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sebsmash

How Much Has Recent Driver Tech Improved?

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I'm just curious how much recent driver technology has improved. I play an R11s with a stock S- shaft, I notice that the new drivers sound much different, does the new equipment play much longer?

I typically drive 260-280 and decently straight. I'm hoping to get a driver with a custom shaft in a month or so.

 

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My personal experience.   I'm a bogie golfer.   I went to Carl's Golfland (Michigan) and was fitted for a driver.   I know nothing about shafts but was fitted using Trackman.  My distance increase 30 yards from what I was playing and my pattern was tighter.   I'm convinced the newer tech has helped me.

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I think a proper fitting helps alot more then the driver "tech" so to speak.  gettting the right loft, face angle, weight, shaft profile, shaft length etc will make a much larger difference.

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Agree on the fitting.  Go to someone who knows what they are doing and they can make some dramatic improvements for you if you have a decent swing and have never been fitted by a quality fitter.  

In regards to how much the tech has helped, I honestly believe the only legit improvement has been forgiveness.  Maybe a few more yards, but if fitted properly in the past, I have strong doubts you are seeing 20+ yard improvements with each club release like TM and others market to you.  There are tests that have been done but they seem to be all over the map in findings.

My honest opinion is if you play a lot and have the $ I would get a new driver maybe every 3-4 years.  Otherwise, save your money for lessons instead.

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On 5/12/2017 at 11:05 AM, sebsmash said:

I'm just curious how much recent driver technology has improved. I play an R11s with a stock S- shaft, I notice that the new drivers sound much different, does the new equipment play much longer?

I typically drive 260-280 and decently straight. I'm hoping to get a driver with a custom shaft in a month or so.

I have a caviate with this. With a properly fitted driver, centered strikes will not see much gain in distance. You might see your average increase do to more ball speed forgiveness. 

Also you might find a newer club will fit your swing better and that could show a pretty big increase in distance. 

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On 13/05/2017 at 1:05 AM, sebsmash said:

 

I typically drive 260-280 and decently straight. I'm hoping to get a driver with a custom shaft in a month or so.

 

Then why are you even considering a new driver? If an amateur golfer averages 260-280 and is pretty straight, he is not looking for a new driver, I promise you.

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On 5/12/2017 at 11:05 AM, sebsmash said:

I'm just curious how much recent driver technology has improved. I play an R11s with a stock S- shaft, I notice that the new drivers sound much different, does the new equipment play much longer?

I typically drive 260-280 and decently straight. I'm hoping to get a driver with a custom shaft in a month or so.

You're not missing out on anything. 

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5/19: About 15 minutes with the metronome app tonight. Settled in at about 42 bpm and used a simple, "one...two" count for backswing to downswing. Spent some time with both my driver and my pitching wedge. A few minutes of tempo'd practice swings and then a few minutes hitting plastic balls (with tempo) with each club.

Edited by roamin

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On 5/17/2017 at 6:48 PM, Shorty said:

Then why are you even considering a new driver? If an amateur golfer averages 260-280 and is pretty straight, he is not looking for a new driver, I promise you.

Yeah! I wish I had this guy's problems!

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I agree with all of the others. Get a proper fitting.

For me? I was using the SLDR driver 12* with a Sr Shaft. I was hitting it a good 160 to 175 yards. 

I went to the Titleist Thursday event here in Sacramento. It is where Titleist gives you a free fitting session for what ever you are thinking of replacing.

I wasn't thinking of replacing, but was curious.

I went in, he watched me swing the club, said try this "catch the rain" (turning my hands over at the bottom of my swing). Ball went a little farther. 
He said - here try this. Then try this. Shafts, head, more shaft information. (he brought, all, ALL, of the shafts that are being offered for the clubs)

I was fitted for the 917D2 with the Blueboard S+ 70 in Regular. I regularly carry 230 yards with roll out (some days more than others.) coming in between 20 and 30 yards more. I hit the M2, Ping G, M1, King Cobra F7 (can't remember which one), ... I hit everything that Haggin Oaks had in their super shop (we call it the library - you check em out and return em).

6 months later I am still hitting it straight (no on purpose shot shaping for me) and long...long for me. (I am 55 yrs young). I hit my 3wood roughly 235, my 7wood about 220ish.

Go get fit at a reputable fitting place. You will not regret it.

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On 5/17/2017 at 11:12 AM, oregongolfguy said:

I think a proper fitting helps alot more then the driver "tech" so to speak.  gettting the right loft, face angle, weight, shaft profile, shaft length etc will make a much larger difference.

For the average golfer, getting a driver "that won't hurt your game" is critical. Getting fitted forces you to take a look at what really works, rather than what you think works.

As for tech, a lot of it has been incremental change, with an occasional tech bubble that may or may not take off. Depends on when "recent" starts....

  • 2004: TM R7 driver features adjustable weights in the head to help shape ball flight.
  • 2008: Muzuno MP600 driver features "fast  track" slots in the sole that let you move weighted screws to left or right. It was going on clearance about the time I got fitted for my Callaway HyperX Tour driver.
  • 2012: TM goes with "loft up" ... touting high-launch, low-spin drivers as the route to exceptional distance. Several OEMs start making mini-drivers. TM also adds SLDR and Jetspeed drivers.
  • 2015: "Turbulators," small fins in the crown of the Ping G30 drivers that promise better wind flow over the head.
  • 2017: The Callaway Epic driver with "jailbreak" technology: two metal posts behind the clubface that promise better power transfer through the ball, and a gain of about 10 yards...

It depends on how much the technology is new, and how much it is recycled from a few years back.

And so we haven't forgotten, parting wisdom from above...

On 5/26/2017 at 11:40 AM, MrFreeze said:

I agree with all of the others. Get a proper fitting. ...

 

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Modern tech really allows for more adjustability than anything IMO.  Go get fit, like others have suggested.  The right shaft/head combo and getting those head settings in the right spot will make the most difference.  Honestly, a good driver fitting is something I really need to go through myself.

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On 5/29/2017 at 1:35 PM, WUTiger said:

For the average golfer, getting a driver "that won't hurt your game" is critical. Getting fitted forces you to take a look at what really works, rather than what you think works.

As for tech, a lot of it has been incremental change, with an occasional tech bubble that may or may not take off. Depends on when "recent" starts....

  • 2004: TM R7 driver features adjustable weights in the head to help shape ball flight.
  • 2008: Muzuno MP600 driver features "fast  track" slots in the sole that let you move weighted screws to left or right. It was going on clearance about the time I got fitted for my Callaway HyperX Tour driver.
  • 2012: TM goes with "loft up" ... touting high-launch, low-spin drivers as the route to exceptional distance. Several OEMs start making mini-drivers. TM also adds SLDR and Jetspeed drivers.
  • 2015: "Turbulators," small fins in the crown of the Ping G30 drivers that promise better wind flow over the head.
  • 2017: The Callaway Epic driver with "jailbreak" technology: two metal posts behind the clubface that promise better power transfer through the ball, and a gain of about 10 yards...

It depends on how much the technology is new, and how much it is recycled from a few years back.

And so we haven't forgotten, parting wisdom from above...

 

Funny you mention the mp 600.  That's my gamer.  Sweet driver.

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On 5/17/2017 at 3:48 PM, Shorty said:

Then why are you even considering a new driver? If an amateur golfer averages 260-280 and is pretty straight, he is not looking for a new driver, I promise you.

This.

 

I still hit an old TM burner superfast in 10.5 with stock S shaft.  Had it since high school, 26 now, and its gone thru some changes, but can't get it to leave the bag.  Got rid of the long R shaft a couple years ago for my buddies S shaft.  Lately been tinkering with some Lead tape and hitting it better than ever.  

 

I was playing with a group the other day and riding with our buddy who is a scratch golfer and I pipe one right down the middle 300 with roll.  I'm talking about the lead tape and different shafts I'm looking at all this other different tech.  He replies, "You just put one 300 in the middle of the fairway.  What else do you want?"

 

 

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The biggest change has been optimizing CG location, especially for people who swing fast. I use to hit the ball with 3200-3500 spin on a good strike. Now I hit the ball near 2000 rpm. I get more carry and more roll. 

 

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Yeah, backspin has certainly seemed to come down in recent years. I was shocked when I got fitted and came away with the GBB. 

Edited by Apoc81

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Note: This thread is 1266 days old. We appreciate that you found this thread instead of starting a new one, but if you plan to post here please make sure it's still relevant. If not, please start a new topic. Thank you!

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