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Tee box etiquette


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What etiquette should be used on the tee box?

I personally don't like it when someone stands behind me, in the peripheral of my backswing.

I feel like a bit of jerk asking people to move, so typically try to just ignore it.

 

 

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Everyone is different.  Like you though, I prefer that people not stand behind my line of play.  I much prefer that someone stand either directly in front of me (as I take my stance) or completely behind me.

As a young caddie way back when, I was taught to present the bag to the player for club selection, and to then step directly back, again, to stay in front of their chest, perpendicular to the line of play.

If someone inadvertently stands somewhere that bothers you, it's perfectly fine to ask them nicely to move....  :beer:

 

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It is well known among Tour pros not to stand on the "reverse line" of any player's shot! I can't understand why such a simple idea shouldn't transfer to the general population.

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8 hours ago, rehmwa said:

Don't ignore it, just them your preference.  It's only jerky if the request is made in a jerky way.

You can't predict what people like or don't like.  Nor should you expect others to read your mind.  I like someone directly behind my flight line and watching the ball.  Some people need to be able to see everyone as someone in the blind spot makes them uncomfy - others want people hidden.  I don't even mind movement and talking as long as it's not sudden/surprising.....But I'd venture to guess that a 'universal' assumptions is to be quiet and not fidget or move.  Position? not likely.  I would assume that the ideal place to stand is at about 4 or 5 o'clock (if the teed ball is the center of the clock and noon is the intended target) - and I suspect I'd be wrong with a large percentage of golfers, correct with another large percentage, and the rest just won't care.

If someone asks NICELY to another to stand somewhere else, then I'd say THAT's the best etiquette.  Anyone rude or presumptive about it usually gets more of whatever bugs them, because they were a jerk about it.

I don't like most 'etiquette' discussions, it's pre-supposes there is some sort of 'default' everyone should know about totally subjective things.  But usually it's just something to let the grouchy people complain and feel superior about when someone else doesn't have their magic 'etiquette' decoder rings.

Talk to each other, be honest and courteous - IMHO that goes a lot further than any set of social assumptions.  As for this stuff, meh, other people don't 'bug' the player, the player chooses to let other people bug them

Thanks for the awesome post.  Everyone is different when it comes to how they prefer things when playing.  I tend to think that those who get "bothered" by seemingly insignificant stuff, are a tad on the whiner side.

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As stated above there is nothing wrong with asking someone nicely to move. I personally don't like people to stand directly behind me as I can see them in my peripheral. The same goes on the putting green.

The thing is this, some people just don't know golf etiquette and have no idea where to stand. Asking them nicely to move will help them learn to be a more courteous player. I just played on Friday and was paired with two young guys, super nice kids in their early 20's pretty decent players. I don't know how it worked out this way but the one guy had a putt on the same line as mine on each of the first 3 holes. On the first hole he stood right behind me and I just ignored it as it was just a casual game. He did it on the second hole again and I politely asked him to move. On the third hole he actually asked me where the correct place to stand was. He just didn't know. So I showed him where to stand and how to step in after the putt was struck so you can get a good look at the line. He was thankful for the info. I was taught golf etiquette by my father and grandfather, but some people don't get that opportunity. 

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2 hours ago, NM Golf said:

 

I was taught golf etiquette by my father and grandfather, but some people don't get that opportunity. 

Yea I would say a lot of people just don't know better because they were never taught the right way. I definitely didn't know when I first started playing. I bet I still do things that are against golf etiquette but the only way I learn is when people teach me. I picked up the game in my early 20s never had a father figure to teach me the game.

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I am really big on not letting other golfers bother me during my swing. Some do things intentionally, for their own reasons, to throw a golfer's swing off, by putting non swing thoughts in their head. These golfers are jerks, but with a good preshot routine they can be easily ignored. 

I am very good at ignoring folks who deserve it. :-D

If someone is new to the game, and short on golfing manners, they are fair game for a short lesson on doing the right things. 

 

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I'm the opposite, and can understand why some golfers actually stand behind your line. I actually prefer someone stand behind my line so they can see where the ball goes, and get the occasional "Yup, saw it. . ." on a duff that trickles it's way down the fairway. :ninja:

Also, sometimes it helps a lot when the sun is in your line.

If it bothers you,  just let them know and ask them to move in front or behind you whatever your preference. Just let them know that you are uncomfortable about whatever reason you don't like it. Same goes for putting and regular shots. I'm left handed and often had a partner inadvertently place the cart on the right of my line right about where my back swing takes the club. Some rounds, I'd need to remind them a few times. One time, someone didn't remember, and I thought he was somewhere else, the club head missed his head by inches and hit the roof of the cart, although I apologized profusely, he definitely remembered to put the cart to the left of my line for the rest of the round. :whistle:

 

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1 hour ago, Patch said:

I am really big on not letting other golfers bother me during my swing. Some do things intentionally, for their own reasons, to throw a golfer's swing off, by putting non swing thoughts in their head. These golfers are jerks, but with a good preshot routine they can be easily ignored. 

I am very good at ignoring folks who deserve it. :-D

If someone is new to the game, and short on golfing manners, they are fair game for a short lesson on doing the right things. 

 

Good point about a Preshot routine.  I have 'friends' that try to get into my head too, I'll work on that Preshot routine!

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1 hour ago, JRobber said:

Good point about a Preshot routine.  I have 'friends' that try to get into my head too, I'll work on that Preshot routine!

Of course, if you suck at golf the only way of keeping up is to make everyone else suck too! :-D

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Normally I would only stand in front of or behind someone on the tee box (3 or 9 o'clock relative to their shot). However, some of the more (ahem) senior members of our group need some extra help with locating their drives. For these gents I'll often use the 4 or 5 o'clock position. That can be helpful especially if hitting toward the sun. 

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It's not a big deal with me if they stand well back, but I would just politely say something if it bothered me. If the other person objects in any way, I just wouldn't choose to play golf with them again.

Usually the only reason I see people stand directly behind another players swing path is when the hitter has volunteered he/she has trouble following the ball and has asked for help spotting. I've played with a guy with spotty vision who doesn't know where his ball went more often than not, but it's not a problem - I usually stand behind him but at about 30-45 degrees to the side where he can't see me anyway (e.g. if his head is pointed at 12 o'clock and he's hitting toward 9 o'clock, I stand about 10 yards away at 4:00-4:30). He would lose a lot of balls if we didn't help spot for him.

I don't mind, but I know some players object even more strongly to another player standing behind them when they putt (to get a read for their own putt on a similar line). As tempting as it is, I don't stand anywhere near another player who is putting - unless we're playing a scramble in which case it's encouraged for all to get a read off the first putter.

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I have yet to play with someone who cares enough where I stand to let me know where they want me (or not want me) to stand. 

I may not be a great player or anything, but it seems kind of silly to be "affected" by where someone stands on the tee box, or even on greens. Life, and nature, are full of distractions. Do you get bent out of shape when a crow calls during your putt? Someone honks their horn during your back swing (intentionally or not) on the tee box? 

I don't hit a "better shot" because of where people stand, or how they do/don't move. 

The only one I can see is a player casting a shadow over a putt line. That one has some merit, but even then if someone did it to me I really wouldn't care. 

That said I'm pretty non-confrontational so I always try to stand out of people's way, so I don't have a problem with anyone.

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Personally I don't care where you stand. I also don't care about keeping quiet during my swing.
I grew up playing baseball and other contact sports. I now play on a muni course which is in the middle of a city. Sirens, car horns, barking dogs and loud neighbors.
I typically hum to myself as a part of my pre-shot routine.
I am used to people talking through my swing and my putting.

On the flip side, if you can not be like me, simply ask me to move.
I find golfer can be like my spouse, I cannot guess what you want, You must be specific!

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Agreed, stand wherever you want, it doesn't bother me, talk all you want as well.

I wouldn't mind someone asking me to move, whatever, but it sounds a bit uptight to me.

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So far I've been lucky to play with people and at golf clubs where good golf etiquette is the norm, including on the tee and around the greens. Walking down the fairway or waiting for the group in front is when the f-bombs, pranks, and coarse talk usually comes out. But most guys are pretty considerate if you're taking a swing.

If someone were to stand uncomfortably close on the tee box I'd politely let them know they should not trust me so much. Talking on the other hand really irritates me. In my business and home life I'm a very good listener. Normally this is to my advantage. However, when I'm on the tee (or doing anything else) I find it hard to tune people out who are talking or describing something. 

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53 minutes ago, MrDC said:

Agreed, stand wherever you want, it doesn't bother me, talk all you want as well.

I wouldn't mind someone asking me to move, whatever, but it sounds a bit uptight to me.

I've never had an issue with noise on the tee but have been distracted while putting, maybe because putting is more delicate.  The act of making a full swing is physical enough to block out peripheral chatter.

The rudest thing I've ever seen on a tee box was by Jumbo Ozaki, who used to have a habit of walking up and standing behind some players who were hitting in front of him while they were still holding their finish.  They'd have to awkwardly find their tee and walk around him back to their bags.

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