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Diece

Journey to the Mackenzie Tour: One Amateur's Pipe Dream

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2 minutes ago, Diece said:

So 10 clients each paying 1k doesnt make 10k?

Damn.

It’s not the math that’s concerning. It’s the complete lack of a realistic plan.

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1 hour ago, iacas said:

It’s not the math that’s concerning. It’s the complete lack of a realistic plan.

Oh to be 22 years old and think that earning $120k a year working part time is easy just because I want to do it...  ;-)

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@Diece If it was so easy to make 10K+ a month, why is over 50% of the planet living in poverty struggling to eke out two square meals a day.  I think you need to be realistic.  Like I said, if you have a niche skill or product, you can earn decent money.  But earning so much with so little work reeks of optimism.  I have no doubt some people have managed it, but please look into their story and understand why, before you make assumptions about it being easy.  Trust me, getting even one person to pay you 1K a month for consulting on photography is difficult enough.

With regards to rest, you may be able to sleep anywhere, but rest is about more than just sleep.  It is about things like having a relaxed place to have a decent bath, stretch out, stuff like that.  That is not practical long term in a van.  A house is the only solution.  I see you are considering staying with your dad and then doing Florida in the winter.  A much better option than B.C.

On to your golf game.  How are you finding the practice and approximately how many hours a day are you able to put into it.  It may not apply to you, but the adage about it taking 10K hours of practice to build a pro level skill would probably be pretty accurate for most people.

With regards to a coach, have you found anybody, and if not, why.  It is a necessity to have a good coach.  Very few professionals succeed without one.

Look forward to more feedback on your game

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3 hours ago, Diece said:

So 10 clients each paying 1k doesnt make 10k?

Damn.

Not after taxes.

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9 hours ago, pganapathy said:

@Diece If it was so easy to make 10K+ a month, why is over 50% of the planet living in poverty struggling to eke out two square meals a day.  I think you need to be realistic.  Like I said, if you have a niche skill or product, you can earn decent money.  But earning so much with so little work reeks of optimism.  I have no doubt some people have managed it, but please look into their story and understand why, before you make assumptions about it being easy.  Trust me, getting even one person to pay you 1K a month for consulting on photography is difficult enough.

With regards to rest, you may be able to sleep anywhere, but rest is about more than just sleep.  It is about things like having a relaxed place to have a decent bath, stretch out, stuff like that.  That is not practical long term in a van.  A house is the only solution.  I see you are considering staying with your dad and then doing Florida in the winter.  A much better option than B.C.

On to your golf game.  How are you finding the practice and approximately how many hours a day are you able to put into it.  It may not apply to you, but the adage about it taking 10K hours of practice to build a pro level skill would probably be pretty accurate for most people.

With regards to a coach, have you found anybody, and if not, why.  It is a necessity to have a good coach.  Very few professionals succeed without one.

Look forward to more feedback on your game

Everyone assume I think it's easy. Is it easy? Nah. Is it really that hard? Nah. Not as hard as people think. I don't look at it as hard work because it's not. Working 14 hours doing manual labour, that's hard work. An online business? Not really.

Anyway.

I don't think I'm going to B.C, my dad brought up some good points and I think the Florida option is better. 

In regards to my game, the season is just starting. My main focus is short-game and putting + refreshing my brain on the swings fundamentals. I'm spending about 2 and a half hours each day working on putting and short game right now. I need to get a membership though, I don't have a course membership as my plan was to move to B.C and now that I'm not I have to figure out where exactly I'm going to play out of. 

Last year I worked just shy of full-time in the restaurant at the golf course and I probably played everyday + practiced for at least 2 hours. Peek season I was doing 36 holes a day, which was when I started to get good and shot under par or par. 

The practice I've done so far this season has gone well. It's sort of tough to gauge being so early but my putting stroke feels better this year, my focus is better and I'm beginning to understand "how" to practice. I'm spending less time screwing around with crappy focus.

I didn't have a coach last year and this year I'm starting the search. I've been reluctant to find a coach because I haven't found anyone I can fully trust and feel good about yet. I read a book by Butch Harmon on golf and I'm looking for a coach sort of like that, I like Butch's philosophy regarding the game and his no bullshit attitude. I am not a very technical person, I'd like a coach that doesn't stuff mechanics down my throat. I read Sam Snead's Education Of A Golfer last year and approaching the game the way Sam Snead did was one of the factors that contributed to my decent rounds last year. The years prior I made the game too technical and mechanical. Snead said that he learned the game entirely by feel and didn't try to overcomplicate stuff. Although this year, I need to tighten up my motion, if you look at some videos of my swing I have a pretty pronounced over the top action which I will be eradicating this year. My swing thoughts and movements have gotten me to where I am now but now I need to make some modifications.

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26 minutes ago, Diece said:

Everyone assume I think it's easy. Is it easy? Nah. Is it really that hard? Nah. Not as hard as people think. I don't look at it as hard work because it's not. Working 14 hours doing manual labour, that's hard work. An online business? Not really.

Believe me, it is that hard.  Actually, it is harder.  When you look at the entire planet, less than 10 percent of all people achieve that income.  Do not assume that online work is not as hard.  Just because you are sitting behind a desk and doing it, doesn't make it easy.

Anyway, let us ignore that topic, because you seem to be getting very defensive about it.

With regards to your game.  I assume you intend to exercise/practice/play on the course for nothing less than 6 hours a day.  If not, I don't believe this is going to work.  The reason I say that is because fitness counts and talent is no substitute for hard work.

Also, are you practicing with a goal or just practicing for the sake of it.  Goal oriented practice is the key to improving.  Mindlessly pounding balls on the range is no real help, except grooving a swing, which without a coach could potentially be ingraining bad habits and making it harder to change later.  Get a coach first and then groove a swing around the correct fundamentals.

It is good that you have decided to do a couple of months with your parents and then a couple of months in Florida.  Year round practice is the key to improving quickly.

Also, have you analyzed to game to understand where you need to spend how much time practicing.  If not, figure that out and plan accordingly.

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47 minutes ago, pganapathy said:

Believe me, it is that hard.  Actually, it is harder.  When you look at the entire planet, less than 10 percent of all people achieve that income.  Do not assume that online work is not as hard.  Just because you are sitting behind a desk and doing it, doesn't make it easy.

Anyway, let us ignore that topic, because you seem to be getting very defensive about it.

With regards to your game.  I assume you intend to exercise/practice/play on the course for nothing less than 6 hours a day.  If not, I don't believe this is going to work.  The reason I say that is because fitness counts and talent is no substitute for hard work.

Also, are you practicing with a goal or just practicing for the sake of it.  Goal oriented practice is the key to improving.  Mindlessly pounding balls on the range is no real help, except grooving a swing, which without a coach could potentially be ingraining bad habits and making it harder to change later.  Get a coach first and then groove a swing around the correct fundamentals.

It is good that you have decided to do a couple of months with your parents and then a couple of months in Florida.  Year round practice is the key to improving quickly.

Also, have you analyzed to game to understand where you need to spend how much time practicing.  If not, figure that out and plan accordingly.

Most people are lazy f***s that are content with being average. 

What I find interesting is how most peoples rebuttals to my words is "you know how hard that is? or how much work it requires?"

As if that's a real reason not to do something that you desire.

I guess when you want to accomplish great things, you don't see things as hard work, you see it as living. It's as much a part of you as breathing and it's deeply rewarding. What's so hard about that? 

It sure will be interesting when I play on the Mackenzie Tour (and win) to look back at this thread.

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5 minutes ago, Diece said:

Most people are lazy f***s that are content with being average. 

What I find interesting is how most peoples rebuttals to my words is "you know how hard that is? or how much work it requires?"

As if that's a real reason not to do something that you desire.

I guess when you want to accomplish great things, you don't see things as hard work, you see it as living. It's as much a part of you as breathing and it's deeply rewarding. What's so hard about that? 

It sure will be interesting when I play on the Mackenzie Tour (and win) to look back at this thread.

Dude, you don't have a plan. You have a dream, and a pipe dream at that.

You've not actually seemed to DO anything except talk. You are moving to BC, and then a day later, to Florida. That's not a plan. That's just… making stuff up as you go.

It is hard to make $120k/year working 10 hours a week. If it wasn't, way, way more people would be doing it.

This discussion is a joke. You may very well win a Mackenzie Tour event some day… but I'd take some pretty long odds on that bet and bet against it and feel pretty content that my money was safe.


You want to convince people that you have a good plan?

MAKE A GOOD PLAN and then execute on that plan. Stop telling people "oh, it's easier than you think to earn $120k/year working 10 hours a week." You come off as foolish when you say things like that, partly because you have no idea what other people are actually thinking, and partly because you're naïve as heck.

You've not posted your golf swing. You've not posted scores. You've not talked about any plans, any learning you've done about reading my book or anyone's book, any pros you've worked with, any insights you've gained into learning what it takes… nothing.

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1 minute ago, iacas said:

Dude, you don't have a plan. You have a dream, and a pipe dream at that.

You've not actually seemed to DO anything except talk. You are moving to BC, and then a day later, to Florida. That's not a plan. That's just… making stuff up as you go.

It is hard to make $120k/year working 10 hours a week. If it wasn't, way, way more people would be doing it.

This discussion is a joke. You may very well win a Mackenzie Tour event some day… but I'd take some pretty long odds on that bet and bet against it and feel pretty content that my money was safe.

A plan?

How can you plan out something like this?

Things change.

Have you ever planned for a trip and then when you actually go on it, you find out that you have to change your plans?

Or what about when you go to college, plan for a career in one thing and end up in something completely different.

It's not.

And you'd lose your money. 😎

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13 minutes ago, iacas said:

Dude, you don't have a plan. You have a dream, and a pipe dream at that.

You've not actually seemed to DO anything except talk. You are moving to BC, and then a day later, to Florida. That's not a plan. That's just… making stuff up as you go.

It is hard to make $120k/year working 10 hours a week. If it wasn't, way, way more people would be doing it.

This discussion is a joke. You may very well win a Mackenzie Tour event some day… but I'd take some pretty long odds on that bet and bet against it and feel pretty content that my money was safe.


You want to convince people that you have a good plan?

MAKE A GOOD PLAN and then execute on that plan. Stop telling people "oh, it's easier than you think to earn $120k/year working 10 hours a week." You come off as foolish when you say things like that, partly because you have no idea what other people are actually thinking, and partly because you're naïve as heck.

You've not posted your golf swing. You've not posted scores. You've not talked about any plans, any learning you've done about reading my book or anyone's book, any pros you've worked with, any insights you've gained into learning what it takes… nothing.

Alright, the points after the line break, I respect that...

I re looked over the thread and I can see how it comes across as all talk. Luckily I kept decent records of my improvement last year and also personal notes on what I'm learning, I'll put up some of that.

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When I was 19 I ran off to Miami, Florida in the middle of winter, from St. Louis.  To play golf every day, or practice every day.  I had been a hot shot in high school and I wanted to see if I had what it takes to become a touring pro.  

I soon found out I didn't have it.  Not even close.  Though I did go on to college golf on a full athletic scholarship and played in two NCAA Championships.

When I'm on my deathbed, with my favorite wedge beside me, at least I can say, "I gave it a shot."  No regrets. 

So Diece, enjoy the journey and be philosophical about the results.

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32 minutes ago, iacas said:

I give up.

This topic is pointless.

This is sounding like the bet with Seinfeld and Kramer on whether Kramer would build levels in his apartment.

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So @iacas had a good idea on a post where he said that I haven't really shown that I've done ANYTHING in regards to this goal, which when I looked over my thread again I can agree with him.

So I figure I should probably elaborate on my "golfing" history.

I started playing at the very young age of 3. We had a large backyard and I used to spend hours practicing, my dad dug makeshift holes and I'd play them as par 3's, par 4's and par 5's. I have vivid memories of teeing up my driver from the far side yard and hitting it out towards the hole that was at the very back of our property. That hole was a par 5. 

From 3 to about 8 I did not take the game super seriously. I loved practicing in the backyard and did that when I felt like it but it was not something I did everyday. I'd say I did it probably twice a week maybe a little more.

When I was 8 my dad put me into a junior golf clinic and I was a star but the teacher was a dick. He got very angry with me during play for not following some silly rule. (seriously it was something like you couldn't ground a club in the hazard (not sand trap). He also was boozing on the range and that was not a very pleasant experience.

I didn't play much after that. 

Then came Grade 7, I was a terrible student and frequently was in trouble at school. Forging my moms signature and stuff like that. Summer of Grade 7 I got re-introduced back into the game and became very close with this old club fitter at the course I played at. He used to pick me up and drive me home everyday, as well as teach me about the game and what he knew. 

I questioned the validity of his methods though, every bad shot he said was the result of moving the head. He used to drill into me to keep my head still, sometimes I'd mess with him and purposely move my head to which he would sometimes say "see what happens when you don't move your head."

I can't fault him though.

He was a very nice guy and he took me under his wing.

After that summer I started to get somewhat-serious into golf. Ben Hogan was my favourite player and I used to study him. Then in summer of Grade 8 I got a membership at a prestigious club and worked hard on my game. I sort of felt outclassed though as the other kids my age were much better than me. I was a very small kid and I was going through some shit at home, I used to spend time at the course just to get away. I liked the game but I never really cared too much about getting really good. My handicap was around a 13.

At this time I entered into some tournaments where I played okay, I think I was middle of the pack and I won my division for our clubs club championships.

Going into Grade 9 everyone thought I was destined to compete and play golf and I thought so too that is until I became friends with one of the weirder kids in the back of the bus and he introduced me to the wonderful world of video games. I was hooked and I gave up golf for the entire duration of high school. This is probably my biggest regret because had I of kept playing I would probably be close to pro by now but I didn't and wasted a ton of time.

When I graduated high school, things at home got worse and I ended up living with my brother. He wouldn't let me play video games like I was so I ended up picking golf back up again. This was my first super serious year of playing.

I was very dedicated.

I rode my bike to the course everyday and I was usually late for work because I'd rather practice. This was when I started to understand the game. I think during this time I shot par for the first time for 9 holes. I don't remember what my scores for 18 holes were but I think it was between 79 and 82. I played on a junior tour and did okay. I finished slightly ahead of middle of the pack and I had one really, really good round. I shot a 77 with a f***ing 12 on a par 5. 

That hole pissed me off so much, I hit the perfect drive, so good that it carried the landing spot and went into the woods. It was a blind shot so I had no clue where the ball was but I couldn't find it, the guys I was playing with said it should have been in a perfect position. Well it wasn't. I had to take a drop and I was so mad I proceeded to duff the shot, chunk it, thinned it over the green, bladed my chip, putt off the green, I was a complete mess. I was so mad. Then the next hole I birdied...and the next I birdied. The winner shot a 69 and I was so mad that I didn't shoot better than a 77.

Once that season was over though, I got kicked out of my brothers and had to go back to my moms. I picked up video games AGAIN and wasted more time. When the summer came around I decided to move to Montreal and I didn't play at all.

Montreal enchanted me at first but as the months wore on and I came to the 8 month mark I decided to head back home. Coincidently winter was just ending and I used my good reputation at the prestigious golf course I played at when I was in Grade 8 to get a job there on the grounds crew. I hated that job but it allowed me to play golf as much as I wanted and this was again where I started to take the game somewhat seriously. This year was where I started to see some rewards for my labour. I started out not being able to break 90 but as I worked on my game I got better and better. Breaking 80 and eventually shooting my lowest round (at the time) of 76 from the tips. I also remember playing in a friendly match play against one of the better golfers and I came VERY close to beating him. I think he edged me out on the 18th hole but regardless I was happy of my performance. I also came very close to breaking par for the first time for 9 holes. I had a 5 foot putt for birdie and missed it.

So you'd think after a successful year, going from a 15 handicap at the start of the year to a 6 I'd have kept playing?

Nope.

The next year I never touched a club.

Then once that year was over I spent a lot of time reflecting on my life and what I wanted to do. I thought back to my time in golf and what I had achieved, something was telling me to keep pushing and don't waste my talents.

So that's what I did.

2017 came and the copywriting business that I had worked on during the winter fell by the wayside because my sights were focused 100% on golf.

Starting the year I was around a 18 handicap, I stunk. I was so mad at the scores I was posting. After about a month of busting my ass I finally broke 80, I remember texting my brother (a different one) about having shot 79. I was ecstatic.

After shooting 79 I decided that I needed to start playing from the back tees and making the course as hard as possible. My scores went up at first but then they started to lower, I was shooting around 77-78 on a regular basis. I was really busting my ass out there, I worked on the grounds crew so I'd work an 8 hour day and then golf and practice the rest of the day. The owner of the course got really mad at me one day because I was still at the course even during the night (I was putting). 

When I worked that job I had the wonderful task of digging a trench where the dirt was nothing but rock. This was around July and we were at the hottest point of the summer, I'm digging this stupid f***ing trench for sprinklers and then driving home, sleeping for an hour and going to practice.

Thankfully, my hard work was paying off. I broke par for 9 holes on a regular basis, my best 9 hole score being 3 under and I also shot a personal best of 73 and a 74 pretty much back to back. My handicap at this time was realistically around a 6-7. 

I also played in some bigger tournaments but I f***ing stunk. I shot a 93, 79, 83, 76 and a 89. I was so bad in tournament play. I just couldn't get my mind right and I made so many stupid mistakes.

Around the end of July I was getting tired of digging the damn trench, I hated the course too because they were always cutting corners and it was too damn busy. I could only play two days of the week (and I paid for a membership too.)

I started looking at other jobs and ended up grabbing a serving position at a semi-private club that was just a few minutes from my place. I didn't really play a ton during this time, I was sort of burned out on the game. I took a week off in August and I worked a lot too, more than full time hours. I only started working on my game once the season died down, I don't remember what I was shooting at this time I just remember it being the beginning of November and I was practicing on the course, I was hitting two irons and I was hitting the ball so poorly I felt like snapping every damn club in the bag.

Which I did but not at that time. It was around December and I drove to an empty field, filled with rage for having played so poorly in my tournaments and fed up with my dream that I snapped everything. Driver, wedge, putter, everything. It was all gone. I thought I was done. I sold my bag which I had gotten for shooting 76 and "killed the dream."

This only lasted a bit though because I soon found myself back into the game once the next golf season came. That start of 2018 I re-purchased a set of clubs and a new bag that was identical to my old one. 

I stuck with the job as a server at the semi-private course and worked full-time + practiced / played whenever I got the chance. I started 2018 a 10 handicap and quickly dropped to a 5 where I plateaued. I was really busting my ass, working 8 hours and practicing right after or working an entire day and practicing putting at night under the floodlights. 

After being a 5 handicap for a little over a month I began to drop again, going from a 5 to a 1/2. I also posted some of my best scores to date, which was a 71 and 72 at my course, a 69 at an away course and a 71 at a championship away course, 7100 yards, playing from tips. I played some other away courses and shot an 80, 81 and I think a 79. 

To put into perspective how hard I was practicing my game, I'd spend minimal 45 minutes on putting everyday. Another 45 on chipping, about 2 baskets of balls on wedge control and then I'd go play and If I had the time I'd play 36 holes. 

I owe that course a lot because it taught me how to think around the course, how to place your shots and I started to understand the mental side of the game. 

I played in 5 tournaments this season and I didn't do that great. At five events, I shot 82, 78, 79, 75 and 85. I bit of an improvement over the prior year but still I missed a lot of shots and I really struggled with the mental side. For the first 2 events I couldn't hit a driver, I was hooking wildly and losing so many balls. I was shooting 82 with 6 penalty strokes. My finest moment in tournament play last year was where I held the lead after 9 holes. I shot 2 under but I blew up on the back 9, finishing with a 75. 

I ended last year on a high note though, I shot a low round for 9 holes which was 3 under and I also shot par for 9 holes without hitting a green (I'm not talking hitting fringes, I'm talking full on missing the green. Bunker shots, etc.)

I made it my goal the beginning of last year that I HAD to break par for 18 holes if I wanted a chance at my dreams, which I did not only once but multiple times. Now going into 2019, I'd like to get to a + handicap (I'm a 0.9 right now). If I can get close to that level, I would say I'm on a good trajectory to reaching pro.

But I need to get my act together this year. I need to polish up a lot of my game + philosophies regarding the game. This year I'm going to work even harder than last year and I will become a + golfer before it's over. I also would like to win a lesser event.

Now I guess you guys have some proof that I'm not just blowing smoke up your asses. I am VERY serious about this dream and I've already put in a considerable amount of time and investment into achieving it.

I will do whatever it takes to reach my goal. 

In my next post I'm going to pull some journal entires about golf and things I'm learning from 2015 (if I can find the journal), 2017 and 2018. I'm also going to write about my trip to see a Mackenzie Tour event last year and what I learned.

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This is the same clown that told another dreamer (5 handicap at 27 years old) to f$#@ it, just go for it. 

Beside the foul language and atrocious grammar, he’s making it up as he goes. Walter Mitty.

Playing even or 1 under from 6900 yards won’t make a cut on any pro tour. That’s Tour Champions distance. Roll on out 7200 to 7500 and count em up. 

Even a 58 year old fart like me plays 6500-6800 yards. 

This bravado and zero results are a waste. 

Young man, grow up.

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I've mentioned before how I haven't taken many lessons and I don't have a coach which is true, but that doesn't mean that I haven't read a lot about golf and philosophies regarding teaching. Here's a list of some of the books I've read.

 

The Search For The Perfect Swing

This is an interesting book, it's pretty technical and scientific so a lot of it is tough to apply to your own game. The most interesting part of this book was the tests they did on compression, grooves, putting and stances of pro players compared to amateurs. This is what sparked my idea that to play good golf, you need to be in a very consistent starting position. (stance). How can you expect consistency if you aren't addressing the ball the same every time?

Ben Hogan 5 Lessons

The "bible" for golf instruction. I used to live and die by this book when I was younger but now not so much. It's meh. Too technical. The best part of this book was the plane of glass theory, certainly something I use regularly in my practice and swing.

Ben Hogan Power Golf

The "little known" Ben Hogan book which was written before his 5 lessons. I think this book is more valuable, it talks about how to play under different conditions and it goes into detail about how Hogan played short irons and long irons. That was the most interesting part of the book, I learned that short irons should be played differently than long irons. I also learned that having a slightly open stance for short irons helps with control.

Jack Nicklaus Golf My Way

I like this book a lot, I love the parts that talk about the mental game and how to think your way around the course. I also like the parts that Jack talks about how he was taught golf.

Jack Nicklaus The Greatest Game Of All Time

This is MUCH better than Golf My Way, this book talks more about Jacks careers and how he moved up the ranks. The stories are great and give you an insight into what it takes to play pro golf. My favourite part was the beginning Chapters where Jack talks about how he learned golf, how Jack Grout taught him and his approach to tournaments. This is a must have book.

George Knudson The Natural Swing

Meh. I loved this book when I was younger but I never really got better from reading it and applying the principles. Knudson is probably one of my favourite players but his book never really clicked with me.

Harvey Pennick Little Red Book

A decent book, the anecdotes are great and he has some great bite-sized advice to playing better golf. I like how simple Harvey made golf. I remember one part of the book that talks about how the motion you make when you use a trimmer to cut grass is the same one you make in golf "chop the heads off the dandelions."

Byron Nelson Black Book

A good book, even though its relatively short. It's basically a bunch of journal entries and stats that Byron kept of his game. The little bits of wisdom are nice too. My favourite part though was where Byron wrote down that he shot an 84 at a tournament, it made me feel less bad when I shot a high 80 in mine.

Byron Nelson Winning Golf

This book is kind of like Jacks Golf My Way but it's shorter. Byron has some interesting advice in this book but none of it really stuck with me, his main bit of advice was to use the legs.

Butch Harmon The Pro: Lessons About Golf and Life from My Father, Claude Harmon, Sr.

I loved this book. Claude Harmon was one of the few men that Hogan took advice from. This book made me realize that I need a coach and that I need to make the game simpler, not harder. Other parts of the book I enjoyed was where Butch was talking about what it was like to be the swing coach for Tiger and Butch talks about just how much willpower Tiger had. Tiger essentially changed his swing around the peak of his dominance because he wanted it to be better. It was a big commitment and ultimately it payed off, even though at first Woods struggled. I enjoyed learning about how Tiger practiced and the focus he had. He wouldn't leave until the shot was perfect, Butch said. This is an attitude I adopted to my own practice, I won't stop working on something until I perfect it.

Jack Grout 

Not so much a golf instruction book, it reads more like a novel but it's very interesting because it talks about Jacks relationship with Nicklaus and how he coached him. This book made realize what type of relationship I should look for with a coach. Another thing I learned was how to practice and make practice time worth it.

Education Of A Golfer

This is my favourite book I have ever read on golf. Sam Snead's philosophy regarding golf and how he used "feel" to teach him how to play really stuck with me. He also said had he have gotten all tangled up in mechanics and theory he wouldn't have been able to play a lick. This is probably the only golf book that really made a difference with my game. There's not a single part of it that I didn't learn from. I love Knudson, Hogan, Woods but Snead is the guy I resonate the most with. 

34 minutes ago, LMoore said:

This is the same clown that told another dreamer (5 handicap at 27 years old) to f$#@ it, just go for it. 

Beside the foul language and atrocious grammar, he’s making it up as he goes. Walter Mitty.

Playing even or 1 under from 6900 yards won’t make a cut on any pro tour. That’s Tour Champions distance. Roll on out 7200 to 7500 and count em up. 

Even a 58 year old fart like me plays 6500-6800 yards. 

This bravado and zero results are a waste. 

Young man, grow up.

Oh really? I thought shooting par basically means I'm pro...right?

What if I shoot par on a 9100 yard course? That should be good enough right?

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