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35YO Golfer's Plan: Buy a Trackman, Dedicate 7 Hours Daily, Get Good


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Hello everyone, Glad to see there was some interest in my project/experiment. I just randomly looked at this site and was wondering if I should join. Saw the title of the post and thought that so

Generally speaking… one of the problems with using a Trackman is that it's going to be easy to fall into the "well, my clubface is 2° closed right now, so let me fix that." It'll be easy to get stuck

Ignore almost anything from Jeff. He's a crotchety old guy who hates AimPoint. In one breath he'll tell you it's like cheating (i.e. it's good, and should not be allowed because of how easy it makes r

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2 hours ago, RangeGolfer said:

@iacas Just got done ordering your book. 

Nice. I think you'll enjoy it and it'll help you prioritize what you should focus on to get better.

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18 hours ago, RangeGolfer said:

I understand what you are saying, but I am just not comfortable putting at all! My current average is 36.76 putts per round (counting 28 rounds).

As long as I am not comfortable and good at doing the following:

25 in a row from 3 feet
25 in a row from 5 feet
Lag Putting
20 in a row from 20 feet stopping in a 3 foot circle
20 in a row from 30 feet stopping in a 3 foot circle
20 in a row from 45 feet stopping in a 3 foot circle

I will keep on following my hours.

If putting is so easy to learn as Isaca states in his post. I should be able to adjust my plan pretty soon, right?

If you are not a good putter, then it makes sense to focus on your putting. Just two things to think about:

  1. Sometimes bad putting is actually a result of poor ball striking. If you 3 putt from 60 feet, that can feel awful and like your putting sucks. In reality, the problem is that you were 60 feet from the hole in the first place. A lot of times people think they're bad putters but the real problem is that their ball striking needs improvement. Hopefully your stats system can point you in the right direction. If you are three putting from 30 feet, or missing more than half of your 5 footers, then definitely work on your putting.

    Also, don't get too down when you do inevitably 3 putt after having a really long first putt. Or missing a 15 foot birdie putt. You actually aren't doing that bad when it happens!
     
  2. Be careful about overestimating how good you need to be at putting. Jason Day was #1 in strokes gained putting on tour last year. He made 90% of putts from 3 to 5 feet. People think the pros are much better putters than they actually are. I don't know the average leave distance of pros from 45 feet, but I'm very sure it averages over 3 feet.
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I like data and fiddling about with the golf swing and the physics of it.  And that includes learning a lot of stuff on my own (I don't mind backtracking) - But I'm not trying to get my handicap down a big step.  If I was, I'd find a good coach to at least give me an outline to work from and periodic checkins.  (but if I was trying to establish a beach head and even a business, based on a journey of self learning - by definition - I'd do it myself no kidding).

ENJOY the journey.  Good advice from a few here and MANY members(more than any other site I've reviewed) are able to tie together the physics, data, mechanics, and feels as a continuum (so many seem to think they are separate things), I won't pile on.  Dave and Erik have really great info.  So do a lot of the regulars.  Be cautious, even here you'll see a lot of conflicting junk mixed in with the gems.  the gems are worth it.

This is a good site - look at the response already.  And you likely get a lot of followers too.

I fully expected this thread to be titled:

"Golfer Buys Trackman:  Friends Keep Showing up at Front Door at All Hours"

Edited by rehmwa
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On 4/27/2017 at 11:52 AM, DeadMan said:

If you are not a good putter, then it makes sense to focus on your putting. Just two things to think about:

  1. Sometimes bad putting is actually a result of poor ball striking. If you 3 putt from 60 feet, that can feel awful and like your putting sucks. In reality, the problem is that you were 60 feet from the hole in the first place. A lot of times people think they're bad putters but the real problem is that their ball striking needs improvement. Hopefully your stats system can point you in the right direction. If you are three putting from 30 feet, or missing more than half of your 5 footers, then definitely work on your putting.

    Also, don't get too down when you do inevitably 3 putt after having a really long first putt. Or missing a 15 foot birdie putt. You actually aren't doing that bad when it happens!
     
  2. Be careful about overestimating how good you need to be at putting. Jason Day was #1 in strokes gained putting on tour last year. He made 90% of putts from 3 to 5 feet. People think the pros are much better putters than they actually are. I don't know the average leave distance of pros from 45 feet, but I'm very sure it averages over 3 feet.
 

I agree with you. Actually getting more comfortable with my putting stroke and chipping is going pretty well. Within the last three or four weeks, the course grew some crazy rough and it took me a while to get used to it. I am already adjusting my schedule a little bit. Right now I have to focus more on my long irons and woods. I started to leave my club face open on impact and trying to work on that. 

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Study Ernest Jones.  Swing the clubhead. 

Learn it know it believe it live it.

Thats my advice which I know will be ignored.

Toe shots are drawie.  Heel shots are the fadies.

In a good swing there's little manipulation just finish with right thumb over left shoulder.

I will watch you but not post much after this.  Thanks for sharing it will provide me entertainment.  I wish you the best truly but my original prediction will stand until you prove me wrong.

Again good luck to you sir!  You are a brave soul and there's few left!:-)

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On 4/24/2017 at 1:07 PM, WUTiger said:

Someone should send a cautionary to r/golf, about practicing 7 hours a day:

At the February St. Louis Golf Expo, an orthopedic surgeon talked about overdoing the golf muscles. According to him, golfers who cross these thresholds greatly increase their chance of injury:

  • Golfers who play four or more rounds of golf a week.
  • Golfers who hit more than 200 full-swing practice shots a week.

It seems like 7 x 7 would definitely cross the thresholds.

Not only that but, at least myself, I would burn out playing/practicing 7 hours a day everyday. 

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25 minutes ago, chilepepper said:

Not only that but, at least myself, I would burn out playing/practicing 7 hours a day everyday. 

The 7 hours is a dedicated block to allow me to focus on my goals. I can only repeat myself and say that I am not rushing from one thing to another and try to hit 2000 balls a day. I have to disagree with the burnout statement. For me, that is like saying that sitting at the desk, going to meetings, answering emails and programming or something similar every day for 7 hours would burn me out. 

My schedule is flexible and I created it so I have something to start with and follow. There is also a lot of standing around and thinking involved or analyzing. For example when I am on the range. I think about my swing, what I am focusing on and execute it. Afterward, I think about how it felt, check the data, make an assessment and once I come to my conclusion I hit one again.

To be honest it is actually very relaxing and calm. I am currently probably the most relaxed I have ever been. I have been almost sitting all my life in front a screen. Allowing myself to spend 7 hours outside is amazing. Maybe that is another reason why I have so much fun right now. 

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Just wanted to throw out an idea that has become more appealing to me over the last couple years of watching people come up with putting improvement plans:

The idea is to establish a baseline set of putts that are representative of an entire round's worth of putts.  A good example of that is here in @b101's swing thread (go to the chart at the bottom of this post):

When you track your score for sinking all of those putts, you can measure yourself using strokes gained against how a typical pro would've done for those distances.  Do that once or twice a week for months and months on end, and you've got yourself a legitimate measure of where your putting stands.  And you have a good feel for where you stand relative to the gold standard in putting.

I am not a big fan of saying things like "my goal is to hit 80% from X feet" or whatever.  You get in a rhythm for hitting those putts. You should randomize your test, and make it directly comparable to what you get on the course. Just my humble opinion, and take it for what it's worth.

 

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10 minutes ago, RandallT said:

Just wanted to throw out an idea that has become more appealing to me over the last couple years of watching people come up with putting improvement plans:

The idea is to establish a baseline set of putts that are representative of an entire round's worth of putts.  A good example of that is here in @b101's swing thread (go to the chart at the bottom of this post):

When you track your score for sinking all of those putts, you can measure yourself using strokes gained against how a typical pro would've done for those distances.  Do that once or twice a week for months and months on end, and you've got yourself a legitimate measure of where your putting stands.  And you have a good feel for where you stand relative to the gold standard in putting.

I am not a big fan of saying things like "my goal is to hit 80% from X feet" or whatever.  You get in a rhythm for hitting those putts. You should randomize your test, and make it directly comparable to what you get on the course. Just my humble opinion, and take it for what it's worth.

 

If only I lived close enough to my course to do this once or twice a week! Definitely recommend using a putting mat indoors as well - rolling ten footers for five minutes every day has really helped my pace control.

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@RangeGolfer

I'm not sure if it's worth it staring at trackman numbers when you have 120 yards between right/left miss. That's a serious 2 way miss and there's probably fundamentals you should be working on without worrying about numbers.

That being said. I think what you're trying to do is very doable(the skill part) in a reasonably short amount of time if you're smart about it. I would read through some of the other threads of guys who've tried similar projects. Don't make the same mistakes they did. Personally I wouldn't waste time trying to fix the sort of things a qualified instructor can help you with in 1 session.

All the best. I hope you make it. I'll be keeping an eye on this.

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4 hours ago, Alx said:

@RangeGolfer

I'm not sure if it's worth it staring at trackman numbers when you have 120 yards between right/left miss. That's a serious 2 way miss and there's probably fundamentals you should be working on without worrying about numbers.

Sure, working on fundamentals is a good idea, but his shot zone is approximately +50/-40 yards at 280 yards average carry. Doesn't seem outrageously horrible. . .actually it seems pretty good.

driver_dispersion_carry_4-27-17.jpg

 

 

Edited by Lihu
Original wordng is too much the opposite of what I mean.
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1 minute ago, Lihu said:

Sure, working on fundamentals is a good idea, but his shot zone is approximately +50/-40 yards at 280 yards average carry. Doesn't seem outrageously horrible. . .

driver_dispersion_carry_4-27-17.jpg

 

 

 

I also want to add that due to me leaving my club face open, I also tried a few different grips and varied my swing speed. Next sessions I will try to stay consistent with one grip and feel and re-post those numbers. 

I don't agree with him on not staring at the TrackMan numbers. Why would I ignore data that is right in front of my nose telling me what happened during that specific shot? The data is the quintessential part of my process. I change something, hit the ball and check/analyze the data and go from there. Don't understand why I should ignore it?

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3 hours ago, Lihu said:

Sure, working on fundamentals is a good idea, but his shot zone is approximately +50/-40 yards at 280 yards average carry. Doesn't seem outrageously horrible. . .actually it seems pretty good

Thats 60 left and 60 right. Even at 50/40 it's still 90 yards. Atleast on the courses I play thats an unplayable dispersion.

For a midteen handicappers its probably good.

So you dont think a 90(120) yard wide shot zone is a bad inconsistency and shows that theres probably a fundamental flaw causing it?

 

3 hours ago, RangeGolfer said:

I don't agree with him on not staring at the TrackMan numbers. Why would I ignore data that is right in front of my nose telling me what happened during that specific shot? The data is the quintessential part of my process. I change something, hit the ball and check/analyze the data and go from there. Don't understand why I should ignore it?

Trackman won't show some of the things causing wild inconsistencies. Not to mention when you make swing changes you'll get off center hits. Afaik that data is going to be very incomplete on those shots.

I know I could manipulate path and face very early on even when my swing was fundamentally bad. Inconsistency was where it showed. At that point I ignored the "data" and focused on getting those fundamental changes done.

Just my 2cents.

 

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Generally speaking… one of the problems with using a Trackman is that it's going to be easy to fall into the "well, my clubface is 2° closed right now, so let me fix that." It'll be easy to get stuck in a loop of fixing whatever Trackman identifies as the biggest issue, instead of maybe taking a step back to get worse for awhile in order to implement something that'll benefit you wholesale down the road.

For example, sometimes we will work on a change with a student where they may hit hooks or big pushes for awhile, but it's the right change. It wouldn't result in the best Trackman numbers at all (or Flightscope), but it's the right change because of where they're coming from and what direction they need to take next.

Without a good instructor you're going to spend a lot of time guessing, or just going on what the Trackman says. The Trackman, though, is just a dumb machine. It's a great tool, but it's just a tool.

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I was taught to build my swing so my start line was as neutral as possible relative to my body alignments.  

On driver I was taught never to try to turn it over.

I was taught for a draw use three wood (which I don't even bag so...).

I don't really deviate from my stock shot off the tee,  however I also don't practice on the range at all so that's probably wise.  

 

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4 hours ago, Alx said:

Thats 60 left and 60 right. Even at 50/40 it's still 90 yards. Atleast on the courses I play thats an unplayable dispersion.

For a midteen handicappers its probably good.

So you dont think a 90(120) yard wide shot zone is a bad inconsistency and shows that theres probably a fundamental flaw causing it?

Yeah, the courses I normally play that's not as penal. Not the case for today though. :-D

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Note: This thread is 974 days old. We appreciate that you found this thread instead of starting a new one, but if you plan to post here please make sure it's still relevant. If not, please start a new topic. Thank you!

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