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tqcishark

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3 Sandbagger

About tqcishark

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    20
  1. thanks, I think that answers both questions
  2. me neither, but I have said such a thing before and someone with access to the complete book of golf decisions usually produces the answer
  3. two of you missed the real question, I think. Just because I can take a stroke and distance penalty on my tee stroke does not mean I can re-tee. Or does it? When can you re-tee, and when must you take a drop on teeing ground? Again, I'm not looking for any persons' opinion. I'm looking for the exact rule or decision.
  4. I can't disagree with anyone about re-teeing versus taking a drop at the spot of original shot. The question is, when can you re-tee? To be clear, I want the rule or decision, not an opinion.
  5. I try to play by the rules, as much as playing by the rules is practical. Practical is usually a question of pace. If a player in my group hits two consecutive tee strokes OB, we employ the mercy rule. Take a drop where the last ball went out. Have mercy on your playing partners. I had a situation Sunday playing with an unfamiliar playing partner, I failed to clear the water hazard hitting to the green off the tee on a par three. I was not aware of a drop zone, and was really wanting to take the stroke over, so I prepared to re-tee and hit again. My playing partner said I could not re-tee, I could only drop and hit off the teeing ground or some point forward towards the water hazard. Not knowing the rule or desiring to debate his call, I went to the front of the tee box, took a drop and hit again. I got over. No big deal. I was more intrigued by his call than anything. I did not know if this was correct or not, but it sounded right. Fast forward an hour tothe final par 3, also hitting over water. Rules guy shanked a ball into the water. This was a little different because we did not see a splash, blocked by the crest of the hill. It was fair to say, we were virtually certain his ball came to rest in the hazard, with no drop zone. He walks back, declares a lost ball and re-tees. A learning golfer could carry a rule book and I'm not sure he would definitively make either call quickly. I would love to hear some opinions, including the mercy rule.
  6. this pretty much sums it up
  7. I always carried my bag but when I got into my 40s the fatigue factor was notable. I played with a guy pushing a clicgear and I was sold. I bought one and never looked back. The clicgear cart is a caddilac of golf trollies. I like the three wheeler because I can begin my club selection as a I approach my ball. I can carry gear, there's drink holders, an umbrella holder. I also bought the cooler bag that clips on under the cart, but I rarely use it.
  8. played some cold golf through the winter, mostly disappointing double bogey golf. My last round before the arctic blast broke into the 80s. After a month long winter shutout, I returned with a second round in the 80s. First time I shot back to back rounds in the 80s. 2015 is looking good.
  9. if you let MJ play through do you get an autograph?
  10. I struck two buckets of balls today at lunch. It was a good day to golf
  11. I spent years playing typical hacker double-bogey golf, never honestly breaking 100 on a championship course. Not once. To my credit, I never cheated to break 100. No mulligans, foot wedges, improved lies were used to break that barrier. Recently I applied myself and practiced a better swing and pretty easily shaved 15 - 20 strokes per round in about a year. But its been a challenge to improve or even maintain a level of better golf without the same or more commitment to practicing consistently and correctly, including resisting temptations to overswing and take risks. I did take a couple of lessons, but maybe not the way some golfers do it. I spent enough time at the range working on proper mechanics and grooving a repeatable stroke to the point where I could hit every club with consistent straightness and distance. Then and only then did I take a lesson. In my mind it would be a waste of money getting a pro to fix big flaws and make big changes. What I wanted from the pro was minor changes to improve what I already accomplished on my own. I didn't approach it like that. I asked the pro if I needed to overhaul or just tweek stuff. He liked my swing. He just wanted me to change minor things, as I had hoped. I took some lessons way back and it took me a long time to recover from trying to change everything on his schedule. The lessons I had more recently, after working some things out on my own, were way more beneficial. I admit I've struggled to maintain bogey golf consistency. Wrist surgery, bad weather, too much work and a new set of clubs all introduced set backs. But I also sort of got tired of just scoring around 90, so I decided to change my short game, to rely on wedges a little more. For me its worth it to take a step backwards because I know the next corner I have to turn has to do with confidence to take a full swing inside 100
  12. short game includes putting, chipping, pitching, sand play, bunker strategies , so its not 9 - 18 and for some of us its not even close. When you talk about "missing away from bunkers" that is course management. I don't agree that consistently hitting good shots from a greenside bunker is easier than learning to hit a full shot off the turf or tee. Course management isn't easy for everyone. I totally understand the concept that hitting long a straight is sort of a prerequisite to good scores, and I see you are hardover on this point. I think there are handfulls of techniques and dozens of variations of those techniques in the short game that must be learned. I also think feel shots require a little more concentration but that to is my opinion
  13. Long game versus short game is a false dilemma. Some days its one, some days its the other. For both long and short, course management is the key. I think to score well you have to be able to make good choices without expending a bunch of mental energy. For most of us I think, good effortless course management leads to better shots, long and short. And vice versa...getting in trouble leads to taking risks which often leads to swing tension. And then short game and long game suffer. In this light I think its almost unfair to compare regular golf to pro golf. Pro golfers get to have a caddy slash coach providing advice. I wonder which pro golfer would be on top if they all had to carry their own bags and make decisions by themselves.
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