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Desert Driver

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0 Sandbagger

About Desert Driver

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    Member

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  • Your Location
    US

Your Golf Game

  • Handicap Index
    11
  • Handedness
    Righty
  1. I keep my profile handicap updated to the nearest whole number using my regular State Golf Association handicap. I also belong to a golf association that keeps a separate handicap using only association tournament scores. It supposedly prevents or limits sandbagging. None of you would sandbag, of course.
  2. Which Do I Prefer for a Closing Hole, par 5, par 4 or par 3? I like both par 4's and par 5's as finishing holes, but not par 3's. A par 3 finishing hole has an odd feeling to it and I haven't come across one yet that doesn't seem out of place. Each course should have its' own character or personality and an ebb and flow to play. How that play ends should fit in with the flow of the course. JMO DD
  3. If I've measured this shot before, and remember it, and the green is relatively flat and without features, most likely NO, I wouldn't spend the time re-measuring the distance. However, if I was on the far left or right side of the fairway or needed to land the ball somewhere specific on the green due to the dangers, I would.
  4. IF THEY WERE BANNED. It would have a negative impact on my game for sure. I have become very accustomed to taking a distance reading with my rangefinder not just to pins, bunkers and hazards, but to all sort of objects including golf carts in front of us to see if they are out of range before hitting. I would be back to walking off distances from known yardages which certainly takes more time than raising the laser and taking a quick reading. Back to yardage books. That being said, those are the very reasons that support the use of rangefinders and GPS'. Be grateful for them.
  5. I agree with David, excellent advice. Make sure you are playing from the appropriate tee for your current skill level. As for the hooking problem on this bad boy, make sure that your nervousness isn't translating into a TIGHT grip. And if the sight of all the trouble out in front of you gets you a little psyched out, try something that helps me. Stand behind the ball and look down the fairway and select the target where you want the ball to go allowing for your flight characteristic. Look for the line the ball will take to get to that point and pick a spot out in front of your tee'd ball that you can use for alignment that you want the ball to pass over on the way out to your target. Ok, now go up and take your stance and align yourself to that point a few feet out in front of the ball and imagine your shot. DO NOT LOOK UP AT ALL OF THE HAZARDS AND TROUBLE AND OB AND ALL THAT, just look at that spot out in front of your tee'd ball and then take your swing and put the ball right over that spot you picked out. This lttle pre-shot routine has really helped me get over some of the difficult shots that I come across out on the course. Focus on the shot and the target, not the trouble. Good luck -
  6. First book that I've read that really talks about how to PLAY golf to score. Lots of books out there talk about mental toughness and how to hit great shots, but this book goes over strategies of playing YOUR best game, whatever that is. I've bought several copies of this book, two for myself and the rest as gifts for golfing friends and family members. I re-read the book a couple times a year to go over the basics that I seem to stray from time to time. I would highly recommend this book to those who are attempting to lower their scores.
  7. Left Handed, Left eye dominant, and play righty. Had a lot of trouble squaring up the clubface to a truly square position in relation to my stance. Finally took a lesson from the club pro to figure out what my alignment problem was. We figured it out. I have to be very careful in aligning myself for a shot since my lead eye is dominant. Driving range practice with alignment sticks is helpful. My best success came from selecting an intermediate target a few feet out in front of the ball when standing behind the ball, then algning myself and the clubface using that intended line at address. With putting, I have two things that help me. I putt left hand low, which is my dominant hand and align the ball with my big toe of my front foot. I also use a mallet style putter that has a lengthy line to use for alignment. I mentally look for the path to the hole including the break and then make sure that my putter alignment corresponds with my intended line. Then I roll the ball into the hole. Hopefully, I've read the line and break properly. I've been told I am a very good putter. Like anybody, when I am having trouble hitting the ball where I intend, I go back to the basics and check my alignment first. I usually find the problem there.
  8. A few years ago, a local golf course had aerated the fairways earlier that day and left the castings to dissolve on the fairway. When I asked the front desk how to deal with the holes and castings they said they are doing "lift, clean and place" for the next week to 10 days until they fairways have healed. This last week another course was aerating the fairways right then and there, but picking up all the castings. I asked if they had any rulings for balls coming to rest in an aeration hole, and I received the the instruction of, "lift, clean and place" if in an aeration hole. Asking for the local ruling seemed to be the best idea. Everybody was on the same page at the first teebox. Fairways and Greens . . .
  9. Depends on who I am golfing with. Guys I golf with most of the time are not much on gambling. Most of the guys don't think they golf well enough to gamble on every hole. Consequently, If there is any betting, we will usually pick one or two of the shorter Par 3's on the course and have a closest to the pin contest; a buck or two each for those that want to opt in. It makes it fun for the higher handicappers to take a few bucks off the better golfers, if they can.
  10. Par 3 - My tee shot spins off the front edge of the green back down the hill into a mostly dry water hazard between several tall clumps of grass. I can get a club on the ball but only if I swing Lefty. (I play righty) So I turn my SW upside and aim for a spot up on the green. Catch the ball perfectly and it comes right out, takes one bounce on the face of the hill and hops up on the green. To cap it off, I have a 12' putt uphill with a right to left break and roll it right in the middle for par.
  11. I love my fairway woods, they are 2 of my favorite clubs. The 3-wood is my go-to club if my driver is having trouble and the two FW's are great for shorter par-4's and long par-5's. I have 15 yards difference between the two clubs. Several hybrids have gone through my bag. None are close to replacing either of the FW's. Warning; Neither club has the high trajectory of a hybrid from the deck (for me anyway). I can get a beautiful high flight by adjusting tee height, but off the deck they have a lower boring flight that is great when playing in the wind. Driver - TM Burner - 10.5*, stiff shaft. 3-Wood - TM Burner Superfast 2.0, 15*, stiff shaft. 250 yds. 5-Wood - TM Burner Superfast 2.0. 18* stiff shaft. 235 yds. Irons 4-PW, 4 iron is just over 210 yds. GW - 50* SW - 54* LW - 60* Putter I have a 25 yard gap between my 5 wood and my 4-iron. Where I play, I rarely have trouble with my spacing, so my bag is pretty well set. If I was consistently looking for a 220 club, I would have to pick up a club to fill the spot and drop a club from somewhere else. Also, I find it easier to hit my fairway woods well than a hybrid. Just me I guess. Good luck. DD
  12. Thanks for the reply - I can relate with you. I have been a right to left player for a long time. (lefty that plays right handed) On occasion though, I've had trouble with the dreaded pull hook which can be a disaster. Consequently,this last year, I neutralized my grip a little bit and am trying to eliminate all that is left of the left side of the fairway. This works well with the G15's as they do a nice job of straight. They really square themselves up and are consistant at distance. I can work the ball some, but I have to overcome the weighting of the club to do so. And I don't get a lot of feedback as to where I hit the ball unless it is the extreme. I can always tell if I get way out on the toe and thin. High on the face gives a weak feeling and too close to the heel is an unknown unless I should strike a hosel, which is a dead giveaway. (Don't say that word) My scores have come down a lot over the last year, So, overall, I think weakening my grip has been a good move for me. I do get in periods where everything seems to be right and I feel a little bit like I'm protecting against the pull hook by blocking shots right and this is a hard rut to get out of for me. I can get plenty creative with my clubs, but there are limits. I THINK I could use some more feel to my game. I would also like to have an easier time of hitting shots under the wind, or at least, lower than I am currently hitting. It seems at times I get the ball up there in the jet stream and the next stop is going to be off in the rough or well off the green. A narrower sole would certainly help with difficult lies and playing from the rough. Wet rough is another story. My big questions are; How well am I capable of striking the ball? And will I learn and adjust to the increased feedback from a change in my irons? And will the change allow me to improve my scoring? All good questions. DD
  13. Congratulations. May your next birdie come quicker than the last one. Save the Scorecard. DD
  14. No - It is a different thing all together to break 80 playing 18 holes straight and playing by the rules. It is all about keeping your game and emotions together for 18 continuous holes. That's why it is a goal for so many amateur golfers, it is a difficult challenge. Breaking 40 isn't such a bad accomplishment either, by the way. I play a lot of 9 hole rounds due to limited time. This year I've worked hard to get in more 18 hole rounds for this very reason, breaking 80 was a goal I'd not yet reached. I've had a lot of 9 hole rounds pieced together by the GHIN system that broke 80, but we all know inside that this isn't "BREAKING 80". Come on guys. I finally broke thru earlier this year and shot a 77 on a difficult course. Once I figured out how to do it, it has become easier, something I've been able to repeat. Best of luck in your quest to break 80. Fairways and Greens. DD
  15. I was hoping nobody would ask as it is embarrassing to be so insecure with clubs that i can't settle on a set of irons for more than a year or so, but I get the feeling that others have probably been in the same predicament, so, here we go. I started on what I call the golf club merry-go-round about 10 years ago after my game improved to the point that I felt I was ready for the next step, new clubs, blades. ( http://thesandtrap.com/t/49746/post-mortem-130-to-88-in-6-months-what-worked-what-did-not/54 ) I had been playing some PIng I-3 O-size irons, my first fitted set or irons. After using them for a few years and feeling over confident because I had lowered my scores from the 110's down into the mid- to high 80's. I decided it was time to take the next logical step and get some clubs with more workability, I decided on a set of Mizuno Mp-32's. I had them for about a year and hit them pretty good for the most part, and loved the feel when I hit the ball well. Problem was my distance control was way off. Depending on how well I hit the 'sweet spot' I could easily be a club long or short of my average shot. I was flying greens and coming up short all too frequently. My scores took a big hit. Well, after not quite a year, I had enough pain from bad scores and decided my swing wasn't good enough to hold up to the MP-32's and it was time to tuck my tail and go back to a game improvement club. A friend suggested I try the latest Callaway offering. So, I got rid of the MP-32's and picked up a set of X-18's (it has been a few years, but I believe that is right) with the uniflex shafts. The store insisted the One-shaft-fits-all, were great. Not so great for me. Shaft way too soft, ball way too high. I didn't have those more than several months and I decided to go back to some Ping's, the I-5. I was fitted and they really wanted to put me in some S300 shafts stepped stiff to match my swing and to stop the ballooning ball problem with the Callaways. The I-5's were ok, but I never really felt like they were quite right and I missed the feel of the forged Mizuno's. Less than a year later, I decided to try a set of Mx-200's. These were so, so, for me. Good, but not great. I still hadn't found anything that played as well as my original Ping I-3's and my scores were hanging around bogey. I finally thought enough is enough and sold the Mx-200's and decided to try some used clubs, including some older Ping I-3's. I picked up 3 different sets, Ping Zings', Ping I-3's and Ping Eye-2's and played them for a little over a year. The I-3's were ok, not as good as I remember them. The eye-2's were a better head, really easy to hit from all types of lies, more of a players clubs, but the shafts weren't as good and the lofts were weak compared to the newer clubs and I was a full club shorter. I still felt like I could do better. (isn't that always the case?) That's the long way around to the equipment changes that brings me to where I am today. I sat down and evaluated my strengths and weeknesses on the golf course and decided what I needed to do to make a change. At the time, three of my changes involved equipment; Irons, 3-wood and putter. Over the short span of about 1 month I sold my irons sets, a nice SC putter I wasn't using and a bunch of extras that had been sitting in the closet unused for a long time. I first replaced the putter with a very generic TM770 that I putt really well with. Next was the irons. After a lot of thought I felt like I needed to get some confidence back and bought a set of Ping G-15's, 4-UW. And last, I got rid of an old Taylormade System 2 3-wood and bought a new Taylormade Burner Superfast 2.0 3-wood. All stiff shafts. What a change. I began putting better, hitting my irons with some confidence, and attacking short par-4's and long par-5's with the new 3-wood. In conjunction with this, I relocated to a more difficult course than what I had been playing and forced myself to learn to hit better and more difficult shots and learn some real course management skills. So far, it has all worked out very well. My handicap has dropped 6 strokes, I am currently sitting on a 10.0. But better than that, I am playing with a lot more confidence and really having a good time when I go out. I look forward to hitting good shots. What troubles do I still have? Well, the G15's hit the ball pretty high and the course I play on is a links style course open to the wind with firm greens and fairways. You can see the problem here, needing to keep the ball lower with clubs made to hit the ball high. I have to be very careful in club selection and how I play my shots. Second, the G15's have a very wide base that makes easy work of hitting the ball nicely off the fairway, it is hard not to hit solid shots. But the irons can be a real drag when the rough gets wet or if I find my ball in an difficult lie or if the wind is up. But we have to be honest with ourselves in all of this. I find it hard to argue with my new success. It is nice to go out for a quick 9 holes and shoot a few shots over par on a difficult course and to finally break into the 70's (on occasion). I often walk off the course with a real sense of accomplishment for having played a good round of golf. But nagging in the back of my mind is that feeling that if I am going to take the next step I am going to need to lower my ball flight and be able to do more with shots from challanging lies and that means a change in irons. I look forward to a change in a way, but also dread because of what happened last time I tried going from a game improvement club to a players iron. Well, there you go. An painful journey to say the least, but it is the route that I've traveled to get where I am. And I feel that I am much better off than I was even two years ago. I am very interested to hear your perspective on irons, having managed your game to the point you have. How much does shot workability (with your irons) factor itself into your scores? DD