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People just don't "go to sleep" anymore

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I’d been falling asleep to “Family Guy” but Netflix no longer plays it so now I let Alexa pick some classical or Jazz music for me...

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I used to be bad about watching tv and staring at my phone while I was lying in bed getting ready to go to sleep. I started having a lot of issues with actually falling asleep once we turned everything off...sometimes taking hours for me to actually go to sleep. Recently, I started plugging my phone up before I rock my daughter and not touching it anymore. That alone has helped TREMENDOUSLY! We do still watch a little tv but that doesn't seem to bother me like the phone did.

Edited by TN94z

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I typically fall asleep on the couch with the lights and TV on but wake up soon after.  At that point its up to bed with the lights off and no TV or other devices on.  

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For me, it doesn't matter whether a TV or a radio is on or off.  No matter what, when my head hits the pillow, I am out within a minute.  I get my usual 7 hours a sleep and I am good to go.

I can't fall asleep easily when I am sitting.  But when I lay down, I am off to the dream land within a minute no matter how light or dark, loud or quiet the room is.  Funny thing though, I don't recall any dreams.  I am not sure I even dream at all.  I know they say everyone dreams, but I can't remember the last time I had a dream that I can remember when I woke up.  It's been over 10 years.

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On 2/20/2018 at 9:39 AM, NJpatbee said:

I typically fall asleep on the couch with the lights and TV on but wake up soon after.  At that point its up to bed with the lights off and no TV or other devices on.  

Oh man! I hate falling asleep on the couch in front of the TV. It could be 4AM and I conked out about midnight, but my body doesn't seem to want to give me credit for those 4 hours! It's like I stayed up till 4AM! And if if I try to get up 7, it's like I got 3 hours of sleep.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           That's why I turn off the TV, the lights, and everything else before I go to bed. The only time I like a little "white noise" is during the Summer when the fan is blowing air past me. It feels good.

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I was listening to an interesting podcast interview with an expert on depression. Part of the podcast went into quality of sleep. Lack of sleep is known to cause weight gain and depression. Blue light is known to reduce melatonin production in the body, which is what causes us to get sleepy. Even sleeping in off-times can cause high levels of stress and weight gain. They found that people who work the third shift at factors, even healthy people, have higher levels of stress and depression.

To maximize the healthy benefits of sleeping.

  • No lights on in the bedroom after sundown, or at least no blue-light.
  • Limiting the use of artificial light after sundown is beneficial to help the body get ready for bed.
  • Try to sleep more in-time with sunset and sunrise. Try to get a decent amount of sunlight in the morning (30 minutes). Even on a cloudy day the sun emits 5000k on the color temperature spectrum. Also, it helps the body produce Vitamin D.

 

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On 2/18/2018 at 7:41 PM, upndown21 said:

Moving a tv out of our bedroom was one of the best things I have ever done.

Same. Dark room, no electronics, with some white noise from a fan. 

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I always watch tv before going to sleep but i turn it off the first time i close my eyes beyond blinking time.
If i´m tired i just go to sleep 5 minutes after i turned on the tv, if I´m not, just see something boring and that´s it.  

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On 2/18/2018 at 11:24 AM, billchao said:

My wife likes to fall asleep with the TV on and I can't stand it. Usually I don't go to bed until after she falls asleep and I can turn it off. If I leave it on, it will wake me up in the middle of the night.

That's exactly me too.  My GF will also fall asleep with a book in her hands.  I have to specifically bring by reading or TV show to a conclusion before I can go to sleep.  I watch to actually watch something specific, not just to have it on.  And I'll worry about it being on all night if I don't turn it off.

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Generally watch TV till 10pm then go to bed. However with 2 boys under 5 years old it oftens ends up with them in bed by 7:30-8pm then me and the mrs are knackered by 9 after doing the dishes etc. and end up going to bed.

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I highly recommend the Joe Rogan podcast episode with Matthew Walker. He is a neuroscientist who studies sleep and sleep quality.

He made this statement,

Quote

The number of people of who can survive on six hours of sleep or less, with out showing any impairment, rounded to a whole number and expressed as a percent of the population is zero.

The biggest issue is people don't know they are sleep deprived when they are sleep deprived.

He made a great point. From a survival standpoint, sleep doesn't really make sense. It doesn't seem to fit with surviving against predators. Your body paralyzes your muscles. You are not aware of what is going on around you. So, there needs to be some big advantages.

They found that if you are sleep deprived your body produces the hormone that makes you want to eat more and it reduces the hormone that suppresses hunger. When you sleep matters as well. They found that people who work 3rd shifts have higher chances of getting cancer.

There is a study on the time changes. They found a 21% increase in cardiac disease when the clock springs forward and a 21% decrease when the clock falls back one hour. So, one hour, once a year, can have a pretty big influence.

Edited by saevel25

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4 hours ago, saevel25 said:

I highly recommend the Joe Rogan podcast episode with Matthew Walker. He is a neuroscientist who studies sleep and sleep quality.

He made this statement,

The biggest issue is people don't know they are sleep deprived when they are sleep deprived.

He made a great point. From a survival standpoint, sleep doesn't really make sense. It doesn't seem to fit with surviving against predators. Your body paralyzes your muscles. You are not aware of what is going on around you. So, there needs to be some big advantages.

They found that if you are sleep deprived your body produces the hormone that makes you want to eat more and it reduces the hormone that suppresses hunger. When you sleep matters as well. They found that people who work 3rd shifts have higher chances of getting cancer.

There is a study on the time changes. They found a 21% increase in cardiac disease when the clock springs forward and a 21% decrease when the clock falls back one hour. So, one hour, once a year, can have a pretty big influence.

Wouldn't it also then stand to reason that the humans (and our ancestors) who could get all of the benefits of sleep in less time would be selected for, for the only reason that they spent less time vulnerable and paralyzed?

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I generally lie in bed reading a book or something similar until I'm tired enough to just pass out when I hit the pillow. Otherwise I end up just lying there until it happens, which could be 2 minutes or could be 2 hours.

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3 hours ago, jamo said:

Wouldn't it also then stand to reason that the humans (and our ancestors) who could get all of the benefits of sleep in less time would be selected for, for the only reason that they spent less time vulnerable and paralyzed?

Not sure. Our ancestor's sleeping patterns were also aligned with sunrise and sunset. It could be that the balance point was 8 hours. To little and the body suffers from it. 

Lack of sleep can cause a lot of negatives that probably weighted evolution in finding the 8 hours of sleep point. 

 

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Joe Rogan just had a neuroscientist on his podcast talking about this very topic. Very interesting.  

8 hours ago, saevel25 said:

I highly recommend the Joe Rogan podcast episode with Matthew Walker. He is a neuroscientist who studies sleep and sleep quality.

He made this statement,

The biggest issue is people don't know they are sleep deprived when they are sleep deprived.

He made a great point. From a survival standpoint, sleep doesn't really make sense. It doesn't seem to fit with surviving against predators. Your body paralyzes your muscles. You are not aware of what is going on around you. So, there needs to be some big advantages.

They found that if you are sleep deprived your body produces the hormone that makes you want to eat more and it reduces the hormone that suppresses hunger. When you sleep matters as well. They found that people who work 3rd shifts have higher chances of getting cancer.

There is a study on the time changes. They found a 21% increase in cardiac disease when the clock springs forward and a 21% decrease when the clock falls back one hour. So, one hour, once a year, can have a pretty big influence.

Ah, beat me to it lol. 

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