• Announcements

    • iacas

      Visit FlagstickRule.com   03/13/2017

      Visit the site flagstickrule.com to read about and sign a petition for the USGA/R&A regarding the one terrible rule in the proposed "modernized" rules for 2019.
    • iacas

      Win a Cart with Sun Mountain and TST!   06/02/2017

      You can win a Speed Cart GT or a Micro Cart GT from Sun Mountain!
Papa Steve 55

plumb bobbing

74 posts in this topic

Well it's voodoo, and has to do with aligning your chi/chakras with the magnetic poles of the earth. Works best with Mercury in retrograde. I have used my putter successfully to find potable water and natural gas. True story.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sign up (or log in) today! It's free (and you won't see this ad anymore)!

Sign up (or log in) today! It's free (and you won't see this ad anymore)!

It does not tell you which way the break is going. You have to know which way the break is going before you plumb bob.

For a right to left break:

Right arm holding club and right eye closed, bottom of putter lined up on the right side of the ball, then move your gaze up to the hole. The distance between the shaft and the hole is the amount of break.

Do the opposite for left to right break. Left arm holding club, left eye closed, bottom of putter lined on left side of ball.

It takes 2 seconds to do this, and is easy to do while waiting for your turn.

Not sure why all the hate on here, it works.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

53 minutes ago, softjones said:

Not sure why all the hate on here, it works.

Because it doesn't.

53 minutes ago, softjones said:

Right arm holding club and right eye closed, bottom of putter lined up on the right side of the ball, then move your gaze up to the hole. The distance between the shaft and the hole is the amount of break.

Do the opposite for left to right break. Left arm holding club, left eye closed, bottom of putter lined on left side of ball.

Okay, before you do all of that… take a step one foot to the right or left.

Oops!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

29 minutes ago, iacas said:

Because it doesn't.

Okay, before you do all of that… take a step one foot to the right or left.

Oops!

Well yea you have to be lined up with the hole. Not that hard.

Works really well for me when there's just one break in the putt.

You have to have an understanding of the break first. Then can use it to find an aiming point. Landmarks in the background and marks on the green work great for me.

My handicap is awful and am clearly not an expert..but for simply reading one break putts, if you plumb bob correct, it works.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, softjones said:

My handicap is awful and am clearly not an expert..but for simply reading one break putts, if you plumb bob correct, it works.

It really doesn't. Welcome to the site, and please be open-minded… I'm glad you feel it works for you, because confidence can be helpful, but the geometry here is pretty simple: it doesn't work. At all.

3 minutes ago, softjones said:

Well yea you have to be lined up with the hole. Not that hard.

If you're truly lined up with the ball and the hole… then the shaft will split the ball and the hole. Two points can form a line, and if you're on the line from the ball to the hole, and the shaft is vertical, it will go right down the middle of both of those.

And let's imagine that by trying to use your left eye and your right arm (or whatever it was that you said) that you can create a situation where you're standing on the line from the ball to the hole, but your eye and the putter shaft are OFF that line slightly, creating an angle… that angle would be the same whether the slope between your ball and the hole was 0% (no side tilt) or 10%, but those putts would have VERY different break amounts.

People think plumb bobbing works because, whether they do it subconsciously or not, they stand a little below that line. They aren't standing directly on that line. So then when they hold their putter shaft and put it through the ball, they're aimed toward the high side of the hole.

3 minutes ago, softjones said:

You have to have an understanding of the break first. Then can use it to find an aiming point. Landmarks in the background and marks on the green work great for me.

Right… which defeats the purpose of plumb bobbing. Plumb bobbing is "supposed" to help you READ the putt. If you "need to have an understanding of the break first" then plumb bobbing is completely unnecessary.

If you're talking about using the shaft as a straight edge to find an intermediate target… you don't have to plumb bob for that, either:

 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

If someone could explain the science behind plumb-bobbing to me, I might start to look more closely at it.  As it stands, I've heard the process described, in several different (and sometimes contradictory) ways, but nobody can tell me how it works, other than providing a (hopefully) vertical reference line.  

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Thanks for the thoughtful response. I am open minded and am taking in what you say, I just always thought it worked.

I do use it as a final assessment of the break. A quick bob to confirm what I thought the break was. So I guess it's pointless if you're already reading the green well..but if it matches what I thought the break was, and turns out to be what the break actually is, doesn't it help in giving myself a final target to aim for? Something concrete in my head to help get any doubt out of my stroke.

I'm having trouble letting go of this because it means I look like a dummy out there with my club out in front of me. Hate to look like/ be "that guy"

 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

23 minutes ago, DaveP043 said:

If someone could explain the science behind plumb-bobbing to me, I might start to look more closely at it.  As it stands, I've heard the process described, in several different (and sometimes contradictory) ways, but nobody can tell me how it works, other than providing a (hopefully) vertical reference line.  

There is no science or geometry behind it. It doesn't do anything except what you said at the end there.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Once I was paired up w/ a gentleman who showed me how to do this “plumbing” or “plumb bobbing,” or whatever. I tried it for a little bit, but I found all it does is make you more nervous when you stand over the putt.

The only thing I deliberate on is getting the speed of the putt right. Speed comes from having a good stroke. I think the break requires relatively minor adjustment, and a lot of it is solved by having the right speed.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

15 minutes ago, softjones said:

I'm having trouble letting go of this because it means I look like a dummy out there with my club out in front of me. Hate to look like/ be "that guy"

So stop being that guy. :-)

Check out the rest of the site. Get the rest of your game on the path to improvement.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Post #48   Posted (edited)

3 hours ago, DaveP043 said:

If someone could explain the science behind plumb-bobbing to me, I might start to look more closely at it.  As it stands, I've heard the process described, in several different (and sometimes contradictory) ways, but nobody can tell me how it works, other than providing a (hopefully) vertical reference line.  

The way it was shown to me, years, ago, is that the eye, ball & hole have to all be on the same vertical plane. Hang the putter straight down (if it's a flange putter, turn it 90 degrees so the toe points at the hole so it doesn't hang at an angle). Cover the ball with the putter shaft. Look up at the hole - whichever side the hole is on, it breaks that way. So I guess the "science" is having everything on on plane & having the shaft serve as the 'plumb' like surveyors do (come to think of that, if we have any surveyors here maybe they can explain...I'm just an urban planner lol).

As I said earlier, I use it as a decision-maker. I read the putt in the traditional methods, but sometimes & I just can't seem to get the 'read' down that way...so I have doubt. I'll plumb-bob to just make up my mind. At times it may lead me to the wrong choice, but at least I made a choice & I can commit to a line. Which is something rather important - to commit to a line. If you have no idea which way it breaks, then it really doesn't matter where you aim, right?

So I guess I would suggest to use it when needed, but not as the 'only' method to read a putt - look from behind, walk the putt, find the high point, all that stuff. If that doesn't crystallize the line in your mind, bob it. 

Edited by zipazoid
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, zipazoid said:

The way it was shown to me, years, ago, is that the eye, ball & hole have to all be on the same vertical plane. Hang the putter straight down (if it's a flange putter, turn it 90 degrees so the toe points at the hole so it doesn't hang at an angle). Cover the ball with the putter shaft. Look up at the hole - whichever side the hole is on, it breaks that way. So I guess the "science" is having everything on on plane & having the shaft serve as the 'plumb' like surveyors do (come to think of that, if we have any surveyors here maybe they can explain...I'm just an urban planner lol).

This is pretty simple geometry.  A line and a point define a plane (your vertical putter shaft and the ball, for instance).  If the other two points, the hole and your eye, are on the same plane, then both the ball and the hole will appear to be directly behind the putter shaft.  If they're all on the same plane, this is a fact, not interpretation of any kind.  The only way for the hole to appear to be left or right is if its not on the same plane.  This may appear due to a subconscious tendency to stand on the "low" side of the line, and perhaps that tendency is why plumb-bobbing works for some people.  But that subconscious stuff isn't science or geometry, its psychology, and its not going to be consistent for all people.  If you really want a decision-maker, I suggest you learn to read the ground with your feet, as AimPoint asks you to do.  Even without taking a class, you can physically sense a slope, and that's likely to be more accurate than plumb-bobbing.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Post #51   Posted (edited)

I've messed with AimPoint a little & am intrigued by it. But the bobbing is kinda ingrained...even if I did AimPoint I can still see me bobbing at times. It's almost subconscious now lol.

Edited by zipazoid
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

13 hours ago, zipazoid said:

I've messed with AimPoint a little & am intrigued by it. But the bobbing is kinda ingrained...even if I did AimPoint I can still see me bobbing at times. It's almost subconscious now lol.

Let go of your feelings. Trust your feet Luke.

obi wan.jpg

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

13 hours ago, zipazoid said:

I've messed with AimPoint a little & am intrigued by it. But the bobbing is kinda ingrained...even if I did AimPoint I can still see me bobbing at times. It's almost subconscious now lol.

If you took an Aimpoint class you wouldn't give bobbing a second thought.   

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

32 minutes ago, dennyjones said:

If you took an Aimpoint class you wouldn't give bobbing a second thought.   

Maybe I should.

Here's what I know about Aimpoint - it's basically about feeling the slope with your feet, right? You're supposed to find the part of the putt that has the most slope in it, then based on how it "feels" thru your feet, you assign a digit to it, from 1 to 4...say it's 2. You then stand behind the ball & put up 2 fingers next to the hole & that's your aiming point. Do I have that correct?

I just need to restate this, as I don't want anyone to think I have some kind of devotion to bobbing...I don't. I read the putt in the traditional methods, and 9 times out of 10 I get my line that way. But sometimes the break is just too nuanced to tell, so I do a quick bob to give me one last piece of information if needed. I don't like dead-straight putts...I want to play 'some' kind of break so I have more of the hole to work with. So if the bob shows a bit of movement to the left, then I'll aim right lip (or whatever).

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now