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Wine&Poker

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Everything posted by Wine&Poker

  1. Switched from the ProV1 to the TM Penta about a year ago. I had been playing titleist balls for almost 20 years, but the Penta just fit my game better. Great distance, better feel.
  2. Plenty of good information here: http://www.varasanos.com/PizzaRecipe.htm
  3. Ok...nevermind regarding #2. Clear on that one now.
  4. #1: If the teeing area is defined as a rectangular area, two club lengths in depth, but the course is set up with no more than 1 club length between the tee markers and the back of the tee box, do you have an option to go further back or are you simply stuck complaining to the golf course superintendent? #2: If the tee markers are 12 inches long from front to back, does the teeing ground start at the back, middle, or front of those markers?
  5. Tad Moore Pro 1P. I've been playing Tad Moore putters on and off (mostly on) since high school. A TM2 was in my bag throughout all 4 years of college golf and now enjoys the lofty status of sitting in my office to putt around with whenever conference calls get boring.
  6. The US Senior Open doesn't start until the 29th. It is in Seattle - no way he'll miss it. I'm sure the RBC sponsorship is the reason he's playing the Canadian, but it should be a good warmup for the tree lined fairways at Sahalee as well.
  7. After years of playing the ProV1, I recently switched to the TaylorMade Penta.
  8. Take your clubs! Your game won't be affected too much if you take the school year off, but there's no reason for it. There will be plenty of Friday afternoons where you're looking for things to do. There is plenty of time for study and golf. http://www.bc.edu/clubs/golfclub/recreational.html
  9. In the NW, it's not all that uncommon to see standing water in the bunkers for 9 months out of the year. So, the situation is: A tee shot is hit into the back half of sandtrap. The entire back half is flooded. There is no way to drop in the bunker without dropping closer to the hole. Are you forced to play the ball from the water or head back to the tee?
  10. You have a much better chance of getting initiation fees waived than monthly dues reduced. It comes down to simple business principles and golf courses are businesses - ownership wants to make money. So you have two components to revenue; the one time transactional revenue of an initiation fee and the recurring revenue of the monthly dues. The monthly dues require very little effort on the part of the club and remain consistent while the initiation fee depends on being able to sell that membership. So when it comes to initiation fees, there will be good months and bad months. With the exception of the very high initiation fee clubs, very little revenue is coming from the one-time transactional fee. Any company is going to be assessed on holdings and consistent revenue. It just makes sense for a golf course to drop the initiation fee to guarantee the recurring revenue.
  11. Dan Hixson. Both great courses. I played Wine Valley last weekend and a year ago after it first opened. The course is a great design. There were obviously some immature spots on fairways and greens last year, but this year the greens were in good shape.....rock hard, but in good shape. I was surprised about the fairways though. It looks like they must have some weed growing out there and when they spray to kill it, it kills all the grass around it as well. So every fairway has bare patches about 18 inches in diameter. They're having the Washington Mid-Am there in July so hopefully the fairways are in better shape by then. Last year, I played Wine Valley in no wind at all. This year, it was a good 2 club wind. Shouldn't really surprise anyone when you look up and in the not-so-distance horizon stand a lot of wind towers.
  12. Pumpkin Ridge is my home course and it is fairly typical of NW golf - carts are usually available but rarely used. I went to high school in Atlanta and college in New Orleans and it was completely different - carts were almost always used. But in Oregon, we rarely get the heat, and never the humidity of some of other regions. During my last trip to Bandon in January, the wind definitely picked up the day we played Pacific. I heard they clocked it at 78 mph while we were on the course. It was one of those winds you wanted to take advantage of when hitting downwind, but just swinging was hard. I've never had such a hard time placing my ball at my mark on the green. It would just start blowing away. The kicker was how warm it was...at least 65 degrees. I was trying to wear a stocking cap because the sand was stinging my bald head but then my head got too hot. Shot 37-55. At least we almost finished 9 before it picked up. The other 3 days of that trip were perfect and if you're in the area again, I'd highly recommend playing Bandon Crossing as well.
  13. 1....only took me 20 years to do it. #11 at the Reserve South Course in the Portland, OR area. Slight cut on a 5 iron to a front right pin placement - 191 yds. Hit the green about 18 inches beyond the hole and spun back. I was convinced that when it finally happened it would be with a 4 iron. I had lipped out 4 times and come an inch short - every time with a 4 iron. I guess a 5 iron is close enough.
  14. Do yourself a favor and look at Tad Moore putters.
  15. Peachtree City, GA and look into the Canongate courses. You join one (for very affordable rates) and get playing privileges at a constantly increasing number. When I left in 93, I believe we had access to 9. Now I think its over 20 in the system. Keep in mind this was years ago, but the initiation fee was $500, and then $100-$150 / month for unlimited golf (per family, not individual). I've heard that its gone up, but not by much. Good courses, great pros, and the community of Peachtree City was developed as a planned community. Most families have a car and a golf cart. There are even golf cart parking lots at the high school, grocery stores, etc. It'll definitely be high on my list of possible retirement locations when I get there.
  16. The Reserve Vineyards, South Course #11. 191 yd to a front right pin. I cut a 5 iron in, it landed about 18 inches behind the hole, took a hop, and spun back in.
  17. By the way, winter golf in Oregon can definitely be an option. It can be a bit of a crap shoot, but in 09, I played every weekend Jan 1 - March 31 with 5 days at Bandon in January in 65-70 degree temps, clear skies, and no wind (well, most of the time). Snow isn't going to be an issue and a lot of the better courses are now built on so much sand and rocks that they drain pretty well.
  18. Missed the notation about SW Washington and was thinking of a wider area. Aldarra is just east of Seattle. The list is built on a weird area as we Portlanders can make it to Seattle courses faster than to eastern OR courses, but I should have noted the lack of Seattle-area courses like Chambers Bay on the list. The prices for these range quite a bit from course to course and from season to season (Bandon Dunes ranges from $75 - $200 depending on the time of year). Plenty on this list that can be played for under $50 even during the summer if you pick the right day of week and time of day. Some of these courses are private, but you can probably play comparable courses nearby. Witch Hollow at Pumpkin Ridge, for example is private. Pumpkin Ridge's other course, Ghost Creek, is public and will be hosting the LPGA Safeway Classic later this month. I played Witch on Saturday but play Ghost almost every week. Witch is tighter but plays shorter. Ghost is wider but plays longer. Not that much difference in difficulty. (Ghost during the heart of the season is $150, or you can buy a players card for $150 which includes a free round and then discounts the other rounds down to $65 and lower - $20 during the winter). Again, outside of the range, but only a few miles north of Oregon so I'll include it is the new Wine Valley Golf Course in Walla Walla, WA. Opened in May. I played it the 2nd weekend it was open, and while it had some maturing to do, I was very impressed. From the back, it plays 7360 yds, 75.5/130. Palouse Ridge just opened near WSU. Haven't played it yet, but next time a wine trip pulls me to Walla Walla, I'll head up there. From the back, 7308 yds, 75.9/140.
  19. I've played more than half of these courses and can say, without question, that the most difficult course in the NW is Aldarra. I assume it was left off the list because of its ultra-private status but course beats every one of the courses on the list. Bandon Dunes shouldn't be the hardest course in the NW. It's a great course, but very playable. As to how much fun: A lot!
  20. I've never used my driver to chip with. Have used every other club in the bag and will continue to do so based on what the shot calls for.
  21. I was there last in January. Granted, we had 65-70 degree days with no wind or rain, but I wasn't expecting that when the trip was planned. It just made for an even more amazing experience. So, if top 5: Bandon Trails Pacific Dunes Bandon Dunes Bandon Crossings Wine Valley - Walla Walla, WA - Same designer as Bandon Crossings, only been open a couple months but an absolutely amazing course.
  22. The Members Club at Aldarra. Probably a combination of tough course and bad play but if that course made me really hate Tom Fazio.
  23. Wine&Poker

    Shin Pain

    Have asked around with no luck, but I figured I'd post it here to see if any of you players have had a similar problem: For the past year or so, I've been getting horrible shin pain in my left leg only from hitting golf balls. This isn't related to walking the course, just hitting balls on the range makes it much worse than walking 18. Last Thursday I practiced and the shin got a little sore from the session. Friday I went to the range and about 30 shots into my session I had to quit as I couldn't even stand. I hit the ice and advil hard that night and the next morning. Played an afternoon 18 on Saturday and hobbled home to more ice and advil. I've been playing golf for 20 years...played competitively in high school and college and haven't had anything like this. I'm assuming its shin splints but can't figure out why hitting the ball causes it. Anyone have a similar experience?
  24. That wind worked well for me down in Portland. Crosswind on the 191 yd Par 3 11th on the Reserve's south course blew my tee ball into the hole for my first ever hole-in-one. Ended up with a 76, but after 20 years including high school and college golf, it was amazing to see that first ace drop!
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