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Valleygolfer

Left foot coming off the ground for extra power

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1 hour ago, mdl said:

Yes, but note really jumping back away from the ball.  Sort of a combo pushing off the ground along with the rotation that drives the front hip back and up.

That look of the head/body going backwards, the stalling of the hips, I think most of that is because there is so much speed of the arms going through the ball, the body has to absorb it somewhere.

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8 hours ago, Valleygolfer said:

Yes, the same as Bubba. I only feel like this will work if it is not forced. I am fairly athletic and can often emulate things reasonably well so I am going to give it a go. It has to be coordinated to work though and I can't get crossed up during the movement.

From what I've seen Bubba kind of "stands up" on the balls of his feet as he comes into impact. I've seen videos of other Tour players who "spin" on their left heel, turning the toe of the left foot out toward the target. Fowler's left foot "hop" seems to accomplish the same thing.

I think any movement of the left foot like that should be a result of the swing and not looked at as a cause of any particular swing motion. If it happens it happens, if it doesn't it doesn't.

God knows if I went after a ball that hard I'd put myself in the hospital!

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When I first read this, my thoughts were it would be practically impossible to lift the lead foot during impact without losing your balance or falling back. A lot of players will roll onto the outside of the lead foot however. Also I find that if a player is good at thrusting the lead hip upwards after impact that often times, the left heel will lift up in addition to the rolling. Again, this is a result of the swing, not a deliberate action. Someone with a better explanation of GFR could provide more accurate analysis than I.

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Interesting thread.  My first thought was tennis players who get airborne when they are trying to crush a forehand.  I can't say the mechanics are the same but maybe the principle.

Rather than just a jump but more of a pushing forward and up for more leverage and a quicker turn.  Not sure, but it would be interesting to see if there is anything quantitative about the move.  Similar to the sports science episode with Padraig Harrington and the Happy Gilmore swing.

John

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I have the blast golf sensor and I think it will measure swing speed (have not had much of a chance to use it). I plan on playing indoor golf Thursday and will see if I can achieve any changes.

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Because of age and hip injury, lifting the heel on the back swing  helps me have a better turn. Hence, more power. But at first I had to consciously do it. And I had to slow the takeaway which was good. I am a believer. -Marv

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12 hours ago, MarvChamp said:

Because of age and hip injury, lifting the heel on the back swing  helps me have a better turn. Hence, more power. But at first I had to consciously do it. And I had to slow the takeaway which was good. I am a believer. -Marv

That is not what I am talking about here, Marv. More of a result of momentum after impact.

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18 hours ago, nevets88 said:

That look of the head/body going backwards, the stalling of the hips, I think most of that is because there is so much speed of the arms going through the ball, the body has to absorb it somewhere.

That seems backwards to me.  You're driving forward and up and out and rotating to power the arms, and get them out of the way to allow a good in plane swing with a good face path and angle around impact.  The drive and rotation is powering the arms – note I'm note arguing about passive arms or the like, just the original source of the power – not the other way around.

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On 2/27/2017 at 8:20 PM, Valleygolfer said:

I am considering trying to incorporate this in the simulator to see if I can produce some extra power.

There are probably better ways you can create more speed. You're looking at an intricate piece that by itself doesn't have anything to do with creating speed.

The foot lift thing is a result of other things occurring. In other words do the things they are doing to allows this to occur.

What it illustrates, especially with more guys hitting up on the driver, is that they aren't "loaded" into their lead left/foot at impact. The vertical ground force being applied is shooting up and back towards their trail side real fast, again we're talking about driver.

Justin Thomas keeps the foot down with an iron.

I disagree that Rory and Rickie have their lead foot come off the ground at impact. 

 

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2 minutes ago, mvmac said:

There are probably better ways you can create more speed. You're looking at an intricate piece that by itself doesn't have anything to do with creating speed.

The foot lift thing is a result of other things occurring. In other words do the things they are doing to allows this to occur.

What it illustrates, especially with more guys hitting up on the driver, is that they aren't "loaded" into their lead left/foot at impact. The vertical ground force being applied is shooting up and back towards their trail side real fast, again we're talking about driver.

Justin Thomas keeps the foot down with an iron.

I disagree that Rory and Rickie have their lead foot come off the ground at impact. 

 

I agree that it (lifting) is a part of other actions however Rory's foot does come up in the swing you posted. It would not have rotated like it did if all his weight stayed loaded on it. The forward and upward momentum of the aggressive shoulder turn brings his foot up.

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From what I see, all three of the last videos show weight being transferred to the outer edge of the lead foot. The foot is still in contact with the ground except perhaps the toe lifting slightly. It is a rolling action, not a lifting action.

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2 minutes ago, Valleygolfer said:

I agree that it (lifting) is a part of other actions however Rory's foot does come up in the swing you posted. It would not have rotated like it did if all his weight stayed loaded on it. The forward and upward momentum of the aggressive shoulder turn brings his foot up.

Coming off the ground and rotating are two different things. Like I said in my post, I agree that "not all his weight" is forward at impact.

Rory's foot isn't coming off the ground at impact.

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Screen Shot 2017-03-01 at 9.56.22 AM.pngScreen Shot 2017-03-01 at 9.56.58 AM.png

Here's how I see it and you can do whatever you want. You're a 10 handicap that most likely already struggles with consistent contact and you're talking about adding another layer like having your front foot come off the ground at impact.

The best way to create more speed would be to work on hitting it more solid. You could also look at getting some SuperSpeed golf training aids, it's worked for me and other players I know.

So if you still want to lift the foot you have to have the other components match. Gotta ask yourself if you are as rotated and creating the same "tilts" as Justin Thomas is at A5, 6 and 7.

Screen Shot 2017-03-01 at 10.05.29 AM.pngScreen Shot 2017-03-01 at 10.05.48 AM.png

Screen Shot 2017-03-01 at 10.07.56 AM.png

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I have a home made "speed stick" that I talked about previously. It is merely a graphite fairway wood shaft with a couple of golf balls glued onto the end. There is a sliding "birdie ball" with a foam core that is held in place by friction that is overcome as you swing. Just like the real thing, your swing determines when the sound of the birdie ball clacking into the fixed balls. It is a neat training aid for speed training, but the same thing can be achieved by simply swinging an inverted club. Using it also gives you the opportunity of actually "looking" at what the lead foot is doing during and post impact. 

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27 minutes ago, mvmac said:

Coming off the ground and rotating are two different things. Like I said in my post, I agree that "not all his weight" is forward at impact.

Rory's foot isn't coming off the ground at impact.

Screen Shot 2017-03-01 at 10.03.28 AM.png

Screen Shot 2017-03-01 at 9.56.22 AM.pngScreen Shot 2017-03-01 at 9.56.58 AM.png

Here's how I see it and you can do whatever you want. You're a 10 handicap that most likely already struggles with consistent contact and you're talking about adding another layer like having your front foot come off the ground at impact.

The best way to create more speed would be to work on hitting it more solid. You could also look at getting some SuperSpeed golf training aids, it's worked for me and other players I know.

So if you still want to lift the foot you have to have the other components match. Gotta ask yourself if you are as rotated and creating the same "tilts" as Justin Thomas is at A5, 6 and 7.

Screen Shot 2017-03-01 at 10.05.29 AM.pngScreen Shot 2017-03-01 at 10.05.48 AM.png

Screen Shot 2017-03-01 at 10.07.56 AM.png

I see you are right now on Rory. Truth be told, my impact is pretty good and if anything it the path that is more of an issue. I brought up this foot lifting because of the discussion by analysts during broadcasts. I do already understand how to generate speed but a practice aid may be able increase it. Mostly it's a concern because I am getting old and want to maintain speed.

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5 minutes ago, Valleygolfer said:

I see you are right now on Rory. Truth be told, my impact is pretty good and if anything it the path that is more of an issue. I brought up this foot lifting because of the discussion by analysts during broadcasts. I do already understand how to generate speed but a practice aid may be able increase it. Mostly it's a concern because I am getting old and want to maintain speed.

I am with you there bro...I am getting old and just want to maintain......period!

(what I used to do all night long, now takes me all night long to do - once)

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4 hours ago, Valleygolfer said:

That is not what I am talking about here, Marv. More of a result of momentum after impact.

AH! Of course! A man has a better chance at understanding if the man reads well first. Very interesting topic. Thanks, -Marv

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I did try to implement some speed in the swing the other day. I really didn't feel like I was "coming up" off the ground though. I had some fairly high ball speeds but not very far computed ball flight. It was a weird session. Mostly straight drives recorded as well but odd. It was too dark in the simulator to get the swing video to be any good.

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