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msd3075

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About msd3075

  • Rank
    Dedicated Member
  • Birthday 11/30/1983

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  • Your Location
    Houston, TX

Your Golf Game

  • Handicap Index
    3.4
  • Handedness
    Righty
  1. The SC Squareback is not face-balanced. It might have very little toe hang, but it is not face-ballanced. Scotty Cameron will not make a face-balanced putter because he doesn't think anyone should use one since it doesn't fit what he thinks is the "ideal" putting stroke. As for your original question, if you had to sell two of them sell the two that you use the least. Or you could just keep all four putters, but I have to warn you that it might lead to more putter purchases. Not taking into account the two I recently sold, I have twelve putters and counting.......
  2. As someone who is always tinkering with my equipment, I love not only the adjustability of any of the R9 drivers but also that you can easily swap shafts in and out without having to pull them like you normally would have to do. I currently have an R9 Supertri, and it's going to be hard for something else to takes it's place in my bag.
  3. All I was trying to say is that you should never just point a rangefinder at the pin, get the exact yardage, and then play whatever shot you have that will hit the ball to that exact yardage. The distance to the hole should be just one of many other things you look at when deciding what shot to play. I know this is a bit off topic and I apologize in advance for that, but to me unless you are a near-scratch golfer, you should never go after the pin and should 90%+ of the time go for either the center of the green or the fattest part of the green near the hole. Most golfers would be amazed at how quickly their scores drop if they try this for a few rounds.
  4. What does having the pin distance have to do with hitting greens in regulation? If anything, going after the pin and only using the distance to the pin will more than likely result in you missing more greens (ie. going after "sucker" pin placements). Unless you are a pro (which none of us are), you should never be going after the pin every single time. You should instead get yardages to the front and back of that area of the green and hit the club you are the most consistent at hitting a distance between those two yardages. To get these type of yardages, you can either use a GPS unit to get all of them upfront (albeit maybe not as perfectly accurate) or use the a rangefinder to get the pin distance and then determine how many paces it is from each edge of the landing area. At the end of the day, whether you use a GPS unit or a rangefinder should be completely irrelevant.
  5. It's not so much that it'll affect your stroke but that each type of putter fits a different type of stroke. The characteristic you are talking about is known as toe hang. All it describes is how the toe "hangs" when you balance the putter in the shaft and let the putter head rotate to it's equilibrium position. If you have a gated stroke (think of a gate opening on a hinge), a putter with a lot of toe hang (toe points to the ground) will fit your stroke better. If you have a straight-back-straight-through stroke, a face balanced putter (face stays horizontal when balanced) should fit your stroke better. That being said, they really are no rules as to what fits you better. Putting is so much about feel and about what's upstairs between your ears; if you are convinced in your head that your putter is good for you, then that's all that really matters at the end of the day.
  6. The sad thing is that over the weekend I picked up two more used SC putters at a local golf shop. The first is a Circa '62 #3 in the Gun Blue (shiny black) finish. It's in ok condition but will probably be sent in at some point for a restoration. The second is a Pro Platinum Newport Mid Slant. It was in pretty rough condition but still in ok to game. Since bringing it home, my wife has claimed it as her own, and it's already in a box headed out to the Custom Shop for a complete restoration.
  7. If you want to replace your grip with the same SC cord grip, you can buy them on www.scottycameron.com under the Accessories portion of the Studio Store. I personally like Black Baby T grip so if it were me that'd be my choice.
  8. ???? There are quite a few variables that go into determining the density of air. Saying what you did is extremely misleading and not anywhere near close to explaining what really goes on.
  9. I'll on average hit my 5 iron about 200 yards. I base all my yardages off of my "summer distances" where my 5 iron is 200 yards and my 9 iron is 150 yards. I then club myself accordingly for everything else based off of these two clubs. In colder weather, I use the formula where you lose 1 yard for every 3°F below 85°F (basically at 55°F I need 1 more club).
  10. Are you sure it was a Studio Select he had refinished in Pro Platinum? Pro Platinum is a plating, but the big thing is that it can only be applied to carbon steel. It cannot be applied the stainless steel, and seeing as the Studio Select line is made from stainles steel, it isn't possible that his putter is a Studio Select. As for the original topic, about a year ago I had a TeI3 Newport restored and refinished in Pro Platinum at the Custom Shop. I never weighed the head but if there is any weight loss from the restoration it's small enough that you won't notice it at all. As for the feel of PP, it definitely has a harder feel as well as a more pronounced clicky sound. The difference is not huge, but it's enough that you'll notice it easily.
  11. Oh my, where to start. I have a bit of a "putter fetish" going on right now. Here's what I currently have: - Scotty Cameron Newport Beach Tour A015308 (current gamer) - Scotty Cameron Inspired By David Duval (current "bad weather" gamer) - Scotty Cameron JLM Coronado Tour A006864 - Scotty Cameron Custom Shop TeI3 Newport (refinished in Pro Platinum) - Scotty Cameron Custom Shop Studio Design #2 (CS POTD 7/23/10) - Scotty Cameron Circa '62 #6 (Charcoal Mist finish) - Scotty Cameron Pro Platinum Coronado Mid-Slant (current project) - Ping Redwood D66 - Odyssey White Hot SRT 2-ball - Odyssey Black Series #3 And putters that I had but ended up selling: - Scotty Cameron Button Back Newport - Scotty Cameron Studio Select Newport 2 Yes, I know. It doesn't make sense.
  12. I received the following email today from the course I'm a member at... I've never received an email like that from the pro shop; usually, the emails you get are about the rep being there but that never an explicit mention of clubs being on sale as cost and for cash only. It almost sounds like they are trying to dump as much inventory as they can.
  13. There is absolutely no difference between any R9 head and its comparable TP head; the ONLY difference is the shaft and the FCT shaft adapter. As said above, the TP and non-TP use different shafts, but each shaft can be unscrewed and put in any other R9 head. The main difference between the TP and non-TP shafts/adapters is that the TP drivers come with a .335" tip shaft (and corresponding adapter) and the non-TP drivers come with a .350" tip shaft (and corresponding adapter). The only problem you might run into is if you try to install a non-stock shaft into an R9 adapter; you just have to make sure you get the correct addater (.335" = TP and .350" = non-TP).
  14. Depending on how old your Grom bag is, you might have the older model bag that had "issues" with the stand mechanism functioning properly. I have a 2010 Gram with the updated stand, and I have absolutely no problems with it whatsoever.
  15. The nomeclature used to SC putters can be a bit confusing/contradictory. The "x.5" designation is currently used to denote a putter than has a flow neck (looks like this one). Your Pro Platinum Laguna 2.5 is more similar to the Studio Select Laguna 2 that is currently being sold (has a plumber's neck). The plumber's neck has less toe hang than a flow neck. The major differences between your Pro Plaitum and the new Studio Stainless are as follows: - The Studio Stainless (SS) is made from Stainless Steel as opposed to the Pro Platinum (PP) that is made from Carbon Steel (has a softer feel) that is plated with the PP finish. - The SS has interchangable weights on the sole that allows you many different weight/length combinations. The PP does not and only came in a 330g/35" combo. - The SS has a "high toe" that supposedly makes the clubhead look "more square" at address as opposed to the PP that does not have a high toe. You'll have to look at a picture of the high toe because it's too hard to explain in words without further confusing you. - The markins/paintfill will obviously also be different between the two. Hopefully that helps you out a bit.
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