Jump to content
Xunzi

Black wedges?

Recommended Posts

Just curious to know if:

1) You like or dislike black (or other non-traditional colored) wedges that have become more popular in recent years?

2) Do you find a game advantage / disadvantage with black vs steel?

3) Do you use black wedges only for certain shots / lies / conditions? 


Personally, I favor matte / satin irons and wedges to avoid glare in the sun, which also goes for black clubs, but the choice between satin / black seems like a purely aesthetic one, but I'd be curious to know if somebody has a different view.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sign up (or log in) today! It's free (and you won't see this ad anymore)!

Sign up (or log in) today! It's free (and you won't see this ad anymore)!

I usually have sunglasses on so the glare, if any, doesn't bother me.

I have some black oxide irons that look sweet and I love playing them.  The finish was one of the reasons I bought them.  The wedges are a satin finish and they don't bother me either.

I have a set of Copper Eye2's that I polished up and they were so bright but they didn't bother me while playing.  Other came over to check out what was so shiny. 

I don't think color or finish have any advantages or disadvantages to them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

My 60° Vokey wedge is black. It's black because, well, it's the only lob wedge we had in stock at that time. I don't like it or dislike it any more than any other wedge, although I can find it easily in my bag.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

No performance advantage - I like satin or black but black is cool.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

1 hour ago, Xunzi said:

1) You like or dislike black (or other non-traditional colored) wedges that have become more popular in recent years?

I've got a set of 3 black oxide wedges, and I like them. Less glare, and they just look nice to my eye. I love the look of the Idea Pro MB Black irons that Adams had a while back, my local pro has them and they look excellent with green and white paintfill.

1 hour ago, Xunzi said:

2) Do you find a game advantage / disadvantage with black vs steel?

In terms of the material itself, the base composition of the iron is identical to what would be otherwise. The only difference is the finish itself. In many gases the black is a finish that's pretty similar to the blued steel found in rifles and handguns. I will say that I do prefer wedges and irons that aren't chromed, generally speaking, since they will feel slightly softer. With Mizuno irons I've never tried them with the chrome stripped, but the Titleist MB's feel quite nice and soft when it is stripped since I owned a set of those at one point (716 MB's). For wedges I've always had "black oxide" or "raw" type finishes, just because they feel a little bit softer and I personally like the appearance of them. 

One thing to be careful of, that can put you at a disadvantage if you're negligent, is that the black oxide or raw finish wedges are more susceptible to rust. Rust will reduce the amount of spin your wedges can produce if it's on the face of the club, but it usually shakes off in a few shots or can be scrubbed off if you left the clubs wet and had some oxidation. The Ping "Rustique" wedges I used to have were specifically supposed to rust as a way of giving them color, but you had to keep the face and grooves clean (frequent play or scrubbing it with a brush occasionally would handle it).

1 hour ago, Xunzi said:

3) Do you use black wedges only for certain shots / lies / conditions? 

No, the performance of the wedge is identical. The only differences, depending on specifically which finishes you're looking at, are that the black is darker (and looks better, in my opinion), and the black could feel slightly softer than a satin wedge depending on if there is a plating on the satin finish like they do with chromed irons and if the black wedges are left mostly raw or not.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

I have some oil can wedges for no reason other than that they look cool. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

So apart from the indirect difference that could come from raw vs chromed clubs, it seems like everybody agrees it's just a look thing. I think what spurred my question was a video on youtube - might have been Rick Shiels - who said that he preferred black for his lob wedges specifically, which I thought was interesting so I was speculating what the reason could be. I could potentially see how black provides a greater contrast against the sand (especially the light type) for bunker shots, or vice versa, how satin or chrome would provide more contrast in the deep rough (or when playing night golf :-D) so increasing confidence at address but even that seems a bit like a stretch. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

28 minutes ago, Xunzi said:

So apart from the indirect difference that could come from raw vs chromed clubs, it seems like everybody agrees it's just a look thing. I think what spurred my question was a video on youtube - might have been Rick Shiels - who said that he preferred black for his lob wedges specifically, which I thought was interesting so I was speculating what the reason could be. I could potentially see how black provides a greater contrast against the sand (especially the light type) for bunker shots, or vice versa, how satin or chrome would provide more contrast in the deep rough (or when playing night golf :-D) so increasing confidence at address but even that seems a bit like a stretch. 

I think it's a matter of style - now if you ask shiny v. satin, I have a strong preference as to satin - I don't like shine. Give me dull industrial, flat black or satin.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Many specialty clubs are Black Anodized  Steel these days. Not that long ago, the new thing was BE (Berylium Copper (or however you spell it). Those were FUGLY and I hated them when doing QC for Acushnet. Not to mention they are probably toxic.  ( I do not really know that). Just about all (or at least many) of  the new hybrids are black including the face and sole. It has been stated that folks used to allow the BE wedges to intentionally rust to give them more "bite".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

1 hour ago, Hacker James said:

Not to mention they are probably toxic.

PING stopped using the material because it created hazardous conditions in their factories for the workers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

3 hours ago, jamo said:

I have some oil can wedges for no reason other than that they look cool. 

I have these too, I like the look.  I really doubt that there's any advantage to be gained.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

@Xunzi I play black colored wedges and I prefer them due to the contrast against a white ball.  It just sets up nicely to the eye

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

The one down side is after they have seen a fair amount of action the soles seem to wear more. I know its just the black coating wearing and it doesnt affect how they play, just looks untidy.

May also be as mine are only Wilson 1200's :-(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now




×

Important Information

Welcome to TST! Signing up is free, and you'll see fewer ads and can talk with fellow golf enthusiasts! By using TST, you agree to our Terms of Use, our Privacy Policy, and our Guidelines.