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Rfordeagle

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5 Sandbagger

About Rfordeagle

  • Rank
    Well Established Member

Your Golf Game

  • Handicap Index
    8
  • Handedness
    Lefty
  1. I'll be rooting for Westwood. He's kind of flying under the radar, I hope he just sneaks up on the leaders and steals the jacket!
  2. So, getting back to the topic, the most important difference is the height of the ball. What most people don't realize is that hitters start their swing to a fixed point they think the ball is going to end up. That fixed point is not moving. Yes a good baseball swing can be long through the hitting zone and account for fractions of timing issues. Both golf and baseball players are trying to contact the ball near the bottom of their swing arcs. Please recognize that I said near, not AT the bottom. Both swings deal with sweet spot control as well as lag, power accumulators, pressure shifts, face angles, swinging from the inside, etc. Many, many similarities.
  3. Iacas is spot on with Frank Thomas. And what a beast he is! In baseball strides vary, but I'd consider a small stride being less than 3 inches or so. These are quite rare to see in guys with power. The best hitter in baseball, Cabrera is considered to have a small stride. Doesn't look that small to me, and quite a large lateral slide.
  4. I agree completely with your postings. I just want people to see the amount of COM shift Harper has in the load and stride of his swing. In my business, just like in yours we deal with a lot of myths, and one of those is staying back with no lateral shift, and squishing the bug. It simply just doesn't happen in a high level swing.
  5. Erik, I don't see where we disagree? But... Hitters do have a huge pressure shift, and some weight shift. [VIDEO]http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=m6QRzjbXzS8[/VIDEO] Clearly a weight shift back and mass moving forward.
  6. Any swing is on an arc. A baseball swing is a flatter arc than golf, but an arc nonetheless. So how does controlling the path of the sweet spot not applicable? Everything any good hitter does relates to controlling the path of the sweet spot with speed. And as you should know the pitchers arm works on an arc as well. A lot of things that I do with my students involves controlling their arm path in a diagonal fashion consistently. Thus enabling command.
  7. Love this thread. A pressure shift in a baseball swing is vital if you want any power. The weight back part that you see in a high level swing (knee behind the foot, hip behind the knee, shoulders behind the hips) is a shallowing out technique that flattens out the swing arc with proper arm work. In some swings you will see the hips going forward ahead of the shoulders during their stride, in others hitters use lower back extension (belt forward) while keeping the head steady. Good hitters are not falling back at contact. And virtually all high level hitters do have weight going forward during their stride. The load in baseball is a weight and a pressure shift to the back foot.
  8. Let me chime in on this if I may. I have seen in dozens of cases the results of steroids in professional athletes, and the difference is alarming. These differences in Tiger aren't close to drastic enough to support any claim of steroid use. As a matter of fact, professional athletes who get after a proper weight training program with a solid diet can produce better gains than anything seen in those Tiger pictures.
  9. I'm already a supporter and user evolvr, what's next?
  10. Thanks Ernest! I guess I'm confused. What's the support for? The new book?
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