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Matt Maxey

need wedge advice

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hello all I'm looking to upgrade my wedges and have settled on a set of vokeys. My questions are 1 Is there a a $50 difference in technology between the sm6's and the sm7s? I can buy a new set of sm6s for $100 a club or sm7s for $150 a club i guess im wondering between brand new clubs is there that much of a difference? and my 2nd question is how accurate is the questionnaire on the vokey website? the problem I have is that Im like 2 hours away from anyone that can do a detailed fitting. thanks for the help

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As far as sm6/sm7 I wouldn’t worry about that. Save the $50/club. So are you saying you weren’t fitted for any of your clubs? If you are reluctant to drive the 2hrs to get fitted then the website info is probably better than just buying off a rack. If you were happy with your old wedges then you could always just replicate their specs on your new Vokeys. Obviously the best situation is to be fitted. But I don’t think you’re losing a huge advantage by not doing so. But golf is hard and many feel they want to capitalize on every advantage possible no matter the degree of effect. Cheers!

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1 hour ago, Matt Maxey said:

My questions are 1 Is there a a $50 difference in technology between the sm6's and the sm7s?

It depends on if you need what's offered in the SM7 that isn't in the SM6. SM7 offers a couple of more grind options and the shift in CoG is further than it was in the SM6. I don't know what skill level you are as a player, but these things matter to some people more than others.

1 hour ago, Matt Maxey said:

my 2nd question is how accurate is the questionnaire on the vokey website?

It's bound to be better than buying blind. Bounce and grind combinations can be one of those things that players learn for themselves, but even then some people go through a fitting and learn what they've always used isn't the best setup for them.

In the end I think it comes how you value your time, money, and golf. For some, a custom fitting and the newer technology is well worth it. Others are perfectly happy buying previous model years or second hand and playing with stock options.

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You’re a step ahead of me. I wanted a new 56 and pretty much grabbed a glide 2.0 off the rack and didn’t even look at the dot. It felt right in my hands and having played ping irons for years I know my lie angle I guess. But I had no clue the many grinds etc.... I personally think wedges are all about feel. They are going to be the clubs that should, in theory, be your scoring clubs. I want a club that feels right more than what someone says is right.

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May I ask why you ‘settled’ on a set of Vokeys? Have you hit them on the course/grass? I’m just asking if you’ve tested wedges and settled on Vokeys or if you’re just going by the good reviews? Don’t mean to clutter your decision but Edel sure makes a damn nice wedge!

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My guess is that the previous year's model will work just as well as the current model, for most amateurs. 

I have always had the opinion that manufactures of any kind of product operate with "planned obsolescence" in their manufacturing minds. Golf club manufacturers are no different.

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I have SM6 58 M8 as a well as SM7 54 M8 and a SM7 50 F8. Love all three, they have taken strokes off my game! If you can find SM6’s with the right grind and bounce I think you’ll be fine. The feel is essentially the same. For me anyway. 

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No real difference between the two. If they are both new then the grooves are good. The Titleist online fitting tool is pretty good. These are the basic rules on the bounce/grind stuff.

Higher bounce is good for steeper angle of attack (deep divot). Also good for fluffier lies, both in sand and grass as it keeps the wedge from digging down too far. Low bounces are opposite that. Shallow angle of attack with little divot, tight lies, hard fairways, and shallow filled bunkers. Most golfers are better off with more bounce. Grind is important if you are using the wedge with an open face to hit flop shots etc. Can also be helpful on uneven lies. That being said, the more you grind off the bottom of the club, the less forgiving it will be.

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