Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
swffjvl

Question on what can affect your game

Note: This thread is 819 days old. We appreciate that you found this thread instead of starting a new one, but if you plan to post here please make sure it's still relevant. If not, please start a new topic. Thank you!

21 posts / 1199 viewsLast Reply

Recommended Posts

I'm very new to golf, have only been on the course 4 times, I play 9 holes. (par 29) I know it's maybe too early to ask this question, but I think I may have gone through THIS my last round.  Excluding the first round (jitters), I was very comfortable the next 2. (49 and 44 for my second and third round)  This last round it just didn't feel good or right.

Before I played this 4th round of my life, I went to the driving range, did ok (2:30),,,, 90 Degrees,,,, was fatigued from working 4 am to noon,,,, (round was at 3:30), forgot my gatorade on a brick wall at the clubhouse,,,, and my Shirt was soaked through.

I'm not looking for someone to say, "sure you're going to play bad like that" but just want to know are there things that happen to you guys that just ruin a round and should you just pay a bad round when you know these things will affect you, or just back out, go home and have a beer?

Thanks,  Joe

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Want to hide this ad? Register for free today!

5 minutes ago, swffjvl said:

I'm not looking for someone to say, "sure you're going to play bad like that" but just want to know are there things that happen to you guys that just ruin a round and should you just pay a bad round when you know these things will affect you, or just back out, go home and have a beer?

Welcome to golf!  First, I'll say that if you get a little dehydrated, there's a really good chance you'll perform poorly, no matter what you're doing.  But beyond that, most of us golfers don't need a reason to have a bad day, sometimes it just happens.  With experience, hopefully you'll get past the point where a single thing can put you off your game, that's a big hurdle along the way.  But sometimes, you just have a bad day.  Case in point, on Saturday I tied my best round of the year.  Sunday, feeling just the same, I was 11 strokes higher, close to my worst of the year.  I don't know why the two days were so different, but they were.  

The thing for me is, I'd rather enjoy the day playing golf with my friends (or even with strangers, potential new friends) than sit at home in air-conditioned comfort with a beer.  Its NEVER better to go home instead of playing, at least for me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Playing in the heat when you are not use to it, can negatively effect your game. As mentioned above, even a hint of dehydration won't allow your mental and physical golf game work properly.

I play in triple digit heat quite a bit. I start my hydration process the day before my anticipated round. I continue the hydration process during my round, and afterwards. 

Also, if not use to it, the heat might make you play faster, or slower than you normally would, taking you out of your comfort zone.

Perhaps you were just tired. Again, your mental and physical game will not be up to par due to fatigue. 

Even though you may not want to hear it, perhaps it was your time to just have a poor game. Happens to everyone. 

At any rate, after only four rounds, I wouldn't worry too much about a poor showing. It's not a big deal. As time passes, your game will get consistantly better. (consistantly better also includes poorer play) Just hang in there, and enjoy your golf journey. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

I'm not proud to say that just about any darn thing can affect me.

Case in point, I was playing solo the other day and had three goons roar up behind me playing some kind of race/scramble game. Seeing them come two holes away, I waited on the fourth tee to let them go through. They hole out on three and tell me they'll just cut over the eight. That's the Bandit Country style of golf Kittyhawk is known for. None the less, it just pissed me off a bit more than I already was.

The better golfers don't let this sort of stuff bother them. I'm just not one of those.

Edited by mcanadiens

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Thanks Gents.

Bottom line I have things to work on, for sure, but mostly I am trying to keep positive no matter where my ball lands. I just can't let things bother me (other than I have to work on this or that) or I'm afraid I won't go forward.

 

Joe

Edited by swffjvl

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Golf happens...but yep, fatigue, dehydration, discomfort and any number of other emotional and physical factors will affect your game.  Hell, sometimes just the alignment of the planets can mess with mine! ;-) 

Welcome to the madness!  :beer:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

3 hours ago, David in FL said:

Golf happens...but yep, fatigue, dehydration, discomfort and any number of other emotional and physical factors will affect your game.  Hell, sometimes just the alignment of the planets can mess with mine! ;-) 

Welcome to the madness!  :beer:

I fixed that planet alignment problem with the fact that when golfing during daylight hours, if I can't see the planets, they can't see me. However, golf being the game it is, when you fix one thing, another thing shows up. After missing some easy putts the other day, I finally concluded, and was able to blame the possibility of Yellowstone N.P. erupting on my poor putting. Seismic activity made the ground move down here. :-O

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

6 hours ago, swffjvl said:

I'm not looking for someone to say, "sure you're going to play bad like that" but just want to know are there things that happen to you guys that just ruin a round and should you just pay a bad round when you know these things will affect you, or just back out, go home and have a beer?

Fortunately for you and me, our paychecks don't depend on how well we play.  Some days you play well some days you don't.  The important thing is you're enjoying it (and whatever else you aim to get out of golf, such as exercise).  Getting better will come with time.

Also, as for your shirt soaked through, you may want to look into dri-fit and equivalents, especially for 90 degree weather.  There are various "store brands" where a dri-fit Polo can be had for ~$20.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

7 minutes ago, Shindig said:

Fortunately for you and me, our paychecks don't depend on how well we play.  Some days you play well some days you don't.  The important thing is you're enjoying it (and whatever else you aim to get out of golf, such as exercise).  Getting better will come with time.

Also, as for your shirt soaked through, you may want to look into dri-fit and equivalents, especially for 90 degree weather.  There are various "store brands" where a dri-fit Polo can be had for ~$20.  

Yes, I learned wearing cotton is NOT the way to go....I believe it was a major problem, felt like I walked out of a pool with my shirt on and walked to the tee. Will check some out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can have a bad round if you... don't care enough, care too much, are dehydrated, too hydrated, too stiff or too limber.  Didn't warm up enough or warmed up too much.  There's also your chakra and what phase the moon is in... those are also important.  This all needs to be graphed and shared in detail on the Game Golf thread.  :-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

On 7/17/2017 at 7:20 AM, DaveP043 said:

First, I'll say that if you get a little dehydrated, there's a really good chance you'll perform poorly, no matter what you're doing.  But beyond that, most of us golfers don't need a reason to have a bad day, sometimes it just happens.

In early summer, I played in 95* heat and shot 43 + 54 = 97. The difference in the nines? On the back nine, I started to get achy in the forearms and feeling tense and jerky. I was starting to get dehydrated.

In my revised plans, I drink plenty of water the evening before, and then usually drink some Gatorade on the way to the course. On the front nine, I'll drink water, and then switch to Gatorade on the back. A guy I work with is a marathon runner, says that runners, golfers and bicyclists should add in some electrolytes (such as Gatorade) after a couple hours of sustained exercise. Otherwise, staying with just water starts flushing electrolytes out of the body system.

---------------------

Beyond dehydration, it's how you approach your shots. On the range, work on developing your swing. On the course, plan your shot, line it up and hit it. Don't overthink your shots. Just let it happen.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

All good tips. I am going to work on proper hydration, not only for my game, but for me also.  Thanks all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just remember the old expression: "The worst day on the golf course is better than your best day at work".

No matter how long you play golf, this crazy game will find a way to get in your head some days had you just play bad.  Look at what is going on at The Open right now on TV.

The trick is to try and shrug it off and keep going.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

12 minutes ago, scotth said:

Just remember the old expression: "The worst day on the golf course is better than your best day at work".

As much as certain workdays are difficult and others tedious, I don't buy that.

Some days, I do some pretty damn impressive stuff at work. I come home feeling accomplished. That doesn't always happen on the course.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

1 hour ago, mcanadiens said:

As much as certain workdays are difficult and others tedious, I don't buy that.

Some days, I do some pretty damn impressive stuff at work. I come home feeling accomplished. That doesn't always happen on the course.

You are lucky to have a rewarding job.   Most people don't find fulfillment in their job, other than a paycheck.   Being retired, I still think a bad day of golf is better than a day at work... and I'm not working anymore.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

3 hours ago, mcanadiens said:

As much as certain workdays are difficult and others tedious, I don't buy that.

Some days, I do some pretty damn impressive stuff at work. I come home feeling accomplished. That doesn't always happen on the course.

I'm with you.  But as @dennyjones points out, not everyone has a fulfilling job.

A little over four years ago I would certainly have agreed with the statement. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

21 hours ago, dennyjones said:

You are lucky to have a rewarding job.   Most people don't find fulfillment in their job, other than a paycheck.   Being retired, I still think a bad day of golf is better than a day at work... and I'm not working anymore.

I have to agree. I work 2 jobs and at this point in life, neither are fulfilling. My wife constantly reminds me of that and to find something that is. I have been with my day Job 38yrs, am now 60, and just want to finish with it and retire.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On 7/19/2017 at 11:36 PM, WUTiger said:

---------------------

Beyond dehydration, it's how you approach your shots. On the range, work on developing your swing. On the course, plan your shot, line it up and hit it. Don't overthink your shots. Just let it happen.

I agree with that.  My worst rounds seem to come when I'm overthinking.  I think I play best when my mind is just blank and I'm enjoying the scenery.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Note: This thread is 819 days old. We appreciate that you found this thread instead of starting a new one, but if you plan to post here please make sure it's still relevant. If not, please start a new topic. Thank you!

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  



  • Want to join this community?

    We'd love to have you!

    Sign Up
  • 2019 TST Partners

    PING Golf
    FlightScope Mevo
  • Posts

    • Last Monday I experienced a very slow front 9, taking at least 2 1/2 hours. 3 riders and 1 walking, and we, a twosome, waited at every shot, except the tee, where they all teed off before we could get close enough to ask to play through. The walker wasn't very good, often hitting his drive 100-150 yards. They all played from the blues, and the walker would tee off last. The riders would take off, often leaving the walker behind to fend for himself. Finally, after a couple of holes, one of the carts would hang back, help look for a ball, etc. When they reached the green, the walker would often park his clubs on the wrong side, and after holing out, would retrieve his clubs and have to walk back across the green to get to the next tee. Did I mention the walker also moved in slow motion? Conserving energy, maybe? At the 10th, a par 5, while we're waiting to take our approach shots to the green, the walker holes out, shake hands, and heads back to the clubhouse. After that, we never came close to catching them again. Finished in 4 hours total.  
    • I break 90 now and then, and I think I am starting to notice the commonalities. 1. Don't go OB.  Just don't.  If it's a reasonable likelihood, think about club choice.  I often play a 310 yard hole with OB all the way down the right, and it's the first hole.  It's also a little downhill.  A bad 5 wood gets me within a 9 iron or less, a good one a sand wedge, or even lob wedge.  I don't need driver on that hole.  Without the OB, I think I'd play driver, but first tee, there's just no real benefit. 2.  When driver is the club, hit it.  Closer is better.  But see #1. 3.  Get out of the sand in one.  To anywhere.  Green is better, out is critical. 4.  If I'm within 10 feet of the green, I need to be thinking up and down.  Won't always happen, but those are important shots.  And where I get a lot of my pars, "almost" GIRs. 5.  I agree with not trying the hero shot, but not wimping out, either.  Know what you can do, and go for it. 6.  Three putts are bad, but don't beat yourself up over a three putt from 50 feet.  (Actually don't beat yourself up over anything, let it go, and move on.) 7.  I have found in my best rounds, I block out a lot of the noise.  Take a breath before each shot.  Focus.  Not every second, but in the time around the shots. 8.  If something feels wrong, back off.  The grass grabs on the backswing, stop!  It should not happen a lot, but once your head is unhappy, bad things are in store. 9.  Be aggressive, but not stupid.  If you can carry 220 on your best shot, and you need 210, don't do it.  I think you need to have a 80 or maybe even 90 percent probability of success.  The two shots that failure is likely to cause eat into your margin pretty quickly.      
    • Nope. That is troll-level phrasing there.
    • Touche.  On the "no" voter thing.  But like I said... feeding the sharks.  I'm trying to find a middle ground for you guys but it seems like human lives come in second place to your need for total accuracy and fear of inconvenience.
  • TST Blog Entries

  • Blog Entries

  • Today's Birthdays

    1. Edsland
      Edsland
      (65 years old)
    2. KingHack82
      KingHack82
      (37 years old)
    3. snowbeast
      snowbeast
      (32 years old)

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Welcome to TST! Signing up is free, and you'll see fewer ads and can talk with fellow golf enthusiasts! By using TST, you agree to our Terms of Use, our Privacy Policy, and our Guidelines.

The popup will be closed in 10 seconds...