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themiah06

When to Start Playing the Same Ball?

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Hey guys! I was just wondering at what skill level should someone start playing the same ball? I started playing golf last June and have made decent progress on my game. Right now, I'll use any old ball I find lying around on the course, and I can certainly tell the difference between different golf balls.  I don't know if buying a particular ball will help my game because on average I'll lose 4 (give or take) balls a round.  Any input or advice would be much appreciated, thanks!

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I'm no expert...

I believe it's important to play the same type of ball so you don't get too many surprises.   Having said that, if you are losing about four per round I believe it would be a wise choice to play a dozen of one ball and see if you like it, then try another.   Switching back and forth between different types of balls won't really help you get a feel for what works for you.   

If you find a ProV1 laying around (as you called it), it may have been in the water a long time or have some other defect.   It's not fair to judge a ball based upon balls that you find..laying around..

I'm sure others will chime in to help.

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3 hours ago, dennyjones said:

I'm no expert...

I believe it's important to play the same type of ball so you don't get too many surprises.   Having said that, if you are losing about four per round I believe it would be a wise choice to play a dozen of one ball and see if you like it, then try another.   Switching back and forth between different types of balls won't really help you get a feel for what works for you.   

If you find a ProV1 laying around (as you called it), it may have been in the water a long time or have some other defect.   It's not fair to judge a ball based upon balls that you find..laying around..

I'm sure others will chime in to help.

That's a good idea. I'll give it a try! Any recommendations on a lower spinning ball? I've been thinking about getting used srixon z-stars from lostgolfballs.com

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Walmart out here sells a Nitro ball for $5 a dozen. It's a one piece ball I believe. 

Maybe start a round with a cheapie, new ball. Maybe after losing one, or two of those cheap critters, then start playing those you found to finish up the round. 

Myself, I dtarted playing the same ball once I acquired enough confidence in  it, to honestly believe that there was nothing else being marketed, that would be better to play for my game. . 

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7 hours ago, themiah06 said:

Hey guys! I was just wondering at what skill level should someone start playing the same ball? I started playing golf last June and have made decent progress on my game. Right now, I'll use any old ball I find lying around on the course, and I can certainly tell the difference between different golf balls.  I don't know if buying a particular ball will help my game because on average I'll lose 4 (give or take) balls a round.  Any input or advice would be much appreciated, thanks!

I think it is ok to switch balls and experiment. If you are losing 4 balls a round, I would consider price and feel. There are so many decent choices in this category. Such as Wilson 50 elite, TopFlight D2 Feel, Bridgestone Extra Soft. If you prefer even softer balls and can go a little higher in price. Supersoft or coming soon (10-8) Supersoft magna. This is a slightly bigger ball recommended for beginners.

Edited by Sandhills Golfe

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I agree that playing the same balls has a positif effect on your game, I started playing the same balls a few months ago and I feel more confident. (esp. with putting)

PearlGolf, Vice and Cut are great affordable balls to play. So you always play new balls aswell, that way you have nothing else to blame but yourself;-)

(the lie, weather, unlucky bounce, course, someone else breathing to loud... We golfers always find something/ someone to blame but ourselfs!lol)
 

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I play one ball which I mark so I can tell which is my ball once on the fairway or in the woods. A friend of mine plays all different balls and when you ask him what he hit, he has no idea, (pain in the ass). I can lose a couple of balls a round so I play "cheap" balls. I like TaylorMade Noodles (long/soft). I just purchased two dozen this morning for $20.00 plus shipping and tax from Rockbottoms Golf. With shipping and tax came to $32. In all honesty I'm not good enough to tell the difference between balls but I know I'm not paying $4.00 a ball. I have played ProV1s, good ball but I'm retired and can't afford them.

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The answer to your question is simple. As soon as you can tell the difference. Thus will begin a lifetime of experimentation.

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For me. It was when I stopped carrying a waterball for times when I was too scared to hit my good ones if there was trouble I had to negotiate. 

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I would recommend playing the same kind of ball for your entire round for anyone who can reasonably afford it. Between rounds you can try out different balls to see what works best for you or what you like the most. That said, this doesn't mean you have to go out and buy 10 dozen ProV1's to play.

If you use a popular budget model golf ball you should be able to at least partially replenish your stock with what you find from other golfers. I've seen plenty of Noodle or Top-flite balls, though I can't say I particularly recommend the Top-flites.

A good option for people who want plenty of golf balls that feel good and perform reasonably well for beginners, without having a large cost attached, is the Snell Get Sum ball. If you order them by the 6 Dozen they're about $14.20 per dozen, and they're good balls.

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7 hours ago, cooke119 said:

I play one ball which I mark so I can tell which is my ball once on the fairway or in the woods. A friend of mine plays all different balls and when you ask him what he hit, he has no idea, (pain in the ass). I can lose a couple of balls a round so I play "cheap" balls. I like TaylorMade Noodles (long/soft). I just purchased two dozen this morning for $20.00 plus shipping and tax from Rockbottoms Golf. With shipping and tax came to $32. In all honesty I'm not good enough to tell the difference between balls but I know I'm not paying $4.00 a ball. I have played ProV1s, good ball but I'm retired and can't afford them.

 

5 minutes ago, Pretzel said:

I would recommend playing the same kind of ball for your entire round for anyone who can reasonably afford it. Between rounds you can try out different balls to see what works best for you or what you like the most. That said, this doesn't mean you have to go out and buy 10 dozen ProV1's to play.

If you use a popular budget model golf ball you should be able to at least partially replenish your stock with what you find from other golfers. I've seen plenty of Noodle or Top-flite balls, though I can't say I particularly recommend the Top-flites.

A good option for people who want plenty of golf balls that feel good and perform reasonably well for beginners, without having a large cost attached, is the Snell Get Sum ball. If you order them by the 6 Dozen they're about $14.20 per dozen, and they're good balls.

Thanks for the reply guys! I'll definitely check out the Noodle ball!

2 hours ago, Edsland said:

For me. It was when I stopped carrying a waterball for times when I was too scared to hit my good ones if there was trouble I had to negotiate. 

True, I guess there isnt a point to playing a specific ball for consistency if you swap it out sometimes.

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