Leaderboard


Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 12/23/2016 in all areas

  1. iacas

    The Four Stages of Competence

    Wikipedia defines the four stages of competence as: Unconscious incompetence - The individual does not understand or know how to do something and does not necessarily recognize the deficit. They may deny the usefulness of the skill. The individual must recognize their own incompetence, and the value of the new skill, before moving on to the next stage. The length of time an individual spends in this stage depends on the strength of the stimulus to learn. Conscious incompetence - Though the individual does not understand or know how to do something, he or she does recognize the deficit, as well as the value of a new skill in addressing the deficit. The making of mistakes can be integral to the learning process at this stage. Conscious competence - The individual understands or knows how to do something. However, demonstrating the skill or knowledge requires concentration. It may be broken down into steps, and there is heavy conscious involvement in executing the new skill. Unconscious competence - The individual has had so much practice with a skill that it has become "second nature" and can be performed easily. As a result, the skill can be performed while executing another task. The individual may be able to teach it to others, depending upon how and when it was learned. It comes with a picture that I've included to the right. Consider how you learned to ride a bike. You started off being incompetent, for sure. Before you knew that you could ride a bike, or how you might even start to go about doing it, you were unconsciously incompetent. You didn't even understand how to ride a bike. At some point you hopped on a bike and swerved all over the place for the four feet you traveled before you hopped off or fell over. You knew that you were incompetent, hence, conscious incompetence. Slowly you figured out that it was all about balance. You knew what you had to do - balance, and lift your feet up, and pedal, and steer too. And you were thinking about all of these things as you were riding your bike. Your four feet turned into ten, then a hundred, then halfway down the block before you crashed because you tried to turn around in a driveway. You crossed over from being consciously incompetent to consciously competent somewhere in there (depending on how you define competence). For a more specific example, the first time you get a bike with dual hand brakes (one controls the front wheel, one the back wheel) you started off having to think about which brake to apply (never just the front one!). You could do so, but there was always a partial second of thought like "which one is it again?" Then after a short while, you can hop on your bike and go. You can turn. You can brake. You're clearly competent, and you can do those things while thinking about how much of a bummer it is that Jenny doesn't like you back, and that your parents are mean, and that you can't wait for your baseball game tomorrow. You are unconsciously competent - you don't have to think about riding a bike at all. For a more recent example, consider how you learned to drive. At first you had to remember all sorts of things, and think about them, even which way to flick the stick to signal a left turn. Now, you just hop in your car and go. This all applies to golf, as well, and this thread is how you do it: Let's take, for example, a golfer who just goes out and plays golf. Let's say he shoots in the 90s and hits the ball fat, thin, and all over the map. He goes to take a lesson. Why? Because he's unconsciously incompetent. He knows he's incompetent, yes, but he doesn't know why or what he should work on first. So his instructor films him and says "you need to work on Key #2: your weight does not go forward at all in your downswing." Bam: the golfer is now consciously incompetent. He knows what the fault is, but still can't do it right. So the instructor gives him some drills. He demonstrates. He has the golfer do things in slow motion and with shorter swings. The golfer is still consciously incompetent. He still can't do the move properly. He can do it better, but it still may not be competent. So the golfer keeps working. He knows what he's doing wrong, how to fix it, and eventually when doing drills or actively thinking about a feeling, he can do it (as well as he can be expected to, which may not be perfect). He's become consciously competent. Eventually, the golfer notices more and more that he's able to do this - he's trained himself to do this - without having to think about it so much. Maybe it's a swing thought, or something he practices with a little half practice swing before he hits his shot, but it's not something he's actively thinking about while hitting the ball. So, a question for you all: at what point should the golfer above seek out instruction for his full swing? There are three possible answers, IMO, but the first - Time #1 - is a given: at any point in step 1 the golfer should seek out instruction, because he's both incompetent and lacks a road map or the knowledge to do anything differently to improve. Take a moment to think about it, and then scroll down. Here are the other times when a golfer should seek instruction. Remember that Time #1 is when the golfer is incompetent and doesn't know what to do to improve. He's "unconscious" (doesn't know) and "incompetent" (bad at the thing). Here are the other times: Time #2: When the golfer is unconsciously competent, or in the middle of step 4, he's ready for new information. If he can achieve Key #2 reasonably well during the downswing without having to think about it, he is ready to work on something else - to go back to step 1 and work on shallowing his shaft in the transition, or achieving inline impact, or something else. It's inadvisable for the golfer to seek out new instruction when he's in the middle of the third step - the golf swing happens too quickly to consciously think about two things during one swing. Occasionally we'll give students two things, but we typically only do so when one is a backswing thought and the other is a downswing thought, and even then we will caution them to work on only one thing at a time. I'll say something like "yeah, hit four balls thinking about this one, and then three balls thinking about the other one. It helps things stay fresh and staves off boredom or complacency." Time #3: When the golfer is struggling to move from conscious incompetence to conscious competence, he should seek out instruction. He knows what's wrong, but for one reason or another, is having trouble actually correcting it. It may range from the student not really understanding the drills or things he was given (note: that doesn't mean he's unconsciously incompetent - he still knows what he's trying to improve, just not how to do it), or that he's overdone them so much that he's almost created a new problem, or that he's just forgotten the feel that clicked during a lesson and a text to the instructor may be all he needs to get back on track. Golfers screw this stuff up all the time. They seek out a lesson when they're between steps 2 and 3. More commonly, they seek out instruction when they're dead smack in the middle of step 3 - they can make really good swings (for them) when they're actively thinking about their "piece," but it hasn't sunk in yet to where it's truly unconscious. Golfers also almost never really achieve complete unconscious competence, either. Unlike riding a bike, golfers tend to slowly revert back to what's natural, or form some new bad habits. When a PGA Tour player says something like "I have a tendency to get a little stuck sometimes. I worked on it all winter and was playing well in the first half of the season, but it got away from me a bit around the British Open." What that golfer is saying is that he was in step 3 in the off-season, worked to get it pretty deep into step 4, but as he played in tournaments and pro-ams and had some good finishes and then worked on his putting stroke and his bunker play and hitting the driver a bit higher, he slowly slipped back into step 3 territory: conscious competence. He still knows what he has to fix, and how to fix it, but it's slipped back into where he can probably only do it when he's thinking about it. He's just across the line - he might even win tournaments with a swing thought related to getting stuck. I'll conclude with a question for all of you. We see this golfer on TST all the time, and it's something that plagues a lot of golfers on the Internet. This golfer seeks out a ton of information. They read a lot, watch a lot of videos, and absorb a ton. They can tell you fifteen things wrong with their swing. They can point out the various quirks of different Tour players, and are often dogmatic about what makes a good golf swing. They seem to "know" a lot of stuff… So the question: what zone are they in? Why?
    10 Points
  2. I am proud to announce that the 2017 Newport Cup will be held at the Talamore Resort in Pinehurst, NC! The teams will be competing on both of Talamore's great venues, Mid-South and their New Course (pic below). Check out Talamore's site HERE
    9 Points
  3. caniac6

    The USGA was created today in 1894

    Some guys in blue blazers saw some guys having a lot of fun playing golf, and they said, "We'll fix that."
    7 Points
  4. dkolo

    Hello (again)

    I just wanted to quickly pop in and say hello after having taken most of 2016 away from the site. Sorry to have ghosted for a while, but I had a lot happening at once, and I needed to take a step back for a bit and get everything back on track. Now that I've moved to Wisconsin, I'm excited at what the future has in store, and I'm looking forward to becoming more active in the great community again. Thanks to @iacas for reaching out and helping to welcome me back into the fray. I missed all of you! Cheers to a great 2017!
    6 Points
  5. 1badbadger

    Classic/Old School Golf Pics Thread

    I lived next door to my neighbor for almost 14 years before I found out he was friends with Ben and Valerie Hogan. He was the minister at the church they belonged to for many years, which is how he got to know them. I'm not sure how it's possible it never came up, but he showed me a few items he had saved including this: "Golf is not a game of good shots. It's a game of bad shots"
    6 Points
  6. David in FL

    It's all about the ball--and ego

    It is hard. They're just really good. If someone wants to see the gap between the pros and themselves close, all they have to do is get better.
    6 Points
  7. cnl390

    Could I have taken relief?

    What was the proper way to play this lie? Relief w/ no penalty, drop w/ penalty or play it where it lies?
    5 Points
  8. I have always enjoyed golf, but in 2010 at the age of 30 I discovered a passion for it. I moved to the Milwaukee area that year from Minneapolis and golf became much more affordable to me at the same time. I started playing a little more and at the end of the year I set out to see how much I could improve my play during my 30s. I started the journey in 2011 at around a 15 handicap. It may have been a bit late in life to try something like this, but it was a way to challenge myself and also enjoy the outdoors. I started playing early morning 9 hole rounds before work 3-4 times a week and I would go to the range a few times per week on my lunch break. I faced my share of challenges along the way. I would say I have a pretty natural ability to make changes and improve my swing, but I often struggled with that intangible ability to just make consistent shots off the tee. I did make some nice improvements early and entered the single digits pretty quickly. Not long after however, I endured a major bout with the shanks. I had them on and off for over a year. In the fall of 2011 I found the TST community and became a member in the search for a better swing. Ultimately signing up for some online lessons with evolvr.com proved to be the game changing help I needed at that time. I continued to improve over the next few years. In 2014 as 3.8 handicap, I somehow started battling the hooks. There were even a few weeks when I exclusively used a 4 hybrid off the tee, and did not carry a driver or fairway wood in the bag. I continued to work on the driver and woods at the range during this time. Ultimately a trip to visit @iacas ended up helping me make the changes that were needed to fix the problem more permanently. I ended 2014 with a 3.6 index and felt ready for 2015. Fast forward to April 9th 2015. I was playing a round of golf with my Dad in Florida. I had a decent front nine going considering I was coming off a long winter break. I was on the 9th hole which was a par 5 and I hit a nice drive down the left side. I was looking at about a 200 yard shot to get the front edge of the green for a good chance at making par or better. I had to clear some water at about 185 yards in left front portion of the green but it was not really an issue. I took out a long iron to try and place a shot to the open area just to the right and in front of the green. I addressed the ball and quickly felt comfortable with the shot. I had no idea what that swing was going to cost me. I began my swing and on the downswing near the point of contact, I both felt and heard a loud pop. The club went flying in the follow through and I immediately hunched over grabbing my left arm near the wrist. The pain was excruciating.
    5 Points
  9. CarlSpackler

    Pay By The Hour Green Fee

    This would take frustration with slow play to a whole new level. It's one thing to waste my time, but wasting my money is another thing.
    5 Points
  10. I think I can simplify this. Lets play a match, and I hit every green in regulation, while you miss half of them. So far its all about full-swing stuff. For the holes where we're both on the green in regulation, say I'm closer, because I'm obviously a better ball-striker. Even if you're a much better putter, you're likely to gain no more than a hole or two on those nine, or maybe we're even, because you're putting from further away on average. Remember, I'm the better ball-striker. On the others, where I'm on the green putting and you're chipping, you're going to struggle to halve most of them. I'm going to make more putts, even if I'm not great, than you're going to chip in. I win those 9 holes, 3 or 4 or 5 up. The match is mine, based almost entirely on ball-striking and full swings, even if your short game is better. What do you need to do to win? Chip in more often, or hit more greens? The more effective thing to do, if you can, is to improve your full swing stuff, and hit more greens.
    5 Points
  11. For those who would prefer not to have a slow-play issue or penalty influence the outcome of a tournament, I'd suggest that slow play already DOES influence the results. For players who move along at a decent pace, many will tell you that going too slow throws them off their game. So its the slow players who are costing faster players strokes. Enforcement of an effective pace of play policy would simply change which players get adversely effected.
    5 Points
  12. Hey, all. I know I've been MIA but I just wanted to check in and wish everyone a happy new year. My schedule should slow down some now that I'll be going to school part time this semester. I'm happy to report that my body transformation continues. I ended up losing 80 pounds in 2016 and got down to 196 pounds. Hoping to slim down a bit more before working on putting some muscle on. I'll be posting progress in this thread for those that are interested!
    5 Points
  13. Yeah, y'all know what's up. The One Who Moves the Needle will be teeing it up this week. I'm hoping for 4 consecutive 59s from Tigs and he wins by a bazillion strokes. Discuss away.
    4 Points
  14. There are two parts, player and tournament. You don't have go Googling for data, it's all here in one page, assuming it's accurate. Some abbreviations I never knew - SG: OTT - Off the tee. SG:ARG - Around the greens. If you are a statshead, I've probably ratholed you. Sorry in advance. http://datagolf.ca/interactive-golf-data/
    4 Points
  15. DaveP043

    Palm Springs in January

    We had a great day at Silver Rock today with @Big C. It wasn't great golf, but it was great weather, a really good golf course, and a great time to reconnect with a Newport Cup friend. The weather looks just a bit iffy for Thursday and Friday with @tristanhilton85, @mvmac, and @Golfingdad, but we'll be hoping for the best.
    4 Points
  16. dkolo

    How Many Courses will Tiger Design?

    I bet he'll start out strong, but wind up designing about two or three fewer than Jack Nicklaus.
    4 Points
  17. Note that if you played in the 2015 Newport Cup, right now, I'd say that slightly hurts your chances of playing in the 2017 Newport Cup. @mvmac may not do that, but for the Blue team, I'm leaning that way, toward getting some "new blood" involved. It's not a strong lean or bias, but it's there for me a little right now.
    4 Points
  18. I think people are being too hard on Furyk. Sure, he has one of the worst records in Ryder Cup history but his style of play was never suited for match play to begin with. But Furyk has been a top player for many years without much "weaponry" to rely on. Clearly the man has a lot of guile or else he wouldn't have had the career he has had.
    4 Points
  19. jsgolfer

    Pay By The Hour Green Fee

    I almost think that it would be better if you pay a set price and get a refund or some kind of voucher to play later at a reduced rate if you play in under 4 hours?
    4 Points
  20. iacas

    What's the deal with grain?

    It doesn't. To maximize sun exposure the blades of grass would actually want to be perpendicular to the sun, not pointing at it exposing the "end" to the sun. Grain primarily follows the slope of the green. Bent grass greens have very little grain. The 2" over 20' was the maximum variance he could get. This was on putts that crossed the slope. Grain primarily affects speed. If a green stimps at 10, into the grain may be 9 and down-grain may be 11. Golfers probably shouldn't worry about grain much at all, except possibly to consider the item just above. That's about it. There's no big mystery to grain.
    4 Points
  21. Yeah, don't put much stock in what the announcers tell you. They (Mark Rolfing specifically) have spent a lot of time this week trying to explain how putts here don't break towards the ocean, but rather away from the mountain. That's dumb for a couple of reasons. First, it's just a slight rewording of the same stupid idiom - that somehow geological features in the nearby vicinity of the golf course have the ability to affect golf balls like the moon affects the tides. And, secondly, it's not even right. News flash, Mr. Rolfing: Putts. Break. Downhill. End of story. Sure, in general, greens are going to slope with the natural terrain and on coastal courses that is going to be towards the water, but if the ground slopes a different direction, so too will the ball break. Oh, and then there is this: While the leaders were playing number 6 today, Rolfing spent several minutes trying to convince the viewers that it just doesn't make sense to hit driver over the crest of the hill and let your ball funnel to the collection area next to the green when the smart play is to lay up to 100 yards. That a 100 yard wedge from a fairway elevated 50 feet above the green is somehow better than this: If you think that any person with a golf club, tour pro or 40 handicapper, is going to be better from 100 yards than from here, then I don't know what to tell you.
    4 Points
  22. Knock on wood, but looking like it may be Talamore that hosts the 2017 edition. http://www.talamoregolfresort.com It's a little confusing, but we'd likely play at Talamore and Mid-South. We'll have more news by the end of the month.
    4 Points
  23. RandallT

    My Swing (JonMA1)

    I don't have an answer for you, but I've had this a few times this past year. All I can say is that it started to get better when I changed my attitude from frustration to one where I'm kinda forcing myself to enjoy the challenge. I mean- wtf- why would things be different on an outdoor range, just because I'm swinging at a ball?!!?!?! Part of the answer, I think, is letting go. Giving up the tension, as you mention. I now sorta look forward to bringing some change I've got "nailed" via a few weeks of what I think is "conscious competence" at home in the mirror and documented here with 5-10 minutes a day: It's so cool to shift from that tenseness of a new piece to the "comfortable and easy" feeling you mention. For me, I've definitely learned that small bits of practice every day, on nearly the same thing- from slightly different angles sometimes- can really help get over that hump at the range. That's why that thread on four stages of competency resonated- it's almost like it applies to home, then the range, then the course. For the past year, I've just gotten to a point where I enjoy "migrating changes" like that. In the professional world, we would test stuff out in a development environment. Then roll changes into a more formal test environment. After lots of testing, we'd go live to production. Same with the changes to the swing! Gotta get to unconscious competence in each area (home, range, course) in its own time. Keep working on it, and it just sorta happens eventually- different pieces, different amounts of effort. So my only point is that you're not alone, of course. I don't have the answers, but I do think things have gotten more fun for me when I've relaxed and tried to enjoy those stumbling blocks at each stage. Kinda a cool challenge really.
    4 Points
  24. It wouldn't be because he took 10 seconds too long over a single shot. It's a patten of behavior that would lead to a penalty. Warnings are given when they are out of position and put "on the clock" (thank you, Rolex, the official timekeeper of the USGA and the PGA tour). That 10 second delay might be the final action that leads to a penalty, but not the first (or only) action. It wouldn't be a surprise to the player, and he would have had opportunity to make up the difference. And if it's a known condition of competition, then all of the players are subject to the same standard.
    4 Points
  25. Blackjack Don

    Mindful Golf

    In the spirit of the new year, resolutions and all that BS, I submit to you a new year's resolution that works, not only for golf, but for ones whole life. Most people have heard of mindfulness, but most of those who have heard of it don't know what it is. Not really. So, this is my contribution to TST and the wider golf universe: Sit down, and be quiet. Follow your breath. Much of the game of golf is played in what is called the most important six inches--between the ears. Everyone has heard of "being in the moment." Most of us have experienced being in the moment, if not for long. Unfortunately that experience is not only fleeting, but seemingly out of the player's control. Unfortunately, too, this seems to most as mystical, hippie stuff. I'm a Buddhist. I've experienced this reaction many times when I explain to people about meditation and mindfulness. You don't have to sit on the floor in a full lotus position, light incense and candles, and chant. Meditation is nearly as easy to do as falling asleep, and often times that's exactly what happens. (Listening to someone snore while everyone else is meditating is interesting, to say the least.) It doesn't take long--20 minutes is perfect--and doesn't take any special talent or equipment. The results, however, are priceless. That quotation is from an article in Psychology Today in 2013 by Michael Bader. None of this happens without one thing: meditation. It's a practice that takes time and effort, self-disclipline to do it, and a desire to get better. There are more benefits to meditation and can be or need to be listed here, but I'll guarantee you will benefit in more ways than you can know now. The only thing you have to believe about meditiation is it works. You have to believe it long enough to prove it to yourself, and it will in time. About three months. If you sit for twenty minutes, and bring your mind back to your breath every time it wanders away, do this many, many times, for 90 days, you will experience something magical. Mindfulness meditation--called Vipassana in my school--is magical. It changes the mind. I could give you scientific studies, or say how this is 2600 years old and has worked for millions of people, but the proof is in your own mind. When it comes to focusing, relaxing, awareness, only vipassana trains the mind to be completely aware of both mind and body. You don't need a coach. You only need to do it. Sit, close your eyes, focus on your breathing. Pick a point--the tip of the nose, the tip of your upper lip, the belly--and concentrate on it as your breath goes in and out. Count breaths, five at first or ten in and out, then up to ten breaths. Start over. This is a good way for the beginner--or anyone doing it, actually--to focus. Tell your mind to relax, settle down. Focus on the breath. The mind will wander away. It does this. That inner voice is not connected to you. Let it go. When it wanders off again, note it. Just see it for what it is, without any judgement of doing it right or wrong. Let it go and go back to your breath. Note it, and let it go. That's all there is. There is nothing else to do. If you want to, make this a New Year's resolution. Just sit for twenty minutes. Until the end of March. Then, again at the end of April, check yourself. It takes awhile for the changes to take place and even longer before you're aware something has happened. People will think you're different. You smile more. Stuff that used to bother you a lot doesn't seem to get to you. Life seems easier. This is the benefit, and the only way to get into that zone, where you "see the ball, be the ball." Yes, it seems mystical and Eastern and weird, but it's about as scientific as one can get. It works for everyone who tries it. It is amazing, and easier than dieting and exercise as a resolution to keep. Just sit and breathe. Trust me, it will make 2017 better. Namasakan, and happy new year. Don--who was once called Ajahn Gatasaro. :)
    4 Points
  26. iacas

    2016 Yearly Member Award Winners!

    Okay… let's get things started! Kickstarter of the Year These members started the topics that had the most posts. To keep things appropriate, I did not count some threads that may be really old, like "What'd you shoot today?" and similar things, and I didn't consider wildly off-topic (non-golf) threads, either. Also, staff-begun threads are invalid, as staff members are not eligible for Member of the Year awards. This ruled out a lot of popular topics like the "2016 Masters Toonamint" topic. These topics that survived and came out on top saw a good amount of discussion. KOTY #3: TST's Bronze Kickstarter of the Year is… @dunfy3, for starting a thread about the Ryder Cup, and then vanishing into the mist, much like the hopes of the European team after a thrilling Sunday for Team USA. KOTY #2: TST's Silver Kickstarter of the Year is… @Valleygolfer, for starting what would ultimately become the Tiger Woods Catch-All Discussion topic. Yes, the topic was from 2014, but it received the second-most posts in 2016. KOTY #1: TST's Gold Kickstarter of the Year is… @rkim291968, for starting a topic back in 2013! Still, there are apparently a lot of golfers looking to break 90 (either for the first time, or consistently so), and this topic does a great job of allowing them to console each other and cheer each other on. All it's missing compared to an AA meeting is the stale coffee and donuts. And the anonymity. But hey, it's often got alcohol, and you can't say that about an AA meeting! Rookie of the Year These members joined the site within the last month of 2015 or any time in 2016 and amassed the most reputation points while remaining in good standing throughout 2016 (only points earned in 2016 count). It's pretty simple, really, and these guys have a bright future ahead of themselves. Note: winning Rookie of the Year does not preclude you from also winning Member of the Year awards. It'd be like a rookie in a major sport also winning the MVP - it can happen. But didn't this year. ROTY #3: TST's Bronze Rookie of the Year is… With 53 reputation points… @Marty2019! Marty joined us on December 8, 2015. ROTY #2: TST's Silver Rookie of the Year is… With a grand total of 104 points, and having joined us only on May 17, 2016… @Groucho Valentine! ROTY #1: TST's Gold Rookie of the Year is… Edging out the welcher of bets and the incorrigible Mets fan by a slim margin of only seven points, with 111 in total, a member who joined the TST community on March 19, 2016, and a guy whose username seems more at home on an archery forum… @Buckeyebowman! Now, it's on to the big one. The one we've all been waiting for. The… Member of the Year These members are the best of the best. They amassed the most reputation points during the calendar year 2016, and remained in good standing throughout the year. Their peers - you guys and gals - felt their posts were worthy of the most thanks, skins, fist bumps, high fives, or reputation, whatever you want to call it. These are the elite. The people who make insightful posts that help further the discussion… even if you disagree with them occasionally. Staff are also ineligible for this award. MOTY #3: TST's Bronze Member of the Year is… This member joined the site on March 29, 2010 and had a down year in posting because his laptop broke and he waited for a new MacBook Pro before he could resume his normal activity level. With 14,884 items of content (total, not in one year, that'd be crazy), 41 days won (total), a 128 MPH swing speed, and a grand total of 368 points won during 2016, the bronze award winning Member of the Year is @saevel25! MOTY #2: TST's Silver Member of the Year is… This member has a current content count of 15,814 and joined the site on February 26, 2012. He's a dad, but in his off-hours he moonlights as a large purple singing dinosaur to amuse, education, and more often than you'd think frighten children. He's been a single digit golfer for a while now. With a newfound love of kiwis, 113 days won, and a total of 537 points earned during 2016… our silver award winning Member of the Year is @Golfingdad! MOTY #1: TST's Gold Member of the Year is… Now it's time for the big cheese. Like the previous two members, this guy battled to a tie in the 2015 Newport Cup. But there would be no tie in this race. This gentleman joined the TST community about this time of year two years ago: January 14, 2015. He's won 44 days since then, and really blew away the competition with 703 points amassed in 2016. The best of the best of the best, this year's cream of the cream of the cream (yuck?!) of the crop… @DaveP043!
    4 Points
  27. I think there is a pretty clear tee it forward argument in those GG numbers.
    4 Points
  28. GLFTPS

    Geezerbill's Friend's Preshot Alignment

    I wrote to the USGA. The reply said that a mark in the dew would violate 8-2a. I was wrong. Sorry. Take care.
    4 Points
  29. mvmac

    Unpopular opinions you have about golf?

    A golf course doesn't have to be a lush field of green in order for it to be a "good course". I think most golf courses should adopt this style of design. Saves a lot of money on water, maintenance and I love the way it looks.
    4 Points
  30. In no order except whatever they come to me Reducing SKUs seems wise but what percentage of golfers do you think you cover with two models? Bridgestone has four B330 models but you have just one urethane ball. Will we see yellow MTB any time soon? Any plans to offer customization for customers with stamping of their names or pithy sayings? Or custom numbers? Your balls are made overseas but you offer logo options here and that is done aftermarket stateside? How difficult to navigate is the golf ball patent sea? How are you able to come up with a dimple pattern that works and yet is not in violation of some of what seems to be thousands of patents? Do you support the patents in the golf ball industry or are they a necessary evil? Should a dimple pattern be patentable? Or a method of making a golf ball? Are there bad patents among the good ones? What is most challenging about working with tour players? What is most fun? Easiest? How often do you get to play golf? If you could go back to school and had to do something completely different with your life, what would it be? Is the golf ball the most highly engineered piece of sporting equipment in the world, or does something else hold that title, like a hockey stick or a ski or something?
    3 Points
  31. iacas

    Who is your golf nemesis?

    Myself.
    3 Points
  32. Golfingdad

    2017 Farmers Insurance Open Discussion Thread

    I'm excited to see the North Course reno. Here are some "during" pictures: http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/visuals/story/sdut-torrey-pines-north-course-renovation-golf-2016jun07-photogallery.html One obvious change, which makes total sense, is the reversal of the nines. The last 5 holes were the blandest on the course while the first 7 are the most memorable and picturesque. Also think it was a great idea to remove the ponds on 17/8. They seemed so out of place (so does the pond on 18 south IMO) and they were sorta swampy and ugly. http://fox5sandiego.com/2016/11/29/newly-renovated-torrey-pines-north-course-opens/ Also of note, tips were lengthened by 200 yards (so maybe it won't be quite as easy for the pros??) and the greens on the north are now bent instead of poa.
    3 Points
  33. 14ledo81

    How can I ever get an eagle?

    If you can only reach one of the par 4's in regulation, I think you should move up to order tees. My only eagle came from holing a long greenside bunker shot on a par 5.
    3 Points
  34. mvmac

    Palm Springs in January

    Just want to say thanks to @DaveP043 for the invite. Had two great days of golf with very little rain! Some pics of Desert Willow. Classic Club. One of @Golfingdad's best shots of the day. Blind shot, I think from 180, to a small green with water short and left.
    3 Points
  35. CarlSpackler

    Winter Happiness Thread

    I just bought a FLSTC back in March. It's beautiful riding weather down here which is enhancing my winter happiness. Photo evidence.
    3 Points
  36. RandallT

    What'd You Shoot Today?

    83. Definitely one of my best. Met 3 retirees today, and had a great time. The best part was that I carried over some of the feels from my recent lessons and range work. That's unusual!!! I could actually remember the feel of what I was working on, and it mostly felt comfortable. For the most part, I was advancing the ball somewhere near the green in regulation. I haven't studied the stats yet, but I felt like I was getting the ball up and down a lot! Hit more than my usual number of knee-knocker putts, it seemed (4/5/6 footers). http://www.gamegolf.com/player/randallt/round/1303611
    3 Points
  37. RandallT

    upper back issue

    First, sounds like you need to suck up the costs and seek real medical attention on that. The red flag is that it is so persistent. Toughing through pain is one thing, but you are likely dealing with something that needs real treatment. If you're lucky you might get a couple folks with ideas or even a few that think they know exactly what it is. Maybe they're right, maybe they're wrong, but you're still going to probably want to get it checked out by a professional. Good luck!
    3 Points
  38. I think the far more glaring error in the tweet is the FACT that the dog is not surfing, but paddle boarding. Geez, can't the PGA Tour tweeter even get that right!
    3 Points
  39. Chilli Dipper

    2017 Sony Open

    Aggregate score vs. score relative to par. Kapalua is a par-73 course, so it takes twelve more strokes to shoot par for four rounds compared to a par-70 course such as Waialae. 73•4=292; 292-31=261 70•4=280; 280-27=253 Thomas took eight fewer strokes to reach 27-under than Els did to reach 31-under.
    3 Points
  40. RandallT

    My Swing (RandallT)

    Range today. Course tomorrow perhaps! Woohoo- it's almost like I've got Spackler's weather. Those videos were strictly trying to focus on left wrist. A tiny bit on a proper backswing, but my goal was to start the process of making my left flat wrist be automatic. In each video, there's a slow motion swing where the wrist is on my mind- without hitting a ball. The next swing is slow-ish motion (hitting the ball), and I think about the wrist condition a bit less. The final swing is mostly full speed, where I try to just let it happen. My assessment: the flat wrist is better than before, but still have a tendency to rev my wrist the wrong way right at the top of the backswing. I think my shoulders stop their turn, but my arms/hands keep going up and my wrist cups a bit. So while I'm trying to be honest in what I'm seeing, I'll let the instructor tell me what he thinks. (but comments welcome, of course) The overall thought is that I feel quite a bit more "tense" over the ball outside than I feel in my foyer. It's hard to explain, as "tense" is not the right word. I think one answer is to take some video of my practice inside to ensure that what I'm doing is what I FEEL I'm doing. But the feels are quite different (home vs range). In fact, the whole idea of getting a feel for a specific part of the swing and moving that feel from one environment to another seems interesting. I don't even know if it's a phony idea, frankly. Perhaps I do the EXACT same thing in both places, but they sure "feel" different. I have dropped in on other swing threads to discuss similar ideas- so maybe it's just something that resonates with a bunch of us. Tomorrow, I'll try to play a round- just to get out and have fun. Enjoy the weather. Take a break from dedicated practice and back to enjoying golf and the guys I play with. Probably warm up with a small bucket so the first tee isn't my first shot, but I'll try to let my unconscious swing go and see what happens. Then it's back to work as I'll probably get feedback from my instructor from the vids above.
    3 Points
  41. I recommend everyone interested in playing bookmark that thread.
    3 Points
  42. I might pick up a new Newport Cup for this year's event. The old one… well… it's pretty old. I'd sooner cancel the Newport Cup.
    3 Points
  43. CarlSpackler

    Winter Happiness Thread

    I've only been here 6 months and 1 day, so I do know what skiing is. I just always HATED it because the white stuff you refer to is very cold and quickly turns to a greyish mush that refreezes when the sun goes down. If I so desired, there is an indoor skiing / snowboarding facility at the end of my street. I have won some tickets to the Diamond Resorts Invitational Golf Tournament this weekend at Tranquillo Golf Resort. I might get some golf in, but this is what I will be doing for a majority of the weekend. Hopefully I don't forget my sunscreen. I'm still not used to needing it in January.
    3 Points
  44. It very well could. I know a lot of people whose handicap index (or differentials if you want to talk about individual rounds) go down when they play higher rated (rating/slope) courses. Maybe your index won't go down @Pendragon, but mine probably would. For example I tend to shoot the same score from the black or blue tees at Whispering Woods, yet one is 74.0/144 and the other is 72.0/142. Yeah, and all golfers worse than a scratch golfer are affected at the same rate (percentage). A 140 course is the same "percent" harder for a 5 as it is for a 20. Not necessarily near par, but near the course rating, yes, because multiplying 0 by anything (any slope) is 0, so the slope doesn't have as much of an (or any) effect. But scratch golfers define the "difficulty" differently - they tend to define it based more on the course rating. Put a scratch golfer on a PGA Tour stop and he's not going to "shoot near par" very often at all… but he may shoot 78 or 79 or so, near the course rating. That course is difficult in a different way, and might have a slope lower than a 71.6/145 course. 118/113 is 1.044. 130/113 is 1.150. 124 is of course 1.097. It's really not that much of a change. Calculating your own course ratings/slopes is not too difficult given a set of tees. There are pretty simple formulas for doing combo tees, as you know. At that level, since the upper and lower bounds are known (ideally), it's really a close approximation to just do a sort of weighted average to determine the tees. You won't always be super accurate - a forced layup that's erased from the up tee but comes into play on the back tee might not be weighted properly, for example - but it's really close. If they have some par fours that they can't reach from the 130 tees but can from the 124 tees, that can obviously make a difference. But the "difficulty" of a course doesn't go up much when you change the slope a little bit. 72.0/118 = guy shoots 88 = differential of 14.7 72.0/130 = guy shoots 89 = differential of 14.2 Not a very big change. Remember, 118 to 130 isn't like it's "12" strokes. It's not even 12%, because the base isn't 100, it's 113. Furthermore, slope can drop and a course can still be more difficult. Consider Course A at 72.0/144 and course B at 73.4/132. Score Differential A (72.0/144) Differential B (73.4/132) 72 0.0 -1.2 74 1.5 0.5 76 3.0 2.1 78 4.5 3.8 80 6.0 5.4 82 7.5 7.1 84 9.0 8.7 86 10.5 10.4 88 12.1 12.0 90 13.6 13.6 92 15.1 15.3 94 16.6 16.9 96 18.1 18.6 You can see there that the more "difficult" course just by slope is the first course, yet a player shooting 80 on the each course has done comparatively "worse" on that first course because it's got a 1.4 stroke lower course rating.
    3 Points
  45. I've entered the "Jackpot" who knows, somebody has to WIN !!! IF, IF, I'm lucky enough, I will invite 7 - TST members who "Hit the Like" reputation on this post !!! How do you like me NOW .... A quote from an infamous member from Winghaven CC Ps. NPC, Red Team members will highly influence my selection ...
    3 Points
  46. dave s

    Chipping Experiment

    The reason we don't get closer to pin with the high-lofted wedges is because it's difficult to convince yourself to swing the club enough to get the ball all the way to the hole. I know this and still leave them short! For example, my 58* wedge and usual ball results in high, soft shots that roll out 3 feet or less sometimes. This means I need to fly the ball nearly ALL the way to the hole on a 30-40' chip shot. Mentally, this is hard to do. Another choice is a lesser lofted wedge, (I usually choose PW) choke down and use more of a putting stoke. Clip it clean and you'll get good roll out. I used to use everything from LW down to 8-iron around the greens. Now it's just my 58* for clearing hazards/bad stuff or the PW for pitches with rollout. Simplify.
    3 Points
  47. OS X Quicktime - I don't know how I didn't learn this sooner. If you have 3 swings in a video and you want to trim the start and end of each one, you can move the slider to where you want to split out each swing and do edit > split clip, select each clip to trim the ends (you'll get a yellow outline on clicking), so in one fell swoop, with a video of three or actually any number of swings and you can edit out the walking to and from the camera working with just one file.
    3 Points
  48. kpaulhus

    Your BEST single shot of 2016 -----> go

    Albatross
    3 Points
  49. iacas

    How to repair ball marks on the green.

    http://lakeviewcc.com/turfcare/etiquette/repairing_ball_marks.php I put that together years ago with the superintendent at that course, and it still holds up.
    3 Points
  50. RandallT

    Starting handicap

    Honestly, I wouldn't worry about the actual handicap number for now. I'd start playing golf by simply trying to get to the green in 1 more stroke than regulation (on that par 3 course, that is 2 shots. For par 4/5 holes, that would be 3/4 shots). Then once putting, try to hole out in 2 or 3 putts. And start learning the rules. How OB works is critical. Learn how red and yellow hazards work for penalty strokes and drops. Plus unplayable lies. Then your scores start to get more "honest" (and I'm not implying dishonesty at all). Until then, I think you can keep track of progress on your own with a simple score average or something. Or an average number over par. That's good enough, and until you know the rules and can advance the ball reliably, you won't really want to compete I would think. But I don't think many of us would've started tracking a handicap while we were in the beginner phase that you are describing. Well, I know I wouldn't have. I'd just focus on the basic measures like scoring average, and get to work on my swing. Back of envelope. 57 on par 36 course/9 hole course. +21. That's +42 over 18. Probably a handicap in 30's, after "ESC" is factored in. There's a maximum you can take on any hole called "ESC," so it's hard to know without seeing a scorecard.
    3 Points
This leaderboard is set to New York/GMT-05:00