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Vinsk

Is It Legal For DeChambeau To Use Compass/Protractor?

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2 hours ago, boogielicious said:

I was in the last class in my High School to learn to use a slide rule. Does that make me old? :-P

My high school science teacher actually refused to take the time to show us how to use it. Said it was obsolete (1970s). 

And I think I’m old. So, yeah. 

But on topic, is what BD doing really obsolete tech for what he’s trying to do, even if it’s within the rules?

Edited by Missouri Swede

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2 hours ago, boogielicious said:

I was in the last class in my High School to learn to use a slide rule. Does that make me old? :-P

The first affordable electronic calculators from TI didn't show up until at least 10 years after I graduated, so lots of students used slide rules after me.... I guess that makes me ancient?

I can't see any breach here, unless it just a breach of rational behavior. :no:

Edited by Fourputt

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18 hours ago, Golfingdad said:

I was making the same mistake for awhile as well, however, you are thinking of the wrong type of compass.  He was using one of these:

empire-compasses-27030-64_1000.jpg

Not one of these:

51v0rmRbnmL._SX355_.jpg

Yupp..

Just a guess but seems like he is using it to estimate a 'safe zone' for landing (using known distance like edge of green to pin) to compare to his shot zone on his yardage book. If so, then he can do that upfront as pin sheets are available. Seems unnecessary to do it on course during the round. 

Don't know the legality but it does not seem like something that gives him unfair advantage. 

Edited by GolfLug

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1 hour ago, GolfLug said:

Yupp..

Just a guess but seems like he is using it to estimate a 'safe zone' for landing (using known distance like edge of green to pin) to compare to his shot zone on his yardage book. If so, then he can do that upfront as pin sheets are available. Seems unnecessary to do it on course during the round. 

Don't know the legality but it does not seem like something that gives him unfair advantage. 

The PGA tour is very likely different, however, any time I’ve played in a tournament that was fancy enough to hand out pin sheets, they only gave them to you on the first tee.

Obviously not something that gives him ANY kind of advantage because whatever they rule applies to everybody - this isn’t a Casey Martin type thing.

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3 hours ago, Golfingdad said:

The PGA tour is very likely different, however, any time I’ve played in a tournament that was fancy enough to hand out pin sheets, they only gave them to you on the first tee.

Obviously not something that gives him ANY kind of advantage because whatever they rule applies to everybody - this isn’t a Casey Martin type thing.

 

You can get pin sheets at the receptions of pretty much all of the better public places I play. 

I only use them on courses I didn’t play before or maybe only once before just to know where the center of the green is in relation to the pin on longer approach shots. 

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It has been reported that the PGA, after consulting with the USGA, have allowed DeChambeau to continue using that compass (a "bow" compass is the correct term). He said he uses it only to check the actual pin position when he is on the green. When he knows the correct location, he can assess the borrow by looking at the book he carries with a diagram of each green. The compass is apparently not used to actually measure the borrow at all.

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6 hours ago, Rulesman said:

It has been reported that the PGA, after consulting with the USGA, have allowed DeChambeau to continue using that compass (a "bow" compass is the correct term). He said he uses it only to check the actual pin position when he is on the green. When he knows the correct location, he can assess the borrow by looking at the book he carries with a diagram of each green. The compass is apparently not used to actually measure the borrow at all.

That would be the commercial enterprise known as the PGA Tour. 😉

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It could be immensely useful if you know the direction to Rae's Creek so you can factor in its pull on a putt and compensate.

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I thought I had read that it was going to be allowed but I guess I was reading someone's opinion and not the official ruling.

I'm not terribly surprised at the ruling; I don't see a lot of difference between using the compass to figure out the "true pin location" on the green and using a range finder to find the "true location" of the pin from where the player is standing.

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In regards to  the USGA’s attempt to minimize any DQ or penalty to BD and to respectfully deny his use of the compass, perhaps they simply could’ve said, “Hey man..quit being a douche.” 

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10 minutes ago, Vinsk said:

In regards to  the USGA’s attempt to minimize any DQ or penalty to BD and to respectfully deny his use of the compass, perhaps they simply could’ve said, “Hey man..quit being a douche.” 

Upvoted for making me laugh.

My guess is it’s also due in part to them just not wanting the potential for more people trying this nonsense and just slowing everything down.  

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53 minutes ago, krupa said:

I'm not terribly surprised at the ruling; I don't see a lot of difference between using the compass to figure out the "true pin location" on the green and using a range finder to find the "true location" of the pin from where the player is standing. 

I'm very surprised.  Using a compass is slightly more efficient than using a couple of pencils, but it's nothing compared to allowing the use of pin sheets and yardage books.

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seriously what aspect of the game do they think they are protecting? If you have a tour yardage book, laser mapped green book and a pin sheet what advantage do you get from the compass? 

If the argument is that judging the distance is part of the game fine. Say not stepping it off, no yardage books. If reading the greens is an integral part of the game then say no green maps and no aim point. 

At the end of the day I see this as missing the point. The best in game can stick it close from anywhere. If they hit their lines they will make a bunch of putts. Really the game is a bout execution not knowing that the pin is 4' from the edge or that the slope is 2.5 vs 2.7 deg.

Either let them have all the mapping and measuring they want or take it all away. I don't care which (although NONE might speed up the game).

 

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7 minutes ago, criley4way said:

If reading the greens is an integral part of the game then say no green maps and no aim point.

AimPoint is reading the greens.

And their point is that it’s an artificial device.

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It's totally legal. He won't be arrested for using it.

I've never been arrested for bringing brand new wedges to the machine shop for a little groove work.

As a matter of fact, if you don't mind going through golf balls a little faster, I highly recommend it.

 

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