vs lower arm measurements and differing elbow movements. For example, I cannot pitch my elbow over my right hip by letting it lead in front of the hands , without having to do a major secondary tilt (head over my right foot).

6. Weight Shift - Apparently your COG position is retained up to impact but there are varying COP's depending on the individual golfer (ie. Bubba and others have less COP on their lead leg - rear foot golfers , while many others have significantly more COP on their front foot - front foot golfers). The theory behind this is using data from pressure plates that measure vertical forces but his explanation using ratios of body mass left or right of the COG line (from a face-one view) doesn't make sense. If your COG is in a constant position , then shouldn't there be equal body mass  ratios around the central vertical axis through that COG position?  When people talk about PRESSURE ,, then isn't that 'FORCE PER UNIT AREA' ? So a high COP doesn't necessarily mean there is more 'mass weight' over that area . It could actually mean the same 'mass weight' applied over a smaller area (ie. maybe on a smaller area of foot contacting the ground). 

7. There is no mention of swing anchor positions and their relevant importance during address/setup.  For example, when I try and hit balls using the front 'one leg drill'  method - I cannot follow-through and fall backwards to keep balance. When I try and hit balls using the rear 'one leg drill'  method I am perfectly in balance. With feet together drill I can also just about keep in balance but I do feel more pressure on my rear leg into impact.

This sort of proves that I my COG favours pivoting more towards my rear hip and I should set up at address to meet my biomechanical pattern. None of this has been mentioned by Dr Mann yet and I suspect he may have to revise all his papers and state a caveat saying that 'some' of his suggested swing instructions only applies to golfer that have specific biomechanical patterns. That if their elbows, 'hip joints' and wrist hinge movements are like 'this' or 'that' , then 'this' or 'that' specific instruction applies. That should take another 10 years to fully document and analyse by which time my knees, back and hips will be shot to pieces.:-)

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10 hours ago, DownAndOut said:

I think his distinction between swinging and hitting is quite blurry now.

There isn't really one. Hitters and swingers use the same muscles in the same order. They can use the same procedures and inter-mix them a bit too. "Swingers" can use weak grips, strong grips, etc. They can have short backswings, lots of lag, or long backswings that unload the lag gradually.

10 hours ago, DownAndOut said:

6. Weight Shift - Apparently your COG position is retained up to impact but there are varying COP's depending on the individual golfer (ie. Bubba and others have less COP on their lead leg - rear foot golfers , while many others have significantly more COP on their front foot - front foot golfers). The theory behind this is using data from pressure plates that measure vertical forces but his explanation using ratios of body mass left or right of the COG line (from a face-one view) doesn't make sense. If your COG is in a constant position , then shouldn't there be equal body mass  ratios around the central vertical axis through that COG position?  When people talk about PRESSURE ,, then isn't that 'FORCE PER UNIT AREA' ? So a high COP doesn't necessarily mean there is more 'mass weight' over that area . It could actually mean the same 'mass weight' applied over a smaller area (ie. maybe on a smaller area of foot contacting the ground). 

You won't find many who understand the actual science behind this more than me.

And yes, when people say "pressure" they really mean the sum of all those square inches. They mean total force under your left or right foot.

10 hours ago, DownAndOut said:

7. There is no mention of swing anchor positions and their relevant importance during address/setup.  For example, when I try and hit balls using the front 'one leg drill'  method - I cannot follow-through and fall backwards to keep balance. When I try and hit balls using the rear 'one leg drill'  method I am perfectly in balance. With feet together drill I can also just about keep in balance but I do feel more pressure on my rear leg into impact.

You shouldn't.

10 hours ago, DownAndOut said:

This sort of proves that I my COG favours pivoting more towards my rear hip and I should set up at address to meet my biomechanical pattern. None of this has been mentioned by Dr Mann yet and I suspect he may have to revise all his papers and state a caveat saying that 'some' of his suggested swing instructions only applies to golfer that have specific biomechanical patterns. That if their elbows, 'hip joints' and wrist hinge movements are like 'this' or 'that' , then 'this' or 'that' specific instruction applies. That should take another 10 years to fully document and analyse by which time my knees, back and hips will be shot to pieces.:-)

You also shouldn't really do that much either. Bubba is as forward as anyone with an iron off the ground. Drivers are a different story. But they can be, because they're teed up.

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I think I now understand where I'm going wrong with COP variances while COG stable. We have moving masses where the COG is stable , but to slow/stop those masses rotating around that COG , one needs to use the legs to brace and slow them down. To do that brace, one needs to push into the ground (to create bracing shear forces). Therefore , even though the ratios of mass around the COG axis are approximately the same, there can be more vertical force pushing between legs/feet and ground and therefore higher COP values. For some reason , that bit of physics has eluded me until now  (I seem to have forgotten that humans have muscles and can jump :cry:)

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29 minutes ago, DownAndOut said:

I think I now understand where I'm going wrong with COP variances while COG stable. We have moving masses where the COG is stable , but to slow/stop those masses rotating around that COG , one needs to use the legs to brace and slow them down. To do that brace, one needs to push into the ground (to create bracing shear forces). Therefore , even though the ratios of mass around the COG axis are approximately the same, there can be more vertical force pushing between legs/feet and ground and therefore higher COP values. For some reason , that bit of physics has eluded me until now  (I seem to have forgotten that humans have muscles and can jump :cry:)

The slowing down doesn't come from bracing quite like you seem to be suggesting.

The lead foot is not increasing its pressure or force because it's bracing. It's increasing its pressure and force because a) the weight is shifting that way too, but way more so b) the front leg is extending, which pushes into the ground, raises the belt level, etc.

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