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    FlightScope Mevo
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    • Last Monday I experienced a very slow front 9, taking at least 2 1/2 hours. 3 riders and 1 walking, and we, a twosome, waited at every shot, except the tee, where they all teed off before we could get close enough to ask to play through. The walker wasn't very good, often hitting his drive 100-150 yards. They all played from the blues, and the walker would tee off last. The riders would take off, often leaving the walker behind to fend for himself. Finally, after a couple of holes, one of the carts would hang back, help look for a ball, etc. When they reached the green, the walker would often park his clubs on the wrong side, and after holing out, would retrieve his clubs and have to walk back across the green to get to the next tee. Did I mention the walker also moved in slow motion? Conserving energy, maybe? At the 10th, a par 5, while we're waiting to take our approach shots to the green, the walker holes out, shake hands, and heads back to the clubhouse. After that, we never came close to catching them again. Finished in 4 hours total.  
    • I break 90 now and then, and I think I am starting to notice the commonalities. 1. Don't go OB.  Just don't.  If it's a reasonable likelihood, think about club choice.  I often play a 310 yard hole with OB all the way down the right, and it's the first hole.  It's also a little downhill.  A bad 5 wood gets me within a 9 iron or less, a good one a sand wedge, or even lob wedge.  I don't need driver on that hole.  Without the OB, I think I'd play driver, but first tee, there's just no real benefit. 2.  When driver is the club, hit it.  Closer is better.  But see #1. 3.  Get out of the sand in one.  To anywhere.  Green is better, out is critical. 4.  If I'm within 10 feet of the green, I need to be thinking up and down.  Won't always happen, but those are important shots.  And where I get a lot of my pars, "almost" GIRs. 5.  I agree with not trying the hero shot, but not wimping out, either.  Know what you can do, and go for it. 6.  Three putts are bad, but don't beat yourself up over a three putt from 50 feet.  (Actually don't beat yourself up over anything, let it go, and move on.) 7.  I have found in my best rounds, I block out a lot of the noise.  Take a breath before each shot.  Focus.  Not every second, but in the time around the shots. 8.  If something feels wrong, back off.  The grass grabs on the backswing, stop!  It should not happen a lot, but once your head is unhappy, bad things are in store. 9.  Be aggressive, but not stupid.  If you can carry 220 on your best shot, and you need 210, don't do it.  I think you need to have a 80 or maybe even 90 percent probability of success.  The two shots that failure is likely to cause eat into your margin pretty quickly.      
    • Nope. That is troll-level phrasing there.
    • Touche.  On the "no" voter thing.  But like I said... feeding the sharks.  I'm trying to find a middle ground for you guys but it seems like human lives come in second place to your need for total accuracy and fear of inconvenience.

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